Skylake coolers can damage the CPU's

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dahorns

Senior member
Sep 13, 2013
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#26
Thread title is misleading as it suggests that Intel coolers on non-k models cause the problem. Ultimately, this has very little to do with Intel except that Intel should obviously be working with and informing its hardware partners that the new socket is more fragile than previous ones.
 
Mar 10, 2004
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#27
Interesting that Arctic Cooling have just put out a press release saying that all of their coolers are unaffected by these concerns. As someone with one of their coolers on a Skylake I can only hope there's truth in that, although at this stage there's still so little information to go on. Feels rather weasel-wordy with the 'compliance with intel mechanical specifications' statement. Inevitable question is if somehow my cpu did get damaged from the cooler would I be able to chase AC now that they've put that out there?




I was thinking there might be some excuse made about 'you bought 3rd party cooler you took the risk shame the cpu broke not Intel/cooler manufacturers fault' and I totally forgot the Ks don't come with a cooler. If cpus are getting damaged I can see there being a whole lot of wrangling over how compliant those 3rd party solutions are or have claimed to be.

Still hoping this turns out to be not as bad as it looks. As was said, it might be you need the combination of very heavy cooler, severely overtightened screws and hard mechanical shock to cause it so the average user will never find the problem.
Heat could be a factor, too. If you get that CPU pcb too hot, it will deform more easily.
 

dahorns

Senior member
Sep 13, 2013
537
0
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#28
Interesting that Arctic Cooling have just put out a press release saying that all of their coolers are unaffected by these concerns. As someone with one of their coolers on a Skylake I can only hope there's truth in that, although at this stage there's still so little information to go on. Feels rather weasel-wordy with the 'compliance with intel mechanical specifications' statement. Inevitable question is if somehow my cpu did get damaged from the cooler would I be able to chase AC now that they've put that out there?

If you use the product as intended, install it correctly, and it still causes damage, the product manufacturer would generally be liable for the damage. That being said, it would be a hard right to enforce. Damages would be too small to bring an individual lawsuit and the nature of the problem would most likely preclude a class action.
 
Apr 22, 2012
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#29
Is there even more than this 1 example with a very heavy custom mounted cooler?
 
Mar 13, 2006
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#30
Fix the title.

"Using coolers not designed for your CPU could possibly damage your CPU."

No **** Sherlock.
 
Mar 10, 2006
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#31
You guys seen this?

http://www.modders-inc.com/psa-cooler-mounts-can-damage-skylake-cpus/

I thought Intel were cheapskates with the whole thermal paste vs solder thing and now this... Pretty poor tbh. Unless theres some technical reason im totally missing :\
Probably cost reasons, not technical reason.

Anyway, my cooler is designed to work with Skylake and I didn't kill the thing when I installed it, and I am far from being the most mechanically inclined person on the planet.
 

Techhog

Platinum Member
Sep 11, 2013
2,834
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#33
Fix the title.

"Using coolers not designed for your CPU could possibly damage your CPU."

No **** Sherlock.
Intel didn't make a stock cooler for Skylake-K. Are you suggesting that people should run these CPUs without a cooler?
 
Apr 22, 2012
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#34
Intel didn't make a stock cooler for Skylake-K. Are you suggesting that people should run these CPUs without a cooler?
But there is validated coolers for it. Including Intel made like the TS15A.

But again, is there more examples than this single one. And what cooler was used. If someone dropped the case with a kilo heavy cooler mounted sideways. Then the result is no surprise.
 

Deders

Platinum Member
Oct 14, 2012
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#35
I learned not to overtighten the cooler screws a while back. Computer wouldn't boot until I loosened the screws up a bit. Figured the mobo must have bent slightly.
 

Ferzerp

Diamond Member
Oct 12, 1999
6,426
1
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#36
I learned not to overtighten the cooler screws a while back. Computer wouldn't boot until I loosened the screws up a bit. Figured the mobo must have bent slightly.
My 3770k was like this.

I'm trying to figure out how, as long as their socket specs properly define what the forces can be, Intel has done something "wrong" here?

If they messed up on the socket specs, sure, they made a mistake, but if the specs are accurate, then... I don't get it.
 

bystander36

Diamond Member
Apr 1, 2013
5,139
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#37
When I installed my Silver Arrow recently, I was really wondering just how much I should clamp down. I noticed the square base plate was warping, so I backed up some. I know some coolers like the CM 212 line have springs that prevent a problem, but some leave it up to the user to figure out how much pressure is needed, which I'd consider the fault of the HSF manufacturer.
 
Jul 25, 2014
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#38
Hook me up for that i7-6700k tablets. Will pay in cash on arrival.
They use the same die across a wide range of products, so I would imagine that the PCB is the same too.
 
Mar 13, 2006
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#39
Intel didn't make a stock cooler for Skylake-K. Are you suggesting that people should run these CPUs without a cooler?
How did you get that from what I posted?

"Are you suggesting I don't put gas in my car because diesel will damage it?"
 

Ken g6

Programming Moderator, Elite Member
Moderator
Dec 11, 1999
14,236
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#40
This tells me not to use ICD7 as a thermal compound, as it doesn't really work well until the cooler is tightened down hard on the CPU.
 

Techhog

Platinum Member
Sep 11, 2013
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#41
How did you get that from what I posted?

"Are you suggesting I don't put gas in my car because diesel will damage it?"
Because you worded it strangely, so I wasn't sure what you meant by "designed" for it.
 

Deders

Platinum Member
Oct 14, 2012
2,402
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#42
My 3770k was like this.

I'm trying to figure out how, as long as their socket specs properly define what the forces can be, Intel has done something "wrong" here?

If they messed up on the socket specs, sure, they made a mistake, but if the specs are accurate, then... I don't get it.
If there is such a spec, does anyone have a toque screwdriver to measure it?
 

CuriousMike

Platinum Member
Feb 22, 2001
2,891
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#43
Probably completely irrelevant, but I just installed a new 4590 and a ThermalTake tower HSF and had issues with my machine booting up.
( http://forums.anandtech.com/showthread.php?t=2456006 )

Ultimately, I rotated the baseplate (which seemed to not matter) and slightly under-torqued the screws from the HSF into the plate to get it to boot.

It's been fine ever since.
 
Mar 13, 2006
10,103
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#44
Last edited:
Aug 11, 2008
10,452
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#45
Fix the title.

"Using coolers not designed for your CPU could possibly damage your CPU."

No **** Sherlock.
Well, since Intel doesnt include a stock cooler with the k models, they should have taken better precautions to make sure aftermarket coolers fit properly. That said, I dont know if this "problem" is a real issue or just an isolated incident.
 
Mar 13, 2006
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#46
Why is it Intel's issue? They provide the specification, they aren't responsible for other manufacturers implementation of the specification.
 
Apr 27, 2000
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#47
I could see this being a problem with something that works like the old Thermalright bolt-through kits, though I'm not sure that such a kit has even been released for LGA1151.

I read about this some time ago, along with Scythe's releasing updated mounting hardware to deal with the problem on some of their coolers.
 
Mar 10, 2004
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#48
Well, since Intel doesnt include a stock cooler with the k models, they should have taken better precautions to make sure aftermarket coolers fit properly. That said, I dont know if this "problem" is a real issue or just an isolated incident.
Intel should not do a thing regarding aftermarket coolers.

Intel sells coolers that fit and work.
 
Feb 8, 2004
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#49
I look forward to the flurry of "Intel can do no wrong" replies from the usual suspects while conveniently downplaying how a $300+ 6700K is designed in mind for use with enthusiast class coolers.
Looks like you were right lol.
 

coercitiv

Platinum Member
Jan 24, 2014
2,997
299
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#50
Fix the title.

"Using coolers not designed for your CPU could possibly damage your CPU."
Reminds me of how long it took to fix the title and clearly inform people of a supposed Samsung SSD firmware bug that turned out to be non existent. Actually, was that title ever properly rewritten?

That having been said, this thread's title really needs to be reformulated, right now it's borderline FUD.
 

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