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NON_POLITICAL China Coronavirus THREAD

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manly

Diamond Member
Jan 25, 2000
9,233
677
126
Don't recall exactly since I never saved it but there was a study outlining the risk of covid vs vaccine related heart issues and the heart issues was actually way higher.

Not the best since it comes from two different sources and not sure if the age groups are even the same but according to these articles, risk of vaccine related issue is 1 in 20,000 and risk of being hospitalized with covid is 1 in ~33,000 (3 in 100,000). Actually higher than I thought though...

I'm not a huge fan of forcing parents to vaccinate their young children (pre-teens); but you absolutely fucking suck at reading comprehension. I'll quote from YOUR linked article:

But there’s reassuring news: This heart inflammation known as myocarditis and pericarditis after COVID vaccination is very rare. Most cases have also been mild and short-lived, with patients recovering after a few days.

In fact, heart inflammation occurs at much higher rates from a COVID infection itself, studies find.

No idea why you're comparing incidence rates of usually mild vaccine-related myocarditis to COVID hospitalization. That would be like comparing a kid falling off his skateboard to a kid being hit by a car in the intersection.
 
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sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
86,052
9,930
126
Where are you getting the data that says the risk of vaccination bad-effects is greater than that of COVID complications, for children?

I'm not saying for certain that you are wrong, but I just haven't seen any figures that demonstrate that to definitively be the case.
I am guessing FB, where red get most of his info from.
 
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Dec 10, 2005
21,365
2,970
126

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
31,758
4,161
126
Announcement for the authorization of boosters for Moderna and J&J recipients.

So, I catch wind of this yesterday on the front page of the NYTimes (online), I see it on TV news. I'm 2x Moderna vaxxed, eligible, I call my HMO (Kaiser P.), am on hold ~20 minutes, I get a reasonably intelligent woman on the line and she'd not heard of the Moderna approval. She puts me on hold to check, she comes back and can't find anything at Kaiser to confirm what I said (I saw on the website old info about Moderna not approved yet before I called). She's in a position to schedule an appt for me but won't because they don't officially recognize my entitlement. She says to check later. She says she can email my doctor and ask and see if he can schedule me (I'd already emailed him but said, yeah, please email him and she did). I figure the earlier I press for the booster the better because thousands of others will too and I want to get in line early. It's no big deal but figure the sooner the better.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
31,758
4,161
126
So, I'm wondering this: The Moderna booster is just, what? The original formulation, but 1/2 a dose. I figure the only change will be that the person who administers the shot will be instructed to load the syringe with 1/2 of what they did previously? So they should be able to start giving Moderna boosters without missing a stride, no delay at all. Right?

My PCP answers me:

Guidelines and protocol is being established now.
It's not instantaneous.
Currently, the pfizer patients are getting a booster now.
 
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allisolm

Elite Member
Administrator
Jan 2, 2001
24,010
2,262
136
So, I catch wind of this yesterday on the front page of the NYTimes (online), I see it on TV news. I'm 2x Moderna vaxxed, eligible, I call my HMO (Kaiser P.), am on hold ~20 minutes, I get a reasonably intelligent woman on the line and she'd not heard of the Moderna approval. She puts me on hold to check, she comes back and can't find anything at Kaiser to confirm what I said (I saw on the website old info about Moderna not approved yet before I called). She's in a position to schedule an appt for me but won't because they don't officially recognize my entitlement. She says to check later. She says she can email my doctor and ask and see if he can schedule me (I'd already emailed him but said, yeah, please email him and she did). I figure the earlier I press for the booster the better because thousands of others will too and I want to get in line early. It's no big deal but figure the sooner the better.
It's not enough that the FDA has approved the Moderna and J&J boosters. The CDC has to approve them as well. They are meeting today and should have an announcement this afternoon. If they approve the boosters they should also say who can get them - ages, physical conditions, time since last shot and any other conditions. After that people should be able to schedule a booster.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
31,758
4,161
126
It's not enough that the FDA has approved the Moderna and J&J boosters. The CDC has to approve them as well. They are meeting today and should have an announcement this afternoon. If they approve the boosters they should also say who can get them - ages, physical conditions, time since last shot and any other conditions. After that people should be able to schedule a booster.
I thought the CDC had approved yesterday. I was either mistaken or misinformed.
 

allisolm

Elite Member
Administrator
Jan 2, 2001
24,010
2,262
136
I thought the CDC had approved yesterday. I was either mistaken or misinformed.
I'm trying to keep informed on this. They met yesterday and are meeting today as well. As of an hour ago:

"CDC vaccine advisers are meeting to discuss boosters
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices is scheduled to meet from 10 a.m. ET to 5 p.m. ET today.

A vote is scheduled for later this afternoon.

ACIP is expected to vote on whether to recommend use of the boosters. If the committee recommends them, the CDC director must give a stamp of approval for boosters doses to be officially administered."


 
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pmv

Diamond Member
May 30, 2008
9,146
3,992
136
As someone that lost a parent to a virus when I was kid, calculations that look solely at individual physical, short term outcomes are only looking at a very small part of the puzzle. If I could've taken a vaccine with a 1 in 1,000,000 case of giving me some symptoms for a month or two and a 1 in 10,000,000 chance of death I would've taken in a heart beat to keep him from dying.

Not to mention, the benefits of keeping schools open, getting rid of quarantines, masking, etc etc

Through this experience, though, I have learned that some medical "ethics" people would rather kill a million passively than risk killing one actively.

Decided that "like" wasn't quite the appropriate reaction. Sad to hear that, and I see your point.

At one point here I saw it suggested that children be allowed to make their own choice whether to be vaccinated or not, but I can see some huge pitfalls with that idea. Doesn't seem right to put that level of responsibility on children.
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
20,188
3,245
126
Decided that "like" wasn't quite the appropriate reaction. Sad to hear that, and I see your point.

At one point here I saw it suggested that children be allowed to make their own choice whether to be vaccinated or not, but I can see some huge pitfalls with that idea. Doesn't seem right to put that level of responsibility on children.

Wow really? Who was the genius responsible for that sage advice? :rolleyes:
 

allisolm

Elite Member
Administrator
Jan 2, 2001
24,010
2,262
136
CDC voted and they are good to go for boosters for both Moderna and J&J. Now, apparently, we have to wait for CDC Director to sign off. Sigh. It's always 'hurry up and wait.'

"After the advisers vote, CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky will need to sign off. If she does, people could start getting Moderna and J&J boosters within days."

"The CDC will also issue detailed clinical guidance spelling out what people should consider in seeking out and getting booster shots. This will include whether people may mix and match vaccines."

 
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balloonshark

Diamond Member
Jun 5, 2008
5,127
1,433
136
I got 2 Pfizer shots in April. My booster was due last week. I wonder if it would be better to get a Moderna booster since they work a tad better/longer?

In other news my 8 month pregnant niece has covid, my other niece has flu-b and my sister has a cold and they were all around each other. All of them unvaxxed. I have not visited them since this peak started so it looks like I made a wise choice.
 
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JujuFish

Lifer
Feb 3, 2005
10,488
448
136
I got 2 Pfizer shots in April. My booster was due last week. I wonder if it would be better to get a Moderna booster since they work a tad better/longer?

In other news my 8 month pregnant niece has covid, my other niece has flu-b and my sister has a cold and they were all around each other. All of them unvaxxed. I have not visited them since this peak started so it looks like I made a wise choice.
Due? Are you elderly or at risk? Because otherwise it's not "due".
 

JujuFish

Lifer
Feb 3, 2005
10,488
448
136
If he's 6 months past his 2nd shot, IIRC qualifies for a booster if over 18.
These are the FDA-authorized categories:
65 years of age and older
18 through 64 years of age at high risk of severe COVID-19
18 through 64 years of age with frequent institutional or occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2
 

dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
23,140
1,384
126
I got 2 Pfizer shots in April. My booster was due last week. I wonder if it would be better to get a Moderna booster since they work a tad better/longer?
There is no data (yet) to show a significant difference between Moderna and Pfizer for your booster. The studies so far that mixed vaccines were too small to distinguish that. What they did show was that any booster you get will bring your antibodies up significantly.
 
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balloonshark

Diamond Member
Jun 5, 2008
5,127
1,433
136
Due? Are you elderly or at risk? Because otherwise it's not "due".
I'm 50 and have been in and out of hospitals for tests to determine if my 35 year old artificial heart valve needs replaced. Supposedly they've been monitoring my moderate to severe stenosis and it was considered severe during my Aug. 6th echo. Since then I've had a CT scan, diaphragm fluoroscopy sniff test and hearth cath and they looked good. I met with a surgeon and he ordered another CT scan at WVU (next week) and a transesophageal echocardiogram because he thought there may be pannus beneath the valve. If it exists and it's bad it will need cleaned up and a new valve installed.
 
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K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
37,793
12,517
136
Pharmacies nationwide are offering booster appointments for all vaccines based on the updated CDC guidelines. My 98 year old grandfather just got his Moderna booster at a Walmart.

I'll get mine in the next couple days.
 
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Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
20,188
3,245
126
These are the FDA-authorized categories:
65 years of age and older
18 through 64 years of age at high risk of severe COVID-19
18 through 64 years of age with frequent institutional or occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2

Sadly I'm now "qualified" for a booster (getting old sucks) however I would have gotten one anyway at some point regardless.

As for which one to get I think the two mRNA shots are close enough to identical that it really doesn't matter much.

However my MD would prefer I got Moderna again and since I trust his opinion that is what I'll almost certainly do. (his reasoning was that I know for near-certain I won't have a reaction that way)
 

PingSpike

Lifer
Feb 25, 2004
21,618
461
126
My state basically said they're going to look the other way on the authorized categories. I'm just going to tell them I'm fat, which I am. But basically anyone could make up a yarn about institutional or occupational exposure. Not sure if I can schedule it yet though since I'm not quite 6 months out.
 

manly

Diamond Member
Jan 25, 2000
9,233
677
126
Sadly I'm now "qualified" for a booster (getting old sucks) however I would have gotten one anyway at some point regardless.

As for which one to get I think the two mRNA shots are close enough to identical that it really doesn't matter much.

However my MD would prefer I got Moderna again and since I trust his opinion that is what I'll almost certainly do. (his reasoning was that I know for near-certain I won't have a reaction that way)
It's tricky to say definitively that one is better than the other, but neutralizing antibodies from the Moderna vaccine seem to be more durable than Pfizer's. I see little reason for you to switch now.
 

allisolm

Elite Member
Administrator
Jan 2, 2001
24,010
2,262
136
Pharmacies nationwide are offering booster appointments for all vaccines based on the updated CDC guidelines. My 98 year old grandfather just got his Moderna booster at a Walmart.

I'll get mine in the next couple days.
Thanks for posting that. I was waiting for the Director of CDC's sign off and apparently she snuck it by me. Husband and I just got back from doing a walk-in at Walmart for our Moderna booster. Wanted to beat any rush and it gives us the weekend to recuperate. All we had the first 2 times was a sore arm (sorer with the 2nd than with the first) so hopefully this won't be any worse. It gives us more peace of mind in any case.

edit: rolled onto that arm early this morning and my body said "I don't think so!" Arm is very sore but only to the touch. No soreness or limited motion in use. No fever. Nothing else that I can see or feel. Same with husband. I'll be happy with that.
 
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