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New Zen microarchitecture details

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deasd

Senior member
Dec 31, 2013
256
95
101
Those pins are better than LGA for the consumer market. More broken motherboards are coming with warped pins than broken pins on CPUs.
yep, broken pins on mobo is much more a headache than on CPU......
 

LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
28,520
1,573
126
yep, broken pins on mobo is much more a headache than on CPU......
I've never had a problem with LGA though.

I've had many problems with bent CPU pins.

I don't want to deal with CPU pins anymore.
 

LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
28,520
1,573
126
Those pins are better than LGA for the consumer market. More broken motherboards are coming with warped pins than broken pins on CPUs.
I would guess that warping is from the small overclocking community, and further limited to heavy CPU coolers.

Overall, I have to think that for the majority of stock users and builders, LGA is superior.

For overclockers trying to get max speed, PGA may be better.
 

crashtech

Diamond Member
Jan 4, 2013
9,980
1,710
136
In the majority of DIY situations, the CPU is the more expensive of the two parts, so it makes sense to put the more delicate part on the cheaper side.
 

Yuriman

Diamond Member
Jun 25, 2004
5,530
141
106
In the majority of DIY situations, the CPU is the more expensive of the two parts, so it makes sense to put the more delicate part on the cheaper side.
While I generally agree, Windows licenses are tied to your motherboard, and that can level the playing field a bit.
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
18,501
7,366
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And here i was expecting ddr4>3000mhz
Looks like AMD farmed out IMC design, which . . . kinda sucks. At least it'll support some memory overclocking beyond DDR4-2400. You have to wonder whether DDR4-2933 will be enough for 8c/16t in only two channels.

So does anyone know if the mounting hole pitches match FM2+? The socket size does.
 

el etro

Golden Member
Jul 21, 2013
1,581
14
81
The problem is that even your finger can break the fragile LGA contacts. But the CPU itself is breakproof.

I had both AM3 and AM3+ processors and their pins was much, much harder to break.
 

crashtech

Diamond Member
Jan 4, 2013
9,980
1,710
136
While I generally agree, Windows licenses are tied to your motherboard, and that can level the playing field a bit.
That's a great point, I bought a retail version of Windows just to avoid that problem, and it's already proved its worth.
 

LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
28,520
1,573
126
The problem is that even your finger can break the fragile LGA contacts. But the CPU itself is breakproof.

I had both AM3 and AM3+ processors and their pins was much, much harder to break.
If the AM4 pins are as robust as the pins on the current FX chips...

For some reason I get the impression that it will use more delicate pins.
 

Shehriazad

Senior member
Nov 3, 2014
555
2
46
Is everyone here on the clumsy side or why is it an issue to have pins on the board instead of the CPU?


I mean sheesh...people trying to find all kinds of reasons to nitpick. If you handle the CPU and Board properly...how is anything gonna bend? The only time I ever saw a bent pin was when a friend tried to build a PC and dropped the CPU...but you don't generally drop whole motherboards in a way that they would land on their pins.....
I mean...generally you don't drop anything...but yea.
 

scannall

Golden Member
Jan 1, 2012
1,845
1,377
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Is everyone here on the clumsy side or why is it an issue to have pins on the board instead of the CPU?


I mean sheesh...people trying to find all kinds of reasons to nitpick. If you handle the CPU and Board properly...how is anything gonna bend? The only time I ever saw a bent pin was when a friend tried to build a PC and dropped the CPU...but you don't generally drop whole motherboards in a way that they would land on their pins.....
I mean...generally you don't drop anything...but yea.
I think it's just another angle to pick on something. After over 40 years of computer repairs and upgrades, I've discovered that if you're sober and pay attention then things don't get bent.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
52,611
7,288
126
No it doesn't, it only supports 2133. You can overclock higher than that, but it's not supported.
Funny how his argument flip-flops, depending on whether you're talking about Windows 7, or DDR4-4000. (Claiming that Windows 7 is "unsupported" and "legacy", when docs clearly list it as a supported platform for Skylake, at least in Intel's video drivers.)
 

IntelUser2000

Elite Member
Oct 14, 2003
7,798
2,665
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No it doesn't, it only supports 2133. You can overclock higher than that, but it's not supported.
I was just pointing out that in case of AMD, even with AM4 the max speed is DDR4-2400, overclocked. Non overclocked its DDR4-2400.

Officially Skylake is DDR4-2133, but with overclock it can go as high as RAM modules are available. The deficiency that AMD has regarding memory seems to carry out to their GPUs, with either memory utilization being low or uarch being inefficient in case of Fury parts.
 

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