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NON_POLITICAL China Coronavirus THREAD

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Spacehead

Lifer
Jun 2, 2002
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Ajay

Diamond Member
Jan 8, 2001
8,560
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right. well, also right and wrong. you are both wright and wrong.

yes, people have been working on mRNA vaccines for a very long time--conceptually for decades, in use for half that time in basic research, in humans...never until ~4? months ago, anywhere, I believe.

eBola was one of the first major promising use cases for them in humans, but if IIRC, it's just too virulent of a disease to ever get to real pandemic level, and thus, well, the incentive for funding such revolutionary tools has always dried up because it has only ever been tied up in private book planning. Got to please them quarterly shareholder brains! yessir! They KNOW EVERYTHING about how how humanity and well, the world actually works. yessir!
My bad, I thought it was tested in human, but didn't ramp up after that. Can make any money off poor African nations :rolleyes:
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
9,311
1,870
136
Watched the end of the Big XII Championship. Seemed pretty packed. Maybe it was just the crowd shots? And it was at JerryWorld too which is huge.
 

manly

Diamond Member
Jan 25, 2000
8,827
431
126
Watched the end of the Big XII Championship. Seemed pretty packed. Maybe it was just the crowd shots? And it was at JerryWorld too which is huge.
Reportedly it was quite "empty" compared to capacity:

 

destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
28,805
356
126
Watched the end of the Big XII Championship. Seemed pretty packed. Maybe it was just the crowd shots? And it was at JerryWorld too which is huge.
Reportedly it was quite "empty" compared to capacity:

That's a different game. The Big Ten championship was indeed quite empty. That's the game I watched. I can't speak for the Big XII title game though.
 

manly

Diamond Member
Jan 25, 2000
8,827
431
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That's a different game. The Big Ten championship was indeed quite empty. That's the game I watched. I can't speak for the Big XII title game though.
In my defense, I did search for Big 12 championship and Google failed me. ;) Apparently the number of fans at JerryWorld was supposed to be capped at under 19,000.
 

zinfamous

No Lifer
Jul 12, 2006
105,771
20,600
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That's a different game. The Big Ten championship was indeed quite empty. That's the game I watched. I can't speak for the Big XII title game though.
yeah it was in Indy and was empty. shitty game. stupid Ohio State. It seems to me that a team that played 6 games this year should not be allowed in the CFP when you have 9-1 or 10--1 or 11-1 teams out there.

but in general, screw Ohio State, anyway. :D Further, no conference handled the covid thing worse than the Big Ten did this year. It was a comedy of errors every week.
 
Feb 4, 2009
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I think pretty much any facility capable of making vaccines is already doing it. What would you suggest using DPA for?
Making more mRNA “goop” if needed.
Do we have enough syringes?
Do we have enough mega cold storage units?
Do we have enough gloves?
Do we have enough dry ice?
Maybe the answer is yes, I really don’t know
He wants Trump to make Ford retool for more enzyme goop.
If they can make mRNA goop then that’s a great plan.
Well, yea, that's what the DPA is for, providing incentives to companies with the ability the manufacture goods required in times of distress.

I dunno if Ford specifically could do that, but that's the idea behind the DPA.
Exactly
 
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sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
84,127
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Not exactly the same, since Canada has just under 4 times less cases per 1M people than USA.
Well our leadership maybe more effective, but the people are the ones doing stupid shit to get infected. We did ok on first wave but horrible on second wave.

<--- Canadian
 

H T C

Senior member
Nov 7, 2018
332
189
86
Well our leadership maybe more effective, but the people are the ones doing stupid shit to get infected. We did ok on first wave but horrible on second wave.

<--- Canadian
Not 100% sure but it seems to me this latest wave spreads more easily which is why cases are spiking really high virtually everywhere, including countries that were doing quite well, all things considered, in previous wave.

That said, countries should have really had much more strict lockdowns enacted MUCH sooner then they did (when they had FAR LESS daily cases) because the economic cost of such lockdowns would be SMALLER than the cost of current measures due to them being in place for a MUCH SHORTER PERIOD, despite their cost being higher @ their beginning.

Here in Portugal, we had just over 1500 daily cases as the highest during 1st wave, but 2nd wave has had several days with over 6500 cases, though is now steadily falling (not fast enough, IMO). The highest daily fatalities we had in 1st wave was 35, twice IIRC: in the 2nd wave, we've reached 98 deaths in a day, last week.
 

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
84,127
8,983
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Not 100% sure but it seems to me this latest wave spreads more easily which is why cases are spiking really high virtually everywhere, including countries that were doing quite well, all things considered, in previous wave.

That said, countries should have really had much more strict lockdowns enacted MUCH sooner then they did (when they had FAR LESS daily cases) because the economic cost of such lockdowns would be SMALLER than the cost of current measures due to them being in place for a MUCH SHORTER PERIOD, despite their cost being higher @ their beginning.

Here in Portugal, we had just over 1500 daily cases as the highest during 1st wave, but 2nd wave has had several days with over 6500 cases, though is now steadily falling (not fast enough, IMO). The highest daily fatalities we had in 1st wave was 35, twice IIRC: in the 2nd wave, we've reached 98 deaths in a day, last week.

Docs warned us second wave would be worse because people are tired of lockdown and get complacent. Provincial government are reluctant to lock down hard again due to economical reasons. So here we are spiking.
 

H T C

Senior member
Nov 7, 2018
332
189
86
Docs warned us second wave would be worse because people are tired of lockdown and get complacent. Provincial government are reluctant to lock down hard again due to economical reasons. So here we are spiking.
USA was already nearing 200K daily cases before then IIRC, but it aggravated it, no doubt.

Governments failed to notice that stronger measures put in place @ EARLIER stages (when cases numbers aren't as bad) equals more costly @ in the short term but cheaper in the long term: it's STILL BAD for everyone from an economic standpoint, but not as bad because the measures are in place for a MUCH SHORTER period of time, which is why they end up costing less overall.

Proof of this is NZ: they put in place some of the WORST restrictions in the WORLD and did so VERY EARLY. The result is there for all to see.
 
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Spacehead

Lifer
Jun 2, 2002
11,055
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Speaking about the US... and i know this has been said several time before...

Governments take actions too late. Too many people think only about themselves.

PA took stronger measures after Thanksgiving. WTF good does that do? Not nearly as much as doing something beforehand. And then there's no enforcement of those policies. WTF good does that do? Very little. Restaurants are not supposed to have indoor dining now. But if you want to say FU go ahead & stay open, there's nothing the state can do about it.

I saw on the new the other day, AAA expects 80 some million people to travel for Christmas. My face is getting tired of getting facepalmed!
 
Dec 10, 2005
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Thought y'all might find this interesting - a retrospective review of a French database of ~90k hospitalized patients with COVID-19 (from March 1 to April 30, 2020) and ~46k hospitalized patients with influenza (from Dec 1, 2018, and Feb 28, 2019).

To those that still think this is kind of like "the flu", it's not, as this study reports. Some choice quotes from their discussion are below:
  • "Almost twice as many patients were admitted to hospital for COVID-19 over a 2-month period than were admitted for seasonal influenza over a 3-month period"
  • "We found that the in-hospital mortality for COVID-19 was nearly three-times higher than for seasonal influenza..."
  • "...patients with COVID-19 were twice as likely to receive invasive mechanical ventilation, and COVID-19 patients hospitalised in the ICU stayed nearly twice as long as those with influenza."
  • "The higher in-hospital mortality observed in younger COVID-19 patients suggests that COVID-19 is intrinsically more severe than influenza. Although children seemed to have a lower risk of being hospitalised for COVID-19 (as shown here by the low rate of hospitalisation for COVID-19 compared with seasonal influenza in patients younger than 18 years), the in-hospital mortality of these children was more than four-times higher than it was for children with influenza. This contrasts with recent reports stating that the clinical manifestations of COVID-19 are very often mild in children"
Link: Piroth L et al. Lancet. 2020
 

manly

Diamond Member
Jan 25, 2000
8,827
431
126
yeah it was in Indy and was empty. shitty game. stupid Ohio State. It seems to me that a team that played 6 games this year should not be allowed in the CFP when you have 9-1 or 10--1 or 11-1 teams out there.

but in general, screw Ohio State, anyway. :D Further, no conference handled the covid thing worse than the Big Ten did this year. It was a comedy of errors every week.
Pac-12: Hold my beer.
Also, I hope Bama covers the spread against Notre Dame so that they can ban the Irish from the CFP once and for all.

Guess we can't say we're doing great anymore, we just passed half a million cases. :eek:

AKA two days in the U.S.

Thought y'all might find this interesting - a retrospective review of a French database of ~90k hospitalized patients with COVID-19 (from March 1 to April 30, 2020) and ~46k hospitalized patients with influenza (from Dec 1, 2018, and Feb 28, 2019).
Stop confusing people with science! Some of the members here have said the CFR is acceptable, that 5 times as deadly as seasonal flu is no big deal; and in a related thread, one assclown even called the mortality a rounding error.
 
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zinfamous

No Lifer
Jul 12, 2006
105,771
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Looking at this thread since ~Thursday, I see no mention of a very concerning new strain:

not likely to matter in terms of treating it, considering the vaccine is already 95% effective against, essentially, all previously-identified (5, I think?) strains of the virus. if it's non-synonymous mutation (no change in amino acid/codon function), then the vaccine essentially "ignores" it
 

Ajay

Diamond Member
Jan 8, 2001
8,560
3,345
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Looking at this thread since ~Thursday, I see no mention of a very concerning new strain:

This has been addressed, again by Moncef Slaoui. The proteins in the 'spikes' have a specific chemical geometry needed to perform their function and, hence, are far less likely to change. The spikes are what are being targeted current vaccines. The changes in the RNA of the British strain of SARS-COV-2 are therefor immaterial in terms of vaccines. These changes are material to how those who are infected by this strain respond to and spread the virus.
 
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