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YAGT: OMG I love guns

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rudeguy

Lifer
Dec 27, 2001
47,371
14
61
Texas doesn't require sales receipts on private sells. Although doing one is a good idea.
Really?

Permit? Here the buyer has to either have a CPL (CCW permit) or a Pistol Purchase Permit (one time permit to buy a handgun).
 

HumblePie

Lifer
Oct 30, 2000
14,621
388
126
but nebor said it was UPS
Duno. He didn't say who shipped it to him either. Could be a return from having it fixed... Like I had mine dropped off by UPS when returned from Ruger. I was just giving out the scenarios where it is technically legal.

Also, you can ship through UPS. They can refuse it at the counter once you tell them what is being shipped. Nothing is illegal about it if they accept and ship it though. They just don't like doing it by "policy" as pointed out by Terry.

The law just states that a firearm being sold to another resident in the state have the shipper be a common carrier. That the common carrier must be aware they are shipping a firearm. Also the carrier can't place any label on the package that would allow anyone looking at the package to know there is a firearm in the package. So long as those conditions are met, the shipment is legal.
 
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rudeguy

Lifer
Dec 27, 2001
47,371
14
61
That 229 is a little too overdone for my tastes (and I have a ton of Sig pistols.) The beavertail is just... ick.

The UPS man just dropped off my new Glock 33 to replace a Sig 239 SAS Gen 2 as my running gun (carried in a holster wear PT-2.) Curious to see how Gold Dots run through it, since it's lighter than the P239 and my hand was already stinging with it...
RIF



caps
 

phucheneh

Diamond Member
Jun 30, 2012
7,306
4
0
Why are Gold Dots so popular, anyhoo? So many modern (and some not-so-modern) autos seem to have common concerns with feeding blunt-nosed ammunition. They might not all be LEGIT concerns...but surely there are quite a few out there, especially with anything using a short, steep, and/or off-center feed ramp.

Personally I like the Hornady ammo with the 'eraser tip.' Not just because it's filled, but because it is generally profiled more like an FMJ round. Maybe it doesn't perform as well as the Spears in ballistics test, but I'd call it more than adequate. Of course, there are also some that claim the rubber tip will cause issues, but that seems dubious. I am occasionally surprised by the severity of the angle some guns feed ammo at, though (as in, jamming it nearly straight up into the top of the chamber and relying on it just 'finding it's way').

What I'm more curious about, though...why a G33 for running? You literally mean running (exercise), right? That kinda goes back to what I said earlier about not really being a fan of the subcompact Glocks...seems hard to grab out of the type of holster you use, and rather likely to give you an awkward-looking lump. I guess if I saw such a lump, though, I doubt I'd immediately think 'firearm' nor even think twice about it. Could be your wallet, keys, and phone for all it matters.

I was going to limit my bullshit commentary (LOL yeah right) and not even ask 'why .357'...but...why .357? Heh. I used to run and want to get back into it, and I'm just thinking about what I would want in such a gun. What sticks in my head is that is someone was going to fuck with me, they'd probably wait until I was tired. Worst case, I've decided to finish out some jogging with a short sprint...if I had to defend myself in that state, I'd want A) something easy to grab and hold and B) something easy to shoot. I think a sub Glock with a pinky extension is good enough for A, but I wouldn't want to fight the recoil on .357sig. That new .380 Glock actually makes a LOT of sense in that scenario. G26 is still also a lot easier to manage, though.
 

RampantAndroid

Diamond Member
Jun 27, 2004
6,591
3
81
The traditional answer would be that he has a FFL. Or someone broke the law.
When I sent my S&Ws in, I sent them fedex 2nd day air (S&W sent me shipping labels) directly to S&W; they sent them back to me the same way (to my home address.) The person in my apartment's leasing office signed for it...not sure she should have...
 

RampantAndroid

Diamond Member
Jun 27, 2004
6,591
3
81
Why are Gold Dots so popular, anyhoo? So many modern (and some not-so-modern) autos seem to have common concerns with feeding blunt-nosed ammunition. They might not all be LEGIT concerns...but surely there are quite a few out there, especially with anything using a short, steep, and/or off-center feed ramp.

...

I was going to limit my bullshit commentary (LOL yeah right) and not even ask 'why .357'...but...why .357? Heh. I used to run and want to get back into it, and I'm just thinking about what I would want in such a gun. What sticks in my head is that is someone was going to fuck with me, they'd probably wait until I was tired. Worst case, I've decided to finish out some jogging with a short sprint...if I had to defend myself in that state, I'd want A) something easy to grab and hold and B) something easy to shoot. I think a sub Glock with a pinky extension is good enough for A, but I wouldn't want to fight the recoil on .357sig. That new .380 Glock actually makes a LOT of sense in that scenario. G26 is still also a lot easier to manage, though.
For a good SMALL gun: http://www.sigsauer.com/CatalogProductDetails/p938-rosewood.aspx

hollow points DO have feed issues, that's why a lot of gun reviews look at that; it's also why I shoot a box of defense ammo before loading it into mags I use for defense. Speer gold dot works well for me.
 

Nebor

Lifer
Jun 24, 2003
29,582
11
76
Why are Gold Dots so popular, anyhoo? So many modern (and some not-so-modern) autos seem to have common concerns with feeding blunt-nosed ammunition. They might not all be LEGIT concerns...but surely there are quite a few out there, especially with anything using a short, steep, and/or off-center feed ramp.

Personally I like the Hornady ammo with the 'eraser tip.' Not just because it's filled, but because it is generally profiled more like an FMJ round. Maybe it doesn't perform as well as the Spears in ballistics test, but I'd call it more than adequate. Of course, there are also some that claim the rubber tip will cause issues, but that seems dubious. I am occasionally surprised by the severity of the angle some guns feed ammo at, though (as in, jamming it nearly straight up into the top of the chamber and relying on it just 'finding it's way').

What I'm more curious about, though...why a G33 for running? You literally mean running (exercise), right? That kinda goes back to what I said earlier about not really being a fan of the subcompact Glocks...seems hard to grab out of the type of holster you use, and rather likely to give you an awkward-looking lump. I guess if I saw such a lump, though, I doubt I'd immediately think 'firearm' nor even think twice about it. Could be your wallet, keys, and phone for all it matters.

I was going to limit my bullshit commentary (LOL yeah right) and not even ask 'why .357'...but...why .357? Heh. I used to run and want to get back into it, and I'm just thinking about what I would want in such a gun. What sticks in my head is that is someone was going to fuck with me, they'd probably wait until I was tired. Worst case, I've decided to finish out some jogging with a short sprint...if I had to defend myself in that state, I'd want A) something easy to grab and hold and B) something easy to shoot. I think a sub Glock with a pinky extension is good enough for A, but I wouldn't want to fight the recoil on .357sig. That new .380 Glock actually makes a LOT of sense in that scenario. G26 is still also a lot easier to manage, though.
Gold Dots are popular because they're endorsed by elite law enforcement and military groups. I've never had problems with them in any handgun caliber, and I've shot thousands of them.

My second go-to is Winchester Ranger T-series and then Federal Hydrashocks. I have and shoot more ammo than most people here (or anywhere) though. Just spitballing, I have around 60,000 pistol cartridges right now, most of which is operational ammo and not FMJ.

Yes, I mean running. I run 10 miles a day through a nice part of Dallas that hasn't seen so much as a robbery since May 2012. Since I typically do this at 0530, it's dark, and I like to cover all my bases. No one out there knows I'm carrying a gun (except for a DSS agent that I struck up a conversation with after spotting his weapon as he bent over a water fountain one morning.) I've carried a concealed handgun for about a decade now and never been made. Simply put, with the clothes I wear (compression under armour with an over-garment) there's no lump to see, not even visible reciprocating mass when I'm running. The draw with the Sig is pretty easy, even with gloves (it was 15 degrees on this morning's run) and I anticipate it will be with the Glock too.

I'm a .357 Sig fan. Again, chosen by elite law enforcement organizations around the country due to it's extreme reliability (referencing your earlier point, I'll eat my hat when I see a .357 Sig cartridge FTL,) and proven man-stopping ballistics. I've carried a Glock 29 before too, and didn't find it uncontrollable. I actually have a Glock 26 Gen 4 that I purchased last month with the intention of carrying it, but decided better of it. All of my regular carry guns are .357 Sig, and I'm not likely to change that soon.

Oh, and for all you guys flipping out: Occam's razor, FFL. The kitchen table has been GTG again for nearly 10 years, so it's a no brainer if you're a gun guy.
 

marvdmartian

Diamond Member
Apr 12, 2002
5,515
1
81
Really?

Permit? Here the buyer has to either have a CPL (CCW permit) or a Pistol Purchase Permit (one time permit to buy a handgun).
Yep, really. Texas has the requirement that the buyer is supposed to be a resident of the state, and legal to own the firearm. Meaning they must be 21 to own a pistol, and not have been convicted of any crimes which would disqualify them under ATF laws. However, it is NOT the seller's place to verify the legality of the buyer owning the weapon (though most will ensure age and residency requirements are met).

This is the "gun show loophole" that the gun grabbers are trying to close. I have bought a revolver at my local gun show, from a private seller, and have sold pistols to dealers at the show (but also had private sellers interested).

Does it make for the occasional idiot who's not qualified to own firearms getting his hands on one? Probably. But this state is also well armed, and has probably more types of law enforcement officers available than any other state (local PD, sheriffs, constables, state police, Texas Rangers, etc), so we can take care of the rare occasion when someone does get their hands on a firearm they're not supposed to have. :thumbsup:
 

boomhower

Diamond Member
Sep 13, 2007
7,228
19
81
Really?

Permit? Here the buyer has to either have a CPL (CCW permit) or a Pistol Purchase Permit (one time permit to buy a handgun).
Same here. If anything ever happens with that gun and the cops come knocking you better have the paperwork to prove what you did with it.

Why are Gold Dots so popular, anyhoo? So many modern (and some not-so-modern) autos seem to have common concerns with feeding blunt-nosed ammunition. They might not all be LEGIT concerns...but surely there are quite a few out there, especially with anything using a short, steep, and/or off-center feed ramp.
Mainly because they are popular with cops. Sad thing is the reason they are popular with cops makes them not the best option for CCW use. GD's are good cop rounds because they are very good a penetrating automotive glass and still doing a decent job expanding in a human. But for most CCW users are much much less likely to be shooting through auto glass than a cop. Other rounds expand better in general than GD's do, HST's for example would be my pick.
 

velillen

Platinum Member
Jul 12, 2006
2,120
1
81
Anyway, I was pretty happy that I was at least able to de-cap and resize successfully. Gonna order a set of calipers later today, along with another reloading book (already have the Lyman 49th Edition that came with the kit), and a primer pocket cleaner. Oh, gotta get some powder too. I got bullets and primers at Cabela's this weekend, but they only had 3031 powder (IIRC). I'd like to get some 4895 (IMR or H) as that seems to be most recommended for 30-06.
Make sure you let one shot dry a bit after spraying it. I spray one side, let it sit for 3-4 minutes, roll them 180 degrees (ish), spray again and let dry 3-4 minutes again. Havent had an issue so far even with the 30-06. I found if i rush and dont let it dry it works like crap. The pad type lube is good too but sucks when you do large amounts of brass at once.

As for the powder theres plenty of options. 4895 might be hard to find since it is a go to for many 30-06 loads including the m1 garand (which needs certain powders/velocities to be safe)

As for reloading books. just not the hornady is only really good if you use hornady bullets.

Or put another way, marginally larger than a Sig P238 yet 2-3 oz lighter and ~.15" slimmer. I have to say I'm intrigued for pocket carry. I'd like a P938 but they're pricey. A small Glock will presumably be cheaper, and I have no issue with .380.
i guess i wear the wrong kind of pants cause theres no way i could comfortably pocket carry a gun that size. And nothing wrong with the 380...i just dont want a gun in it since it means yet another round to buy/load for :) id actually have no issue carrying a 380 if i got free ammo for it

As for the xds argument, weren't all those recalled for some massive major malfunction recently?
If by massive major malfunction you mean a recall for an issue that occurred in one MODIFIED pistol while holding the gun in a very non traditional grip. Also Springfield had to modify their own test pistol in order to duplicate it. Same as those silly enough to try to recreate it with stock xds's have almost all failed (wont say all cause im sure someone claims to have done it somewhere). its a recall that people have blown out of the water cause Springfield said "fired multiple rounds" and made it sound much worse of an issue than it truly is.
 

clamum

Lifer
Feb 13, 2003
26,225
384
126
Make sure you let one shot dry a bit after spraying it. I spray one side, let it sit for 3-4 minutes, roll them 180 degrees (ish), spray again and let dry 3-4 minutes again. Havent had an issue so far even with the 30-06. I found if i rush and dont let it dry it works like crap. The pad type lube is good too but sucks when you do large amounts of brass at once.

As for the powder theres plenty of options. 4895 might be hard to find since it is a go to for many 30-06 loads including the m1 garand (which needs certain powders/velocities to be safe)

As for reloading books. just not the hornady is only really good if you use hornady bullets.
Yeah I did let it dry but perhaps not long enough. Thanks for the tip.

For the reloading books, do you have a recommendation? I have the Lyman 49th Edition that came with the kit. Do you think I need another book? I'm definitely willing to pick one up if it would be beneficial.
 

Merad

Platinum Member
May 31, 2010
2,586
19
81
For the reloading books, do you have a recommendation? I have the Lyman 49th Edition that came with the kit. Do you think I need another book? I'm definitely willing to pick one up if it would be beneficial.
Get The ABCs of Reloading if you don't already have it (not a load manual, but good info to have). Other than that it's up to you IMO. There are plenty of online resources to find load data.
 

velillen

Platinum Member
Jul 12, 2006
2,120
1
81
Yeah I did let it dry but perhaps not long enough. Thanks for the tip.

For the reloading books, do you have a recommendation? I have the Lyman 49th Edition that came with the kit. Do you think I need another book? I'm definitely willing to pick one up if it would be beneficial.
like merad mentioned the ABC's is a good read. lots of history but not so much to bore but also tons of info on the why's and dont.

As for another book...really up to you. Lee is my "go to" book since it has tons of powders for each weight bullet. it also has copper plated data which is nice. BUT they mostly just reprint data as well. If you compare the Lee Accurate Data to Accurate own data youll see its exactly the same. Same applies to Hodgen. They just compile rather than test for a lot of things.

In order of what i have
1)Lee - just the most data and wide selection of bullet weights
2) Hornady - good selection of powders and its their bullets which i use a few of
3) lyman - great for cast bullets. but i find it lacking powders i like to use.


But with that said. Using your lyman and the load data provided by powder manufacturers would really be plenty. They all have load data for their powders for at least the most common bullet weights. I keep the Accurate powder data printed and with my loading books (as i use primarily their powder for a lot of loads)
 

Bird222

Diamond Member
Jun 7, 2004
3,650
132
106
Does anyone know if shipping ammo between private parties costs more than shipping other items from UPS or Fedex? Also who tends to be cheaper Fedex or UPS?
 

Merad

Platinum Member
May 31, 2010
2,586
19
81
Does anyone know if shipping ammo between private parties costs more than shipping other items from UPS or Fedex? Also who tends to be cheaper Fedex or UPS?
No. It just has to be labelled as ORM-D. Basically, it's slightly hazardous material but doesn't require any special handling.
 

HumblePie

Lifer
Oct 30, 2000
14,621
388
126
velillen said:
If by massive major malfunction you mean a recall for an issue that occurred in one MODIFIED pistol while holding the gun in a very non traditional grip. Also Springfield had to modify their own test pistol in order to duplicate it. Same as those silly enough to try to recreate it with stock xds's have almost all failed (wont say all cause im sure someone claims to have done it somewhere). its a recall that people have blown out of the water cause Springfield said "fired multiple rounds" and made it sound much worse of an issue than it truly is.
From what I have read on this subject it was far more than that. Otherwise they wouldn't have done the recall. What I read was that if the gun was dry fired and the slide was then rack with the safety not depressed then the striker would float free as well as preventing the reset of the trigger. This was for any of the guns and not a modified one. Which was why it was a general recall. With a free floating striker condition, if a round was loaded it could potentially set off the round.

Was it a set of actions not everyone would do? Sure. But that doesn't mean there wasn't a safety concern with the guns.
 
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phucheneh

Diamond Member
Jun 30, 2012
7,306
4
0
I didn't know Gold Dot was made much differently than other JHP...someone mentioned the copper being bonded to the lead, which I'd never really thought of as a thing...but the only JHP's I've personally observed ('hey, these are some of those supposed crazy banana-peeling bullets...let's go shoot some milk jugs') definitely had separation.

So Speer is one of those that ends up in a little wad of a bullet, rather than the sides curling around into potetional flechettes or whatever? With the size of the cavity, I had always just figured them to be big expanders.

Also somewhere up there...Re: .357sig and FTF...never thought about the impact the neck would have on loading. Does make sense that they would be far less likely to misfeed than a similar 9mm or 40. However, I of course went and read up on a few ammo-related topics and am as confused as ever as to why it exists. Note: I am not looking to incite debate, I just like learning firearm-related stuff.

I'm not even a .40 fan, but at least I can tell you what a .40 does that, on paper, makes it more deadly. I.e. heavier bullet, more powder (than 9mm). But .357sig...isn't it just a .40 case necked down to a 9mm bullet? Other than the effects of a pistol cartridge being necked, why not either .40 or 9mm?

I'm browsing loads right now, and best I can tell....40 is just 9mm with a heavier bullet (looking at weight versus muzzle velocity). And uses higher case pressures, IIRC, which I think is why I find it particularly loud and snappy. .357 is 9mm with more speed (and even higher pressures).

I dunno, I'm mostly just talking to myself and trying to figure why people don't just carry 135gr barely-subsonic 9mm and call it a day. I like this stuff and can't see why I might switch to anything else unless maybe I wanna lob 147gr bullets.
 

velillen

Platinum Member
Jul 12, 2006
2,120
1
81
From what I have read on this subject it was far more than that. Otherwise they wouldn't have done the recall. What I read was that if the gun was dry fired and the slide was then rack with the safety not depressed then the striker would float free as well as preventing the reset of the trigger. This was for any of the guns and not a modified one. Which was why it was a general recall. With a free floating striker condition, if a round was loaded it could potentially set off the round.

Was it a set of actions not everyone would do? Sure. But that doesn't mean there wasn't a safety concern with the guns.
and it was also something even when done that nobody was able to fire off a round (without doing special things). Like i mentioned you should look into it. plenty of people other than Springfield tried to recreate the firing portion of it without success. It took a modified gun from both the original guy and Springfield to actually fire rounds. Was the being able to not reset the trigger an issue...yeah. Was it truly a major massive safety issue....no. Just like most recalls it was a cover our ass and at the same time fix an intermediate level issue.
 

HumblePie

Lifer
Oct 30, 2000
14,621
388
126
I didn't know Gold Dot was made much differently than other JHP...someone mentioned the copper being bonded to the lead, which I'd never really thought of as a thing...but the only JHP's I've personally observed ('hey, these are some of those supposed crazy banana-peeling bullets...let's go shoot some milk jugs') definitely had separation.

So Speer is one of those that ends up in a little wad of a bullet, rather than the sides curling around into potetional flechettes or whatever? With the size of the cavity, I had always just figured them to be big expanders.

Also somewhere up there...Re: .357sig and FTF...never thought about the impact the neck would have on loading. Does make sense that they would be far less likely to misfeed than a similar 9mm or 40. However, I of course went and read up on a few ammo-related topics and am as confused as ever as to why it exists. Note: I am not looking to incite debate, I just like learning firearm-related stuff.

I'm not even a .40 fan, but at least I can tell you what a .40 does that, on paper, makes it more deadly. I.e. heavier bullet, more powder (than 9mm). But .357sig...isn't it just a .40 case necked down to a 9mm bullet? Other than the effects of a pistol cartridge being necked, why not either .40 or 9mm?

I'm browsing loads right now, and best I can tell....40 is just 9mm with a heavier bullet (looking at weight versus muzzle velocity). And uses higher case pressures, IIRC, which I think is why I find it particularly loud and snappy. .357 is 9mm with more speed (and even higher pressures).

I dunno, I'm mostly just talking to myself and trying to figure why people don't just carry 135gr barely-subsonic 9mm and call it a day. I like this stuff and can't see why I might switch to anything else unless maybe I wanna lob 147gr bullets.

Well the history of the .40 S&W is interesting. It started after the 1986 miami bank heist shoot out. Bunch of guys robbed a bank and had body armor. The police and fbi agents that responded all were using .38 special +p rounds shooting out of revolvers. In the end they got the bad guys, but it wasn't easy.

The FBI wanted to switch to a semi automatic as their standard issue gun type, but they weren't sure of the caliber. They wanted something with more oomphf since the body armor stopped their 38 special rounds pretty handily at that shootout. They were testing between 9mm and .45 acp. Initial testing with available firearms made them stay away from both for different reasons. .45 acp semi automatic guns were big, heavy, and single stack that were available at the time. 9mm guns had more firepower, but since the 9m and 38 special are about the same size bullet, they were afraid of a lack of penetration. Which is pretty much not quite true, as any good body armor is going to stop any small arms round that isn't designed to punch through the armor with things like tungsten coating on the bullets.

So the FBI thought the 9mm was too wimpy and the .45 acp too manly. They looked at the 10mm, but basically for a lot of the law enforcement officer it had way too much snap to control. Yah, officers that don't shoot all that much complained about a lack of control when using 10mm guns. Even the reduced recoil rounds. So they came up with the 40 S&W. The 40 S&W was a handloaded 10mm round that one officer had on him during the testing phase of the ammo tests. It was basically a super reduced recoil 10mm round. It gave them the penetration rating they were looking for in a JHP round without the same recoil of the 10mm. It allowed for a semi automatic pistol fit in current guns so they didn't have to be stuck with single stack semi autos.

Thus was born the .40 S&W once S&W won the contract to make those round based off that officers original handload make. It was suppose to give good penetration for a JHP round without massive recoil problems associated with .45 acp and 10mm. It was supposed to fit easily in 10mm guns to allow for a semi automatic pistol with double stack capabilities for more firepower if needed with easier reloading than a revolver.

The funny thing, it wasn't adopted originally because of two premise problems. 1) was that even the 40 S&W was still complained about by officers in the field of being too snappy and out of control. They really liked their .38 special revolvers and how easy they were to shoot. 2) Another was that 9mm testing was done with some really bad JHP rounds during the initial FB testing. Better performing 9mm JHP were able to achieve the same penetration rating as the .40 S&W rounds they were firing. So the initial adoption of the .40 S&W for law enforcement didn't happen all that well. Most went instead to 9mm. It's only now some agencies are adopting the .40 S&W rounds.
 
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