Skylake coolers can damage the CPU's

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Techhog

Platinum Member
Sep 11, 2013
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#76
Nice try but no. I like repeatable evidence.

Nobody is throwing away any money, its a free ES sample if we are to believe the source.
So, you're saying that Intel just happened to give an ES sample to someone who hates them?
 

cytg111

Diamond Member
Mar 17, 2008
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#77
Typically Intel. Zen cant come soon enough.
 
Apr 22, 2012
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#78
So, you're saying that Intel just happened to give an ES sample to someone who hates them?
You keep trying to shift the goalpost. First the cost, now the hate. You forget its just about making an article people click. Whatever the base reason for the beginning is. Accident or purpose. Pcgh is a site that needs its revenue to exist, not a fanboy club.

Seems some people get upset because there isn't any issue.
 
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Techhog

Platinum Member
Sep 11, 2013
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#79
You keep trying to shift the goalpost. First the cost, now the hate. You forget its just about making an article people click. Whatever the base reason for the beginning is. Accident or purpose.
You're the one shifting goalposts. All I'm saying is that the notion that is was done on purpose is an unfounded and ridiculous conspiracy theory. That hasn't changed. What has changed is that you no longer seem to think it makes a difference if it was by accident or on purpose.
 
Apr 22, 2012
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#80
You're the one shifting goalposts. All I'm saying is that the notion that is was done on purpose is an unfounded and ridiculous conspiracy theory. That hasn't changed. What has changed is that you no longer seem to think it makes a difference if it was by accident or on purpose.
Not at all, because the article is out. And we know now after confirmation from pretty much everyone and no repeatable case that it was made up. So someone on purpose choose the sensationalism path, despite there wasn't anything to back it. And this is why tech news is in free fall and turned into rubbish and gossips.
 

Ed1

Senior member
Jan 8, 2001
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#82
The socket damage is also quite clear in 2 places. there has been a heavy force pulling to the left of the picture.



This is also one of the issues with very tall and heavy tower coolers in cases where the motherboard is mounted vertically. You get a lot of extra leverage down at the socket. So any mounting errors can be catastrophic.
whats funny with that pic , is the damage is on the top section , you would think with heavy HS it be in lower from HS pressure/sagging.
Unless the MB is mounted up side down.
 
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Techhog

Platinum Member
Sep 11, 2013
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#83
whats funny with that pic , is the damage is on the top section , you would think with heavy HS it be in lower from HS pressure/sagging.
Unless the MB is mounted up side down.
Or sideways, hence the left side being affected on both top and bottom...
 

Ed1

Senior member
Jan 8, 2001
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#84
Or sideways, hence the left side being affected on both top and bottom...
Still its in the corner only , IMO this was shock type force, not normal .
 

bystander36

Diamond Member
Apr 1, 2013
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#85
whats funny with that pic , is the damage is on the top section , you would think with heavy HS it be in lower from HS pressure/sagging.
Unless the MB is mounted up side down.
It probably happened during transport, as that is what they keep talking about.
 

dark zero

Platinum Member
Jun 2, 2015
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#87
Still its in the corner only , IMO this was shock type force, not normal .
So this is the same response about the iPhone 6 Plus with their bending problems.
 

Ed1

Senior member
Jan 8, 2001
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#90
You think that it was done on purpose too?
no , I never said that, though if you are going to ship a system with big HS you need to take precautions.
 

ehume

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2009
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#91
Pardon me if I haven't seen something. I've skipped a bunch in this thread. I wanted to make the point that some companies like Noctua stick to Intel's recommended 50lbf. If is well known that jacking up your contact pressure will improve cooling. There was even some discussion about this in 2010 or so when TR supplied some heatsinks that had screws on the mounts to increase mounting pressure, there was some controversy. Some heatsinks come with springs and have screws with positive stops, so you cannot exceed a certain pressure. Other heatsinks have nothing to stop you from injuring your CPU. Scythe even warns you not to "overtighten" their tensioning screws. Now they are sending out replacement screws. Some heatsinks do not follow Intel's specs. Reviewers ought to pay attention to mounts. Maybe they will in the future.
 
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Jan 28, 2014
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#92
We can't let the truth get in the way of sensationalism. The damage was done by shock load, not mounting pressure. Mounting pressure is exerted over the entire area of socket and PCB, not just the outer corners. Those flattened contacts are the result of "sudden impact". :D

If Scythe had said "This is what happens when someone ships a computer with cooler mounted" or "This is what happens when someone handles their computer like airplanes handle luggage." we would all be laughing about it.
 

Joepublic2

Golden Member
Jan 22, 2005
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#93
If you have one of those massive 3+lb heatpipe towers yeah pressure at the base can build to very high levels with any kind of sudden acceleration, like a drop of a foot or two when it's being shipped, even if you have the case well packed. If this were a real problem we'd be seeing dozens of threads about it, not the 2 or 3 we've seen so far. As it stands, somebody got an expensive lesson in physics and decided to cry to the internet about it.
 
Apr 27, 2000
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#94
Was socket damage an issue for LGA1150 using similar coolers?
 
Jan 28, 2014
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#95
Was socket damage an issue for LGA1150 using similar coolers?
I think the question should be "Is socket damage from shipping systems with big coolers mounted on them an issue."

And the answer is a resounding YES!

Shipping systems with big coolers mounted is asking for them to be damaged .. IMHO.

The reason some supplier who do in-house "custom builds" do it is because they feel it is the lessor of two evils; end user damaging it installing cooler or shipper damaging it in transit.
 

bystander36

Diamond Member
Apr 1, 2013
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#96
I think the question should be "Is socket damage from shipping systems with big coolers mounted on them an issue."

And the answer is a resounding YES!

Shipping systems with big coolers mounted is asking for them to be damaged .. IMHO.

The reason some supplier who do in-house "custom builds" do it is because they feel it is the lessor of two evils; end user damaging it installing cooler or shipper damaging it in transit.
Of course these new close loop liquid cooling setups are a decent alternative.
 
Jan 28, 2014
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#97
Of course these new close loop liquid cooling setups are a decent alternative.
To me most of them are not a decent alternative. The are cheaply built usually noisier, don't last as long, are usually more expensive and if the do fail it's the pump and the system is dead until a new cooler is installed .. major expense for new cooler At least with an air cooler the only thing to fail is a fan and system still works at low load or with whatever fan is available .a low cost fix with a new fan..

Okay, if you order a custom ore-assembled system and they remove the cooler for shipment you need to re-install it but it don't take a rocket jockey to to do it. A dob of TIM in middle of CPU, set cooler on it, start 2 screws and alternately tighten them. All that is left to do is maybe mount the fans and plug them in.
 

bystander36

Diamond Member
Apr 1, 2013
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#98
To me most of them are not a decent alternative. The are cheaply built usually noisier, don't last as long, are usually more expensive and if the do fail it's the pump and the system is dead until a new cooler is installed .. major expense for new cooler At least with an air cooler the only thing to fail is a fan and system still works at low load or with whatever fan is available .a low cost fix with a new fan..

Okay, if you order a custom ore-assembled system and they remove the cooler for shipment you need to re-install it but it don't take a rocket jockey to to do it. A dob of TIM in middle of CPU, set cooler on it, start 2 screws and alternately tighten them. All that is left to do is maybe mount the fans and plug them in.
I think you are a little harsh on the AIO closed loop systems, and give a bit too much credit to the people who order these things. If they felt comfortable with installing the HSF, they probably would not have bought a prebuilt to begin with.

I don't use the AIO closed loop coolers, for the reasons you give, but they aren't that bad either. On this list, the NZXT Kraken X61 ends up the coolest solution, although not as quiet: http://www.silentpcreview.com/Recommended_Heatsinks
The Thermalright Silver Arrow is the one has the best balance of heat and noise, which is a HSF (and I have one to confirm it is nice).
 
Jan 28, 2014
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#99
Maybe, maybe not. Shipping a system with a big cooler is crazy, and to me AIOs, more specifically CLCs are not even close to being what they are hyped up to be. I've said this from their inception. Fact is Asetek originally called them LCLC (Low Cost Liquid Cooler). But with marketing hype the unsuspecting public jumped on them with the false belief because they was "water" coolers they somehow were like H2O component systems .. when the only thing in common between them is water.

Sorry, CLC can drive me over the edge on occasion.

People with no mechanical skills are in a tough place if they want a custom system. But if they want a custom build, their best options are either buy locally or at least get it delivered with cooler, RAM, and GPU removed and packed separately and find someone local to put it all back together. Moving it carefully from shop to home is one thing. Shipping it is just crazy.

I'm not sure how accurate SPCR testing is. I know they use an open test bench but not sure where they monitor the "ambient temperature." If it is in front of the cooler / radiator intake all is well, of not ... Also, do the run a baseline test at the beginning and end of each test session? Because if they are not or these baseline tests are not always give the same results the comparisons between cooler over their years of testing have no bases.

I do notice one glaring inconsistency; PH-TC14PE and NH-D15 results are hotter than Silver Arrow (original SA, not SB-E or IB-E) D15 is definitely as good as it is, so why do their results show it
 
Apr 27, 2000
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That's odd. The Silver Arrow usually loses (narrowly) to the nh-d14. No way it beats a d15.
 

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