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Intel Comet Lake Thread

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jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
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That brings me back to what I was saying earlier, then . . . no point in making a 10c Comet Lake die with the iGPU, given the 14nm wafer shortage. Unless Intel plans of fusing off two cores for the mobile version?
Yeah disabling two cores for mobile.
 

NTMBK

Diamond Member
Nov 14, 2011
8,523
1,385
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el oh el



That brings me back to what I was saying earlier, then . . . no point in making a 10c Comet Lake die with the iGPU, given the 14nm wafer shortage. Unless Intel plans of fusing off two cores for the mobile version?
AMD are bringing 8 cores to mobile with Renoir. If Intel wants to stay ahead, they need to go to 10.
 

A///

Member
Feb 24, 2017
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I'm awfully curious of the thermals that 10 core K processor will have. o_O Pricing is going to be key on these. If Intel launches soon as possible with just the right price, they may sway some customers who were waiting for Zen 3. Obviously single thread performance, and gaming for that matter, would have to have a healthy gap between it and the 9th gen in accordance with a reasonable price to be worth it.
 

IntelUser2000

Elite Member
Oct 14, 2003
6,552
1,078
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That slide is telling us that the 5GHz ST Turbo and 4.7GHz MT Turbo of the 9900K isn't reached in the tested scenarios.

WebXPRT and TouchXPRT is likely more bursty so the 9900K might come very close to its boost clocks there.

Cinebench doesn't scale 100% with cores meaning its a combination of 2 extra cores plus higher achieved clocks.

SpecCPU numbers sound a bit high and the new compiler might be responsible for 3-4% of that.

Thermal Velocity Boost numbers are completely unrealistic for workloads.

Intel is truly squeezing everything out of SKL 14nm. They went from using a hand squeezer to the industrial scale vice used to crush cars and trucks.
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
14,032
3,221
136
Now hold on, this might be Intel addressing the TDP controversy plaguing the industry and producing realistic or excess figures to help consumers
Note that Coffee Lake-S is listed as 95W/210W. 210W is the max PL2 value. Remember all the power consumption controversies surrounding the 9900k at launch, and the reviewers who were getting different numbers depending on what were the default settings from board OEMs? AT had to rebench their 9900k with a different board because their initial test was on a Z370 that was adhering to PL2 values of 210W. Today, most boards will make a 9900K into a 160-170W TDP CPU unless the user specifies something else in the UEFI. The lowest "normal" TDP is 95W.

So now we have the 10900K which is at a minimum going to pull 125W, with a PL2 of 250W. So if you want that sweet, sweet ~5 GHz 10900K all-core overclock, you're gonna get power figures at or near PL2: 250W. Holy crap. Push above 5 GHz to try to hit the max turbo on all cores and I could see 300W easily.
 

Ottonomous

Senior member
May 15, 2014
517
249
116
That slide is telling us that the 5GHz ST Turbo and 4.7GHz MT Turbo of the 9900K isn't reached in the tested scenarios.

WebXPRT and TouchXPRT is likely more bursty so the 9900K might come very close to its boost clocks there.

Cinebench doesn't scale 100% with cores meaning its a combination of 2 extra cores plus higher achieved clocks.

SpecCPU numbers sound a bit high and the new compiler might be responsible for 3-4% of that.

Thermal Velocity Boost numbers are completely unrealistic for workloads.

Intel is truly squeezing everything out of SKL 14nm. They went from using a hand squeezer to the industrial scale vice used to crush cars and trucks.
They'll squeeze pockets too, expect this thing to drop at 550USD minimum as a replacement but what if they they place it a tier above the 9900K...

Note that Coffee Lake-S is listed as 95W/210W. 210W is the max PL2 value. Remember all the power consumption controversies surrounding the 9900k at launch, and the reviewers who were getting different numbers depending on what were the default settings from board OEMs? AT had to rebench their 9900k with a different board because their initial test was on a Z370 that was adhering to PL2 values of 210W. Today, most boards will make a 9900K into a 160-170W TDP CPU unless the user specifies something else in the UEFI. The lowest "normal" TDP is 95W.

So now we have the 10900K which is at a minimum going to pull 125W, with a PL2 of 250W. So if you want that sweet, sweet ~5 GHz 10900K all-core overclock, you're gonna get power figures at or near PL2: 250W. Holy crap. Push above 5 GHz to try to hit the max turbo on all cores and I could see 300W easily.
I was being facetious but thanks for the education m8. I wasn't sure about that 210W figure.
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
7,178
862
126
Am getting the impression that Comet Lake-S is going to launch at CES. Strangely not Comet Lake U LPDDR4 though if that ends up being the case. (10610U and 10810U)

Kind of tempting fate here, given the shortage, if it includes the 8 and 10 core parts. Even if it's a paper launch.
 

IntelUser2000

Elite Member
Oct 14, 2003
6,552
1,078
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Uh, there is a difference with the chipset coming with Comet Lake. 300 series chipset only supports the 9560 802.11ac CNVi. 400 series supports the AX200 802.11ax CNVi or WiFi 6. Slides show it as a new feature as well.
 

lobz

Senior member
Feb 10, 2017
754
600
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Uh, there is a difference with the chipset coming with Comet Lake. 300 series chipset only supports the 9560 802.11ac CNVi. 400 series supports the AX200 802.11ax CNVi or WiFi 6. Slides show it as a new feature as well.
Finally. That is a massive leap, the masses have been waiting for for that for a long time. Having to buy a new motherboard is the least we can do to support these innovations! :) :) :)

(I know the newer wifi in itself is useful, I'm just addressing the 'meh' factor here :D)
 
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IntelUser2000

Elite Member
Oct 14, 2003
6,552
1,078
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Finally. That is a massive leap, the masses have been waiting for for that for a long time. Having to buy a new motherboard is the least we can do to support these innovations! :) :) :)
His whole argument about why it can't be DMI x8 hinges on saying that CML PCH has zero changes, when its not true. Yea its comparatively minor, but actually very important in the mobile market its aimed at.

Desktop motherboards use the previous generation AC chipset with CNVi, and most boards that had WiFi used the compatible 9560AC chip. It'll likely be updated with the CNVi AX201 when CML chipset arrives.
 
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lobz

Senior member
Feb 10, 2017
754
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His whole argument about why it can't be DMI x8 hinges on saying that CML PCH has zero changes, when its not true. Yea its comparatively minor, but actually very important in the mobile market its aimed at.

Desktop motherboards use the previous generation AC chipset with CNVi, and most boards that had WiFi used the compatible 9560AC chip. It'll likely be updated with the CNVi AX201 when CML chipset arrives.
Hence my absolute meh about the desktop CML :)
 

IntelUser2000

Elite Member
Oct 14, 2003
6,552
1,078
126
Hence my absolute meh about the desktop CML :)
Some components are updated way too frequently. I use the Centrino Advanced-N Wireless Desktop 6205 for my computer.

It seems like I can go buy a 9260 or AX 200(non-CNVi) from eBay or something and update it, since the PCIe card is just an adapter from an M.2 E module which will work with any of their mobile WiFi chipsets.

But why would I do that? I rarely transfer data over network, and I can max out download speeds of our 150Mbit connection 2 rooms away and downstairs from the router.

Some AX routers are expensive as full computers! $600, like what the hell? I thought $200 cdn I spent for the Netgear R7000 was a lot.
 

lobz

Senior member
Feb 10, 2017
754
600
106
Some components are updated way too frequently. I use the Centrino Advanced-N Wireless Desktop 6205 for my computer.

It seems like I can go buy a 9260 or AX 200(non-CNVi) from eBay or something and update it, since the PCIe card is just an adapter from an M.2 E module which will work with any of their mobile WiFi chipsets.

But why would I do that? I rarely transfer data over network, and I can max out download speeds of our 150Mbit connection 2 rooms away and downstairs from the router.

Some AX routers are expensive as full computers! $600, like what the hell? I thought $200 cdn I spent for the Netgear R7000 was a lot.
But with motherboards with integrated AX coming to the market, don't expect the router prices not to follow.
What a nice English sentence =D
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
14,032
3,221
136
The AX200 seems to be a bit buggy, at least on the 5 GHz band while connecting to older AC routers. And not all the time. It really likes low channels though. In any case do not be in a big hurry to use first-gen AX200 hardware. Hopefully Intel will update the hardware or . . . something.
 

happy medium

Lifer
Jun 8, 2003
14,288
437
126
Intel Unveils 10th Gen High-End Mobility CPUs With 8 Cores, 16 Threads – Breaking The 5 GHz Barrier on Gaming Notebooks.

Intel-10th-Gen-vs-AMD-Ryzen-3000-Mobility-CPUs_Performance_4-Custom-410x136.pngIntel-10th-Gen-vs-AMD-Ryzen-3000-Mobility-CPUs_Performance_3-Custom-410x136.pngIntel-10th-Gen-vs-AMD-Ryzen-3000-Mobility-CPUs_Performance_2-Custom-410x135.pngIntel-10th-Gen-vs-AMD-Ryzen-3000-Mobility-CPUs_Performance_1-Custom-410x135.png

looks like Intel has some real nice CPU's for notebooks incoming soon.

I'm rather impressed by the battery life.
 

EXCellR8

Diamond Member
Sep 1, 2010
3,461
579
126

Several motherboard manufacturers revealed that the 10-core breaks the 300-watt mark at maximum load. Not surprisingly, the 9900KS already exceeded the 250-watt mark in scenarios of this kind. This information has nothing in common with the TDP, which is rumored to be 125 watts. Up to 4.9 GHz Turbo clock for all 20 threads on the flagship makes this value increase significantly in everyday life depending on the load.
power up!
 

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