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Skylake coolers can damage the CPU's

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BigDaveX

Senior member
Jun 12, 2014
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I could see this being a problem with something that works like the old Thermalright bolt-through kits, though I'm not sure that such a kit has even been released for LGA1151.
LGA1151 has the same mounting system as LGA1156, LGA1155 and LGA1150, so anything released for a Core iX processor since Lynnfield will still be compatible with Skylake.
 

imported_ats

Senior member
Mar 21, 2008
422
63
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Points of Pressure are highlighted with red and yellow arrows.

When a heat-sink is mounted and pressure applied, the thinner Skylake PCB is getting a Plastic deformation. Because Haswell PCB is thicker (more layers) it only gets an Elastic deformation and the PCB reverts to its original shape after the release of the pressure.
Um, just as an FYI, the layers between the two are pretty much the same except for the interior buildup/backbone/inert layer(basically FR4 or PTFE) which is where most of the thickness differences come from. One of the reasons for going with the thinner inter layer is much better electrical properties.
 

ShintaiDK

Lifer
Apr 22, 2012
20,395
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So to summon up, after most of the cooling companies answered and Intel. It seems to be a Scythe issue, if you use a heavy cooler and expose it to strong shocks.

The PCB is exactly the same strength as previous. And the plastic/elastic BS was utter crap.

What a surprise. Specially since you can find these issues all the way back to the introduction of big coolers.

Next breaking news will be, using a sledgehammer on your Skylake PC can damage it.
 
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imported_ats

Senior member
Mar 21, 2008
422
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They use the same die across a wide range of products, so I would imagine that the PCB is the same too.
Not PCB, package. And no, the package changes a lot between different products depending on what that part of the product line needs/wants. Its even not uncommon to find basically the same part (all specs the same) with two different package options (board down BGA vs socket down LGA, small FP vs normal footprint, etc).
 

dark zero

Platinum Member
Jun 2, 2015
2,542
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So is official... Intel screwed up BIG time... Why? Because they wanted to gain more.. And now we have a really awful generation in terms of hardware resistance (in their performance is OK)...

Before some Intel fan like Shintai says it, I'll say:

"You pushed it wrong. So is not out fault"
 

Deders

Platinum Member
Oct 14, 2012
2,402
2
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So is official... Intel screwed up BIG time... Why? Because they wanted to gain more.. And now we have a really awful generation in terms of hardware resistance (in their performance is OK)...

Before some Intel fan like Shintai says it, I'll say:

"You pushed it wrong. So is not out fault"
Bit quick to judge. Intel are looking into it. If you missed my post above...

"Intel: said that it has only been made aware of the issue in the last two days and it is therefore investigating what "could be several variables at play". Intel confirmed that Skylake uses a thinner substrate but it is rated for the same 50lb. maximum static load as prior generations."

http://hexus.net/tech/news/cpu/88628...edium=facebook
 

Charlie98

Diamond Member
Nov 6, 2011
6,207
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*Hugs his 3 Sandy Bridge CPU's, tells them everything is going to be OK...*
 

ShintaiDK

Lifer
Apr 22, 2012
20,395
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The socket damage is also quite clear in 2 places. there has been a heavy force pulling to the left of the picture.



This is also one of the issues with very tall and heavy tower coolers in cases where the motherboard is mounted vertically. You get a lot of extra leverage down at the socket. So any mounting errors can be catastrophic.
 
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LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
28,523
1,569
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So is official... Intel screwed up BIG time... Why? Because they wanted to gain more.. And now we have a really awful generation in terms of hardware resistance (in their performance is OK)...

Before some Intel fan like Shintai says it, I'll say:

"You pushed it wrong. So is not out fault"
It's official that Intel did nothing wrong, actually. The cpu pcb is the same strength, despite being thinner.

What are you reading?
 

dark zero

Platinum Member
Jun 2, 2015
2,542
99
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It's official that Intel did nothing wrong, actually. The cpu pcb is the same strength, despite being thinner.

What are you reading?
I don't think so... If Intel told to people to NOT to use old coolers on their socket, it could be the real way to solve this. To prevent this kind of scenarios.
 

ShintaiDK

Lifer
Apr 22, 2012
20,395
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Is it right to assume its the Scythe Mugen 4 cooler used?

At least Scythe fixes their mounting system to reduce the chance of over tension. But considering the socket is broken too. I have to wonder if someone made it so on purpose.
 
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Headfoot

Diamond Member
Feb 28, 2008
4,435
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I always use spring loaded mounting scheme coolers. Long ago I used one that was extremely sensitive to how much pressure you turned it to due to backplate deformation, and I just figured it would be a heck of a lot easier to do max tightened spring loaded set ups since they are so common (212+ & Evo for example has this)
 

LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
28,523
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I don't think so... If Intel told to people to NOT to use old coolers on their socket, it could be the real way to solve this. To prevent this kind of scenarios.
What "scenario"?

We have a rare event, it seems.

Why would Intel attempt to tell an overclocker what cooler to use or not use?
 

Techhog

Platinum Member
Sep 11, 2013
2,834
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Is it right to assume its the Scythe Mugen 4 cooler used?

At least Scythe fixes their mounting system to reduce the chance of over tension. But considering the socket is broken too. I have to wonder if someone made it so on purpose.
For someone who constantly mocks "Red Team" (totally not in a passive-aggressive manner btw) for coming up with "conspiracy theories," you sure had no qualms about coming up with your own.
 

ShintaiDK

Lifer
Apr 22, 2012
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For someone who constantly mocks "Red Team" (totally not in a passive-aggressive manner btw) for coming up with "conspiracy theories," you sure had no qualms about coming up with your own.
You can start by showing more than 1 example of this. Right, you cant. We know the PCB strength is the same and we can see socket damage too.
 

Techhog

Platinum Member
Sep 11, 2013
2,834
1
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You can start by showing more than 1 example of this.
And you can start be showing evidence that it wasn't an accident before thinking that someone spent hundreds of dollars just to make your favorite company look bad. If AMD were the one affected by this and all of the evidence were exactly the same, you'd shame an AMD fan coming to similar conclusions as you are right now. AMD isn't the only company that has fanboys and shills on these forums.

Can you at least come up with a valid reason for why someone would throw away money like that on purpose? Probably not.
 

ShintaiDK

Lifer
Apr 22, 2012
20,395
128
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And you can start be showing evidence that it wasn't an accident before thinking that someone spent hundreds of dollars just to make your favorite company look bad. If AMD were the one affected by this and all of the evidence were exactly the same, you'd shame an AMD fan coming to similar conclusions as you are right now. AMD isn't the only company that has fanboys and shills on these forums.

Can you at least come up with a valid reason for why someone would throw away money like that on purpose? Probably not.
Nice try but no. I like repeatable evidence.

Nobody is throwing away any money, its a free ES sample if we are to believe the source.
 

LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
28,523
1,569
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The person with the warped socket and chip looks bad, not Intel...
 

LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
28,523
1,569
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Specs unchanged. CPU pcb and socket strength are the same.

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/skylake-cpus-damaged-by-coolers,30690.html

Intel has now provided an official statement:

The design specifications and guidelines for the 6th Gen Intel Core processor using the LGA 1151 socket are unchanged from previous generations and are available for partners and 3rd party manufacturers. Intel can’t comment on 3rd party designs or their adherence to the recommended design specifications. For questions about a specific cooling product we must defer to the manufacturer.
 

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