Baltimore’s Francis Scott Key Bridge collapsed after being hit by a cargo boat.

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Zorba

Lifer
Oct 22, 1999
14,526
9,899
136
Even if they rebuild the exact same bridge, I would be surprised if they did not remove everything old (that didn't fall).
Will probably be all new because the birdge doesn't meat many current design standards. But if they were to rebuild it, more than likely the currently standing gritter spans would be reused. Those spans weren't physically connected to the truss section that failed, except for the last span sharing a pier cap.
 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
62,859
11,262
136
Speaking of this ship was made by Hyundai Heavy Industries, how come no one anywhere is talking shit about Hyundai and what very well could have been a manufacturing/design failure, while we get national news every time a 25 year old Boeing aircraft has a flat tire.

Should also be talking about the shit regulations that allow these massive ships to only have one source of electrical power, steering, and thrust. A 30 second black out would never be allowed on any aircraft, modern aircraft can transfer buses without even making the lights flicker (and do at least 4 times every flight).
In the late 80s, I worked at the USS/Posco steel mill in Pittsburg, CA. We installed a brand-new overhead crane in a building...it was built by Hyundai Heavy Industries...nice crane, but it just never worked quite right. Electrical problems that couldn't be solved 100%...blew breakers at the most inopportune times...like under a critical load, always one wheel on the bridge that never quite touched the rail until it was heavily loaded...but travelling with that heavy load always put a strain on the electric motors...and when you least expected it...that could blow breakers. The mill's electrical crews worked on it for the entire year I ran it...never did quite get it right.
 
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Torn Mind

Lifer
Nov 25, 2012
11,636
2,650
136
Speaking of this ship was made by Hyundai Heavy Industries, how come no one anywhere is talking shit about Hyundai and what very well could have been a manufacturing/design failure, while we get national news every time a 25 year old Boeing aircraft has a flat tire.

Should also be talking about the shit regulations that allow these massive ships to only have one source of electrical power, steering, and thrust. A 30 second black out would never be allowed on any aircraft, modern aircraft can transfer buses without even making the lights flicker (and do at least 4 times every flight).
The "system" does not interfere with commerce if it can help it. Hyundai, being an ally's key manufacturer, is being protected, even if unintentionally and unknowingly, by the press. Boeing gets on the news because they keep having problems and they probably murdered someone.
 

skyking

Lifer
Nov 21, 2001
22,004
4,760
146
Big shoutout for Baltimore's mayor. He is all over his job, and responded to the conservitards labeling him as the "DEI Mayor" by saying they are too chickenshit to use the N word. He called them out again today on Face The Nation.
If anything good came from this, it was giving him some time in the limelight.

EDIT:
Link to transcript.
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/brandon-scott-baltimore-mayor-face-the-nation-transcript-03-31-2024/

MAYOR BRANDON SCOTT: Well, as I've said, already this week, we know. Listen, I am a young black man and young black mayor in this country. We know that there are a lot of racism, folks who don't think I should be in this job. I know that, I've been Black my whole life. I know how racism- racism goes in this country. But my focus is always going to be on those people. I didn't want to be out there that night asking- answering questions about DEI. I'm worried about the loss of life. We know how ridiculous that is. Those folks are afraid as I said this week, to use the N-word.
 

iRONic

Diamond Member
Jan 28, 2006
6,857
2,142
136
When I worked offshore as a helicopter mechanic I watched a crew install a drilling rig on top of a production rig. Same type of barge with the crane just like what they're using there. They welded that shit straight to the top deck! They welded everything else right to the first level!

They came back eight months later and cut it right off. Three weeks later you would've never known there was a drilling derrick on top of that production rig.
@Pohemi

I knew I had a couple of pictures of this stashed somewhere.

This is High Island 571 - a CNG production gas and oil rig that the company I worked for, Air Logistics had the contract to supply helicopter services to back in the mid 80s.

I used to carry one of those cameras with me that you took to get developed at the drugstore.

Snapped these on short final one morning. The crane barge is big enough for it’s own helipad!
 

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iRONic

Diamond Member
Jan 28, 2006
6,857
2,142
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Drilling rig being located on top of the production side.

Living quarters, galley, and pump gennys on the left platform.
 
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Zorba

Lifer
Oct 22, 1999
14,526
9,899
136
I keep watching these videos, thinking..."holy fuck...there's a shit ton of money to be made on this job..." Tide work, overtime/double time...
There is opportunity in chaos. The said thing is, this will likely be done far cheaper than if it has been a planned demo.
 

skyking

Lifer
Nov 21, 2001
22,004
4,760
146
Drilling rig being located on top of the production side.

Living quarters, galley, and pump gennys on the left platform.
That might be the crane out of Mexico that later came through the canal and up to Seattle. It was commissioned in 1969 and at 1000 tons, the biggest thing going.
When it got to Seattle it had a helipad like that, but it is long gone in remodeling. I remember it has a pretty good machine shop onboard.
 
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eelw

Diamond Member
Dec 4, 1999
9,014
4,334
136
Until a freighter falls off onto the highway like the banking in the Suez Canal incident.
 
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yottabit

Golden Member
Jun 5, 2008
1,364
229
116
I was watching a container ship captain commenting on this and he said ship lost power, then emergency power kicked in 45s after, they immediately tried reversing and dropping anchor. The black smoke is the engine going full tilt. Apparently reversing will turn your ship to the right.

He suggested with hindsight on his side he could see two options, full steam ahead with rudder ful port side to try to clear bridge or starboard to try to avoid bridge but he said given the short time available it is not realistic to expcet people to think calmly.

Also speculated too many refrigerated containers caused the power outage.


link

His ship barely clears the bridge.
My non-expert opinion is that they tried to correct, not considering that the power may cut out again, and got stuck into an overcorrection once it did. That’s what I think I saw in the videos anyway
 

feralkid

Lifer
Jan 28, 2002
16,472
4,543
136
Rather than a bridge.. why don't they try this instead..

Very cool.

Centuries ago they were building them for the Midi-canal in France, for example.


Here's one still in use, crossing over a river:

1280px-Anjodi_on_the_Pont_Canal_de_la_Cesse.jpg
 
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feralkid

Lifer
Jan 28, 2002
16,472
4,543
136
how would this work in a major shipping lane with massive container ships?
50+ foot draft on bigger container ships...not likely to cost less than a kajillion dollars and require tons of unobtainium.

Would certainly cost more than any bridge or tunnel.
 

dainthomas

Lifer
Dec 7, 2004
14,591
3,425
136
Speaking of this ship was made by Hyundai Heavy Industries, how come no one anywhere is talking shit about Hyundai and what very well could have been a manufacturing/design failure, while we get national news every time a 25 year old Boeing aircraft has a flat tire.

Should also be talking about the shit regulations that allow these massive ships to only have one source of electrical power, steering, and thrust. A 30 second black out would never be allowed on any aircraft, modern aircraft can transfer buses without even making the lights flicker (and do at least 4 times every flight).

Navy ships have an aft steering compartment that's always manned in the event of loss of bridge control. I wasn't in engineering, but I assume every ship also has enough backup propulsion to maintain course.