Baltimore’s Francis Scott Key Bridge collapsed after being hit by a cargo boat.

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Nov 17, 2019
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Bridge collapse live updates: 1st portions of bridge to be lifted Saturday

abcnews.go.com.ico
ABC|54 minutes ago
Highly trained demolition crews will begin cutting the top portion of the north side of the collapsed Francis Scott Key Bridge into smaller sections for safe removal by crane. One crane barge and one working barge are staged at the incident to support Saturday's operations.



Torches? Cutting charges? Some kind of super shears?

This ain't no job for recip saws.
 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
62,859
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136

Bridge collapse live updates: 1st portions of bridge to be lifted Saturday

abcnews.go.com.ico
ABC|54 minutes ago
Highly trained demolition crews will begin cutting the top portion of the north side of the collapsed Francis Scott Key Bridge into smaller sections for safe removal by crane. One crane barge and one working barge are staged at the incident to support Saturday's operations.



Torches? Cutting charges? Some kind of super shears?

This ain't no job for recip saws.
Just remember...they have to take it apart very carefully so it can be put back together again to save money and time...

1711834804653.png
 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
62,859
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Likely will use cutting torches for most of it. Maybe angle grinders for odd spots, etc. That steel has to be thick AF though.
Torches...sure. Grinders aren't likely to be used...too time consuming. I thought I saw a picture of some piece of equipment similar to an excavator equipped with a large shear head. NOT certain it was headed for this job.
 
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Nov 17, 2019
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The crane is on a barge on the water and rated at 100,000 tons, so I'd imagine other tools are similarly oversized.
 

Shmee

Memory & Storage, Graphics Cards Mod Elite Member
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Sep 13, 2008
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Sounds like this was a failboat.
 

eelw

Diamond Member
Dec 4, 1999
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Back to Elmo and REUSE!!!! The parts of the bridge that’s still up, wonder how much structural damage there is?
 

hal2kilo

Lifer
Feb 24, 2009
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Torches...sure. Grinders aren't likely to be used...too time consuming. I thought I saw a picture of some piece of equipment similar to an excavator equipped with a large shear head. NOT certain it was headed for this job.
They will probably use those big cutting torches with lots of inert gas to blow out the molten metal. Very impressive if you are near one at a shipyard.
 
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Pohemi

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Oct 2, 2004
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Back to Elmo and REUSE!!!! The parts of the bridge that’s still up, wonder how much structural damage there is?
Even if they rebuild the exact same bridge, I would be surprised if they did not remove everything old (that didn't fall).
 

iRONic

Diamond Member
Jan 28, 2006
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They will probably use those big cutting torches with lots of inert gas to blow out the molten metal. Very impressive if you are near one at a shipyard.
When I worked offshore as a helicopter mechanic I watched a crew install a drilling rig on top of a production rig. Same type of barge with the crane just like what they're using there. They welded that shit straight to the top deck! They welded everything else right to the first level!

They came back eight months later and cut it right off. Three weeks later you would've never known there was a drilling derrick on top of that production rig.
 
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Zorba

Lifer
Oct 22, 1999
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This is clearly a major safety issue if any non essential electrical component can overwhelm ship controls.

It has to be something different.
Speaking of this ship was made by Hyundai Heavy Industries, how come no one anywhere is talking shit about Hyundai and what very well could have been a manufacturing/design failure, while we get national news every time a 25 year old Boeing aircraft has a flat tire.

Should also be talking about the shit regulations that allow these massive ships to only have one source of electrical power, steering, and thrust. A 30 second black out would never be allowed on any aircraft, modern aircraft can transfer buses without even making the lights flicker (and do at least 4 times every flight).
 
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