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YAGT: OMG I love guns

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alkemyst

No Lifer
Feb 13, 2001
83,967
16
81
... except everyone here shoots at that distance and considers it normal.
Maybe you are thinking of small targets? The targets people normally use here are this:
http://www.barbarobersagli.it/pages/catalogo_eng.asp?id=29
55cm is HUGE. It really is not a big deal to at least hit the target.

In the case of my Japanese guest, I taught her and supervised her shooting. Stands to reason she would have done better if taught and supervised by an actual instructor, but like I said, her performance was very much the same as the newbies taught by the instructors seem to have on average.
ISSF and UITS are sanctioning groups for those shooting those long barrelled 22LR pistols.

It's more of elite target shooting than the self-defense/home defense most will practice.
 
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RampantAndroid

Diamond Member
Jun 27, 2004
6,591
3
81
It can hapen in any ammo. Seen it from a winchester who i consider fairly reputable. Same with ive seen federal and winchester rounds fail o fire at all (bad primers). So just cause you have "quality" ammo i wouldnt try it any more than from a tulsa.

All im saying i sjust cause you pay more for a name brand doesnt make you exempt from issues. Just hopefully itll be less likely. Same with if you buy a 2k gun you expect it to be better than a 300 dollar one
Fair enough, but I've never had a bad winchester, PMC, American Eagle or similar round. Some cheaper rounds, every now and then, seem quesitonable.
 

velillen

Platinum Member
Jul 12, 2006
2,120
1
81
Fair enough, but I've never had a bad winchester, PMC, American Eagle or similar round. Some cheaper rounds, every now and then, seem quesitonable.
How do you like the PMC? I bought 1k of em in 9mm (to reuse the brass) and found them to be smoky when shooting. Least more smokey than tulsa or my reloads. Didnt seem any dirtier though.
 

jpeyton

Moderator in SFF, Notebooks, Pre-Built/Barebones
Moderator
Aug 23, 2003
25,375
141
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Fair enough, but I've never had a bad winchester, PMC, American Eagle or similar round. Some cheaper rounds, every now and then, seem quesitonable.
There's really no difference in quality on the low end. I've shot it all; Blazer, PMC, UMC, Fed American Eagle or Blue Box, S&B, WWB. Getting a squib is a crapshoot with any brand, but luckily it doesn't happen very often with factory ammo. Guys who shoot 10,000 rounds/year might run into a few factory squibs, but the rest of us who shoot far less never see them.

For the most part, arguing about which factory ammo is better for punching holes in paper at 25 feet is pointless. Ammo starts to matter a lot more when we're talking about hitting the 10 ring at 200+ yards.
 

Pia

Golden Member
Feb 28, 2008
1,563
0
0
ISSF and UITS are sanctioning groups for those shooting those long barrelled 22LR pistols.

It's more of elite target shooting than the self-defense/home defense most will practice.
Certainly. Anyway, this is why the ranges are the way they are. I don't know why you called it "bizarre" and "absurd" in your previous post.

Most people shooting handguns here are not training for ISSF sports, but freestyle target shooting recreationally with all calibers, full-size and compact guns. I have only ever seen a handful of people shooting a specialized target pistol, and only a small minority uses the sideways target shooting stance. The newbies I mentioned are taught modern isosceles and given normal .22s like Ruger Mk.III to shoot with.
 

irishScott

Lifer
Oct 10, 2006
21,568
2
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How do you like the PMC? I bought 1k of em in 9mm (to reuse the brass) and found them to be smoky when shooting. Least more smokey than tulsa or my reloads. Didnt seem any dirtier though.
I usually shoot PMC as it's the cheapest locally-sold brass-cased ammo (I save my brass for reloading). I never noticed much smokiness (at least not in .380 or .45) compared to other economy brands, but it is significantly dirtier than the next tier. Personally I don't really care as I clean my guns after every range trip regardless.
 

pontifex

Lifer
Dec 5, 2000
43,806
44
91
Does this happen often? What causes it?
never seen it in all my years of shooting, even with surplus ammo.

I've had rounds not fire (.303 British surplus, several .22 LR many years ago, and once with a 9mm). Pull the trigger and nothing happens. That .303 pissed me off because I bought like 5 boxes at a gun show when i bought my first Enfield, and not a single damn round fired. Tried several from each box. Bought a box of commercial .303 and it worked just fine and has worked fine since then with commercial ammo (surplus .303 is pretty much gone now). Dunno if the ammo was just bad or the primers were too hard.

You definitely want to hold the gun in a safe direction at that point because of a delay fire. I've heard it's more common with surplus ammo (ammo that is many, many, many years old) but like I said, never experienced it myself.
 
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Merad

Platinum Member
May 31, 2010
2,586
19
81
So I'm thinkIng about selling my P226. It's the 9mm SCT model with front cocking serrations, Trijicon night sights and 4x Mec-Gar 20 rd mags. Also has original box & papers, a spare set of Hogue grips and a set of Sig standard sights. Only about 800 rounds through it and the finish is flawless.

What does ATOT say it's worth? I don't think I'll be using it much at least for the next few years, but after searching around some I'm not sure I can get enough out of it to make it worth selling...
 

IGemini

Platinum Member
Nov 5, 2010
2,473
2
81
I've had at least four failures total among American Eagle, Winchester WB, and CCI Blazer Brass ammo. Considering two were from Rugers that hadn't been broken in yet, that's not all that bad.

Tap-rack-shoot is fine if the gun stovepipes. It's the rounds that don't go off one needs to worry about.

So I'm thinkIng about selling my P226.
:eek: WANT! :):\:'(

SIGs retain their value pretty well. $1k still sounds reasonable with all you have with it, $900 would be a bargain price. /my2c
 

velillen

Platinum Member
Jul 12, 2006
2,120
1
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So I'm thinkIng about selling my P226. It's the 9mm SCT model with front cocking serrations, Trijicon night sights and 4x Mec-Gar 20 rd mags. Also has original box & papers, a spare set of Hogue grips and a set of Sig standard sights. Only about 800 rounds through it and the finish is flawless.

What does ATOT say it's worth? I don't think I'll be using it much at least for the next few years, but after searching around some I'm not sure I can get enough out of it to make it worth selling...
Didnt the SCT model come with night sights already?

Whats the advantage of front cocking serrations too? (seen a couple times...never understood what they were for)

But you should be able to get $750-800 or more for it. Seems that most of the non standard 226s around where i live go for around that price point. Might be able to get a bit more if your willing to wait. Budsgunshop has em for 790 for a stock 9mm sct (used)
 
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CurseTheSky

Diamond Member
Oct 21, 2006
5,401
1
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My wife has a PT22 that is driving us both nuts. Her Bersa Thunder .22 and my Ruger SR22 both fire Blazer (unjacked standard) and Winchester WB (jacketed HP) with very few problems. The PT22 throws a fit with just about everything. We have about 200 rounds through it so far, and it's gotten a little better, but still the most annoying out of everything we have.

The worst part is, the slide is extremely stiff. So, every time there's a malfunction (FTF is most common, some FTE's / stovepipes) you have to wrestle with it again.

Is there anything that we can try to get it to loosen up aside from painfully putting several hundred more rounds through?
 

Merad

Platinum Member
May 31, 2010
2,586
19
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Didnt the SCT model come with night sights already?

Whats the advantage of front cocking serrations too? (seen a couple times...never understood what they were for)
The Trijicon sights were included, yes. I think front serrations got started in the custom 1911 world. I guess some people in competition prefer racking the slide with a grip forward of the ejection port? I'm really not the biggest fan of them TBH.

My wife has a PT22 that is driving us both nuts. Her Bersa Thunder .22 and my Ruger SR22 both fire Blazer (unjacked standard) and Winchester WB (jacketed HP) with very few problems. The PT22 throws a fit with just about everything. We have about 200 rounds through it so far, and it's gotten a little better, but still the most annoying out of everything we have.

The worst part is, the slide is extremely stiff. So, every time there's a malfunction (FTF is most common, some FTE's / stovepipes) you have to wrestle with it again.

Is there anything that we can try to get it to loosen up aside from painfully putting several hundred more rounds through?
Try CCI MiniMags in it. You do have the slide properly cleaned and lubed, right? If it's really that hard to move you may need to call the manufacturer. But if it's just normal stiff/new springs you could always spend some time racking it by hand to help break things in....
 

pontifex

Lifer
Dec 5, 2000
43,806
44
91
I've had at least four failures total among American Eagle, Winchester WB, and CCI Blazer Brass ammo. Considering two were from Rugers that hadn't been broken in yet, that's not all that bad.

Tap-rack-shoot is fine if the gun stovepipes. It's the rounds that don't go off one needs to worry about.



:eek: WANT! :):\:'(

SIGs retain their value pretty well. $1k still sounds reasonable with all you have with it, $900 would be a bargain price. /my2c
$900 for a used sig 226? what do they run new? I know i've seen new sig 226s (unsure of exact model) for $7-800. sure, they're good guns but i don't think that piddly amount of extras really makes it worth more than a new one.
 

velillen

Platinum Member
Jul 12, 2006
2,120
1
81
$900 for a used sig 226? what do they run new? I know i've seen new sig 226s (unsure of exact model) for $7-800. sure, they're good guns but i don't think that piddly amount of extras really makes it worth more than a new one.
Depends on the exact model of 226 you get. I paid ~750 (ish cant remember exactly) for the standard 226. The elites, sct, mk25 all those models are more. I think the mk25 can be found around the 900 range. the elite i saw at the store i think was over 1k but i cant remember exactly (pr its exact model)
 

BladeVenom

Lifer
Jun 2, 2005
13,540
16
0
I think front serrations got started in the custom 1911 world. I guess some people in competition prefer racking the slide with a grip forward of the ejection port? I'm really not the biggest fan of them TBH.
Front serrations are for a press check, to double check you have a round chambered, not to completely rack the slide.

I think most people just get them for looks. Personally I never cared for them.
 

velillen

Platinum Member
Jul 12, 2006
2,120
1
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Front serrations are for a press check, to double check you have a round chambered, not to completely rack the slide.

I think most people just get them for looks. Personally I never cared for them.
I guess i dont see the point of them at all. I can pull my slide back enough to check if a round is cambered or not with the normal slide. So i guess is there really a time its useful to he them or is just a looks thing more than anything?
 

BladeVenom

Lifer
Jun 2, 2005
13,540
16
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I guess i dont see the point of them at all. I can pull my slide back enough to check if a round is cambered or not with the normal slide. So i guess is there really a time its useful to he them or is just a looks thing more than anything?
Supposedly in a stressful situation when you check to make sure you have a round chambered you are less likely to pull the slide too far back ejecting a round, if you pull on the front of the slide from underneath.
 

IGemini

Platinum Member
Nov 5, 2010
2,473
2
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Front serrations are nice for how I like to do brass checks, which is one-handed, using thumb tension to pull back the slide. It's more to limit all the strength being used in one hand instead of two. A nice feature to have but not a dealbreaker.

$900 for a used sig 226? what do they run new? I know i've seen new sig 226s (unsure of exact model) for $7-800. sure, they're good guns but i don't think that piddly amount of extras really makes it worth more than a new one.
The SCT is the older version of what SIG now calls the TACOPS P226. Pretty much the same thing: fiber/tritium sights with 4 20-round mags, only the new model has a beavertail.

MSRP for the TACOPS is 1300, I see it for 1100 or up in the stores. SCT was listed for 1150. A used basic 226 with 1-2 standard mags would go for 700 used, yeah. The SCT/TAC is the high-end model.
 

velillen

Platinum Member
Jul 12, 2006
2,120
1
81
Supposedly in a stressful situation when you check to make sure you have a round chambered you are less likely to pull the slide too far back ejecting a round, if you pull on the front of the slide from underneath.
hmm interesting. Guess ive never had a situation where id need to do that. Good ot know what the front serrations are for though!
 

Pia

Golden Member
Feb 28, 2008
1,563
0
0
Front serrations make it easier to rack the gun. To rack, I always grab the gun from above (it's more tactically sound than pinch gripping, and shares muscle mechanics with clearing stoppages, even though pinch grip might save a little time in a competition situation). My palm and little finger fall on front serrations while the thumb and index finger fall on rear serrations.

Also, if you were to mount optics, the optics might prevent you from reasonably accessing rear serrations which makes front serrations more valuable.
 
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Merad

Platinum Member
May 31, 2010
2,586
19
81
Getting bored trying to find the gun I'm set on. Arghhhhhhhhh. I really want a sig p226 elite but that sucker costs $1200. :'( Maybe waiting isnt such a bad thing, this way i can get a feel for some other handguns and see if i prefer them.
You mean waiting to save for the P226 Elite? That would be very foolish IMO, since the extra $600 you're spending on the gun could have bought you about 3000 rounds of practice ammo.
 

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