Garage/workshop build (lots of images)

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by franksta, Aug 30, 2012.

  1. ViviTheMage

    ViviTheMage Lifer

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    dude, jealous...sweet looking garage.
     
  2. franksta

    franksta Golden Member

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    I completely forgot to post that picture.
    [​IMG]

    Working on the back wall first so I can get my wall cabinets mounted. I'm waiting on my father in law to be available to help me with the drywall. He's got a trailer we will use to get the big 4'x12' pieces.

    What are you calling "so close" to the property line? It's roughly 10-12 feet away from it. I don't know what the minimum allowed would be. Mine is that far away due to all of the fill dirt required to level the area.
     
    #52 franksta, Nov 7, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2013
  3. SuperSix

    SuperSix Elite Member

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    Have you considered pressboard or something similar in place of drywall?
     
  4. franksta

    franksta Golden Member

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    I considered OSB. I'll need to look into pressboard as I'm not familiar with it. I'm open to suggestions though, I haven't committed to anything yet.
     
  5. SuperSix

    SuperSix Elite Member

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    I imagine drywall will get dicked up pretty bad over the years.. OSB would fare much better, and give a better surface for mounting hooks etc to store things on the wall.
     
  6. Zargon

    Zargon Lifer

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    1/4 acrylic is pretty cheap now a days too, which you could run along the lower wall to prevent dings and its washable
     
  7. franksta

    franksta Golden Member

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    My concern, perhaps unfounded, with the OSB is that after I paint it the texture would still show. I know the drywall would look good even though not as resilient.
     
  8. SuperSix

    SuperSix Elite Member

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    My taste would be OSB unpainted. You are correct though - if you want a complete finished look, drywall or much more expensive sanded interior plywood would be best.
     
  9. sdifox

    sdifox No Lifer

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    10-12 you should be safe. Mobile Alabama code says 8, I imagine your city code is similar.
     
  10. skyking

    skyking Lifer

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    It will show. I suggest doing the bottom 2' in something tough, or putting something over the drywall down low. Jacks and things of that nature are the big culprits for dinging up stuff. My design has a 1' concrete stemwall. That did the trick.
     
  11. phucheneh

    phucheneh Diamond Member

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    The texture definitely still shows. The wood chip 'grain' is less noticeable if you put the ribbed roofing side out...but, well, then you got ribbed walled. For your pleasure.

    Also, you gotta paint OSB with increasingly disappearing oil base paint (don't want anything with water in it).

    I'd just go with drywall. Unpainted OSB would work, too, but wouldn't even ambient humidity eventually start delaminating little pieces of it?

    edit: depending on the price of steel, you could always just grab some sheet steel and screw it to the bottom few feet of wall as protection. Either get stainless or just paint it.
     
  12. JCH13

    JCH13 Diamond Member

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    I've got some OSB in a few walls of my garage the previous owner used to make some additions. It's garbage. Falls apart and the texture does show.

    The drywall inside my garage still looks really nice after 20+ years, even with no dehumidifier and water intrusion. Just don't bring the drywall straight to the concrete floor, leave a 1-2in gap.

    Still, the REAL reason to use drywall is that is will protect the structure of the building from fire better than virtually anything else. If you wall it with wood you're just adding tinder. Drywall might buy the FD enough time to put out the fire before the structure is involved.

    My employer is refitting wearhouse space to garage space. We spec'd two layers of 5/8in drywall with insulation. A so-called '2-hour fire wall.'
     
  13. RagingBITCH

    RagingBITCH Lifer

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    Dood...that's a fucking mancave times 80.
     
  14. franksta

    franksta Golden Member

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    Liftmaster 3800 (youtube video) garage door opener. The door is 16'x8'. Very quick and quiet. Plus pretty easy to install. I smashed my thumb with the hammer and that took a lot of fight out of me.
     
  15. SyndromeOCZ

    SyndromeOCZ Senior member

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    Ha.. you don't have to use oil... There are many other alternatives to water based paint than oil. You have lacquer based, and epoxy. I've taken OSB and sanded the ink off of it then stained it up and cleared it with lacquer in few different garages.

    If you are going for strength, then put epoxy on it, you put a good coat of high solids epoxy then it wont even scratch. I've got some drywall that I put high solids epoxy on and I can rub a coin to it until its 1/4 gone without hurting my walls.
     
  16. phucheneh

    phucheneh Diamond Member

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    Good to know...what's it cost, though? Epoxy, that is...I don't think I'd want to deal with lacquer.

    I mean, I can find the price per gallon, but there's the matter of coverage. Oil-base doesn't seem to want to spread very much...but it does provide a very nice water-repelling barrier (and is pretty cheap). Doesn't keep all the little chips in place, though- something that would harden more and provide a better outer layer would definitely by preferable.

    I love OSB for its strength and price. But I've yet to find a way to totally keep it from peeling if it's exposed...do you just use the standard 'garage floor' paint? I've never even thought to try it on something other than concrete.

    You may have the water-based paint issue if pieces are just randomly delaminating. Like I said above, oil prevents that; but it doesn't protect against direct damage. Hence why I'm curious about epoxy now.
     
  17. SyndromeOCZ

    SyndromeOCZ Senior member

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    The coverage of the epoxy should be listed on the gallon buckets. I sometimes add a little solvent to it so it will roll out better, and it will stretch it more. This wont effect the strength to much in the situation of covering OSB.

    Yes its a garage floor paint, but I don't get it from homedepot. I generally use Devoe. There are enough different kinds I could spend days telling you about them, but something like this would work good.

    A 2 gallon kit of the above epoxy should cover 12.5 sheets of plywood according to spec. But the ply wood is going to absorb the paint more than concrete would so you might not get as much coverage. And it would help to add some xylene to it to help it roll out smoothly.
     
  18. franksta

    franksta Golden Member

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    [​IMG]

    Here's my audio upgrade. I told my dad I was looking to get a new one since ye olde Kenwood was showing it's age. He was literally inches away from donating his old switch and receiver to goodwill. The next thing I know he's dropping them off at my house.

    The laptop was my wife's old machine. It's around 6 or 7 years old now, a 17" Alienware Pentium M. I think I got that right. Running Fedora Core 17 now.
     
    #68 franksta, Nov 11, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2013
  19. waggy

    waggy No Lifer

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    it turned out great. I figure if i win the lotto i will do something like this.
    hehe maybe after the kitchen and woof (next years projectS)
     
  20. MagickMan

    MagickMan Diamond Member

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    Looks great OP. Don't skimp on sealant for the floor, though. Mine has already survived some really nasty drops and spills, and it's none the worse for wear.

    [​IMG]

    I went with J&S, great product and company. http://www.vortexsprayonliner.com/article/4/floors
     
  21. franksta

    franksta Golden Member

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    I'm really indecisive about what I'm going to do for the floor. The short term plan is "nothing" but when I get serious about a project car I'll make a decision.

    The next repair I'm doing is a new passenger side mirror on my Grand Marquis. After that is 100,000 mile maintenance on my wife's car. I'll do the floor before I get a lift, build a '32 Ford, or LS swap into something.
     
  22. SyndromeOCZ

    SyndromeOCZ Senior member

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    May I ask how much they charge per sq foot?
     
  23. franksta

    franksta Golden Member

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    Lame update but it's hard to get stuff done and watch my 3 year old daughter at the same time.

    [​IMG]
    The first of 3 recessed lights.
     
    #73 franksta, Nov 17, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2013
  24. phucheneh

    phucheneh Diamond Member

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    Just FYI- when I manage to get my own shop space (probably a little 2-4 bay shop on a lease or something), and it's way less nice than your garage, I may have to come over there and punch you.

    At least you didn't do the whole, like, heating coils in the floor and everything type deal (usually the result of an occasional DIYer with waaaay too much time and money). You're more reasonable than that, which leads me to believe you will actually do work in there. :D

    Magick- that is clearly a living room (or 'man cave,' to use a term I find a little too anus-sounding) with a easily washable floor. :p

    While you might be fooling the wife (no dirty living room and a clean garage- what a man!) you need to go find something greasy to haul in there. Then take it apart and make an enormous mess. For bonus points; put it back together (recommended but not required :awe:).
     
  25. franksta

    franksta Golden Member

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    I thought about the heated floor but didn't have the money and it doesn't get that cold here. Although my dad did just call yesterday and offered a wood burning stove. Ha.

    I don't like the term man cave either. I think it has connotations of doing nothing, like hibernating to a bear.

    EDIT: I need a new BIOS battery for my laptop. I had to revert back to my ipod yesterday for installing the light.