Ryzen 5 Upgrade Options?

EXCellR8

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Sep 1, 2010
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I'm tossing around the idea of upgrading the quad core Ryzen 5 1500X processor in my B350 gaming computer, since the 2nd gen 6-core plus processors are so cheap; the performance in some games does lack a bit as configured. This computer also uses the other Vega 64 card so upping the processing power should result in better overall gaming performance.

I was thinking of buying the 2600X which can be had for around $200, but I also like the idea of having the lower TDP 2600 to OC. The pricing difference is negligible though, so I might as well grab the X model. I'll be keeping the 1700 in my main computer for the time being, as I plan to rebuild whenever Zen 2 is released, otherwise I'd just move it to the B350 machine.

Or is there something else I'm not considering?
 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
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Upgrade your bios first, and check that YOUR motherboard will support the 2600x, most will with a bios upgrade.
 

whm1974

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Personally I would go straight to the 2700 or 2700x, but then again that is just me. You will have to decide if going from a 4c/8t CPU to a 6t/12 one will give enough performance to be worthwhile to do.
 

mjdupuis

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Apr 14, 2015
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You should get better performance from the 2600x at stock as its boost frequencies will be higher than you'll achieve on an all-core OC on the 2600. I'd pair either one with a better cooler but the 2600x is def worth the difference if you don't plan to upgrade the cooler.
 
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EXCellR8

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Upgrade your bios first, and check that YOUR motherboard will support the 2600x, most will with a bios upgrade.
yessir, it does.

System already uses a pretty decent AIO liquid cooling. Sorry I DEFINITELY should have mentioned that. sounds like the 2600X is the obvious choice for 6c/12t
 

krumme

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Oct 9, 2009
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When exxctly do you need the 6c? What is the consequence and practical meassured benefit here?

Since tdp also plays a role why not a 6/8c 7nm comming in a year you can plug into that cheap b350. will give you tons of perf at aprox same tdp as a 1500x. Its not like 6 years of no progress of same 4c stuff.

Pretty darn funny what you can do with that cheap b350 vs what 7700k on a z2700 had of future.
 

EXCellR8

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If there's 7nm planned for AM4 and not AM4+/Zen 2 then I'd gladly wait for it. I was not aware this would be an option.
 

IEC

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If there's 7nm planned for AM4 and not AM4+/Zen 2 then I'd gladly wait for it. I was not aware this would be an option.
Socket shouldn't change through 2020 at minimum. I'd expect 7nm and (maybe) 7nm+ chips for AM4. So if you can wait it out, do so. Otherwise, I've seen the 2600X as cheap as $165 on sale which is a steal for a top-end hexacore chip.
 
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May 11, 2008
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I'm tossing around the idea of upgrading the quad core Ryzen 5 1500X processor in my B350 gaming computer, since the 2nd gen 6-core plus processors are so cheap; the performance in some games does lack a bit as configured. This computer also uses the other Vega 64 card so upping the processing power should result in better overall gaming performance.

I was thinking of buying the 2600X which can be had for around $200, but I also like the idea of having the lower TDP 2600 to OC. The pricing difference is negligible though, so I might as well grab the X model. I'll be keeping the 1700 in my main computer for the time being, as I plan to rebuild whenever Zen 2 is released, otherwise I'd just move it to the B350 machine.

Or is there something else I'm not considering?
Make sure that your board has enough EDC reserves for the 2600X.
The ryzen 2600 i have can manage an all core boost of 3600MHz to 3650 MHz with EDC being 100% in ryzen master.
I have the AB350M uatx version from ASROCK.
If i understand it correctly, the cpu will not get more power from the board if the EDC is at 100%.
This is a safety measure to protect the board from burning up.
So, if you try to overclock be sure that the vrm have enough cooling.
I am not sure if there is a setting in the bios that allows to get more power from the vrm.
But if there is, some extra cooling precautions might be needed or you need to buy a motherboard capable of delivering more power.
 
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scannall

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Jan 1, 2012
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Socket shouldn't change through 2020 at minimum. I'd expect 7nm and (maybe) 7nm+ chips for AM4. So if you can wait it out, do so. Otherwise, I've seen the 2600X as cheap as $165 on sale which is a steal for a top-end hexacore chip.
I would expect them to change in 2021. For DDR5 and PCie4/5. Depending on sales maybe 2 chipsets in 2020?
 

EXCellR8

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Sep 1, 2010
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The board has a modest set of OC tools, so I think going with an X SKU is probably the way to go. I'll gladly wait around for the next round.

Thanks fellas.
 
May 11, 2008
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https://hothardware.com/reviews/amd-2nd-generation-ryzen-processors-and-x470-chipset-review?page=8

The 4xx boards are mostly supplied with more powerful and capable vrm.
Here it is explained best what it all means , the options in ryzen master :


https://hothardware.com/reviews/amd-2nd-generation-ryzen-processors-and-x470-chipset-review?page=8

The latest version of Ryzen Master includes a number of interesting and worthwhile updates and features. We'll quote AMD directly to keep it simple:
  • Package Power Tracking (“PPT”): The PPT% indicates the distance to maximum power that can be delivered to the socket by the motherboard across various voltage rails. 100% indicates maximum capacity.
  • Thermal Design Current (“TDC”): The TDC% indicates the distance to maximum current that can be delivered by the motherboard voltage regulators when they have been heated to a steady state through sustained operation. 100% indicates maximum capacity.
  • Electrical Design Current (“EDC”): The EDC% indicates distance to maximum current that can be delivered by the motherboard voltage regulators in a peak/transient condition. 100% indicates maximum capacity.
  • Fastest Core Detection: The stars represent the fastest core(s) within each CCX, while the gold star indicates the fastest silicon in the entire device. The circles represent the second fastest cores within the CCXes. This can be extremely useful for breaking single-core clock speed records.
  • Per CCX Overclocking
You'll notice that Ryzen Master presents some new data to the user, as outlined in the list above, which is helpful for users to note only achieve higher overclocks, but see exactly what is the limiting factor. Per CCX Overclocking is now available for all Ryzen processors -- including the originals. And the fastest cores on the chip are labeled clearly, so there's no guesswork.

Idle power is somewhat improved with the 2nd Generation Ryzen processor, but peak power is actually somewhat higher. The move to Global Foundaries' 12nm LP process allowed AMD to reduce the voltage at a given frequncy, which will reduce power consumption clock-for-clock, but because AMD also took the opportunity to increase frequencies and maintain higher boost clocks on more cores, peak power consumption is actually higher than the original Ryzen parts.
 

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