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YAGT: OMG I love guns

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gorcorps

aka Brandon
Jul 18, 2004
30,724
437
126
This is my hearing protection combo. I had custom plugs at one point, but my range bag was stolen.

http://www.amazon.com/Surefire-Sonic.../dp/B004DH65RI
http://www.amazon.com/Howard-Leight-.../dp/B001T7QJ9O
You know I bought those surefire plugs and I really didn't like them. For one, they claim they filter out loud noises without the caps shut which seems to be pure BS. Second, the tri-flange tips aren't made of soft enough material. Any movement of my jaw and I break the seal... compared to my headphones which I just use any soft rubber medium sized tips and they'll stay sealed all day.

Looks like they have different models though and I'm not sure which ones I got. I'm hesitant to try any of the other ones though because I feel like I got suckered into the first pair. Can't even use them with the caps open so may as well just use cheap foamies anyway.
 

jagec

Lifer
Apr 30, 2004
24,442
4
0
So how dangerous is recoil, exactly? When the gun recoils, is it at the instant of the ejection of the bullet (dangerous), or after the bullet leaves (not seemingly dangerous)?
It's only dangerous when people aren't expecting it, and manage to hit themselves in the face with their own gun. The bullet is long gone by the time the gun moves much.



Keep in mind that dropping a loaded gun is always dangerous; although modern guns are designed not to go off when dropped, you should never lose control of your weapon or point it in an unsafe direction. Dropping the gun violates both of those.
 

Kelvrick

Lifer
Feb 14, 2001
18,438
5
81
You know I bought those surefire plugs and I really didn't like them. For one, they claim they filter out loud noises without the caps shut which seems to be pure BS. Second, the tri-flange tips aren't made of soft enough material. Any movement of my jaw and I break the seal... compared to my headphones which I just use any soft rubber medium sized tips and they'll stay sealed all day.

Looks like they have different models though and I'm not sure which ones I got. I'm hesitant to try any of the other ones though because I feel like I got suckered into the first pair. Can't even use them with the caps open so may as well just use cheap foamies anyway.
They come in different sizes, so you might just need a different size. I much prefer these over the foamies for convenience factor. So much easier to just pop them in rather than having to squeeze the foamies to get them in correctly. Too many people leave them shallow.

They seem to work well enough with electronic muffs. Not as good as my custom set, but I'm not ready to drop another 60 bucks a pair on those.
 

BladeVenom

Lifer
Jun 2, 2005
13,540
16
0
The only guns I've seen that have dangerous recoil are the .460 S&W and .500 S&W. The recoil is enough that some people can barely hang on to them and end up shooting the gun another time trying to hang on. There's several youtube videos of that.

With rifles, don't put your eye too close to the scope.
 

gorcorps

aka Brandon
Jul 18, 2004
30,724
437
126
They come in different sizes, so you might just need a different size. I much prefer these over the foamies for convenience factor. So much easier to just pop them in rather than having to squeeze the foamies to get them in correctly. Too many people leave them shallow.
Ah, well I work in a steel mill so easy access to the foamies and lots of practice getting them in properly and quick. Maybe that's why I just keep reverting back to those.
 

velillen

Platinum Member
Jul 12, 2006
2,120
1
81
W
How do you guys feel about revovers?
I love my revolver. S&W 19-3. I usually go through 100-150 (of 357 mag) rounds when i go to the range. Only issue i have ever had with it is that if im chain firing it after around 20 rounds the cases dont cool down and dont just slid out of the cylinder anymore but rather take a bit to get out. And thats a minor issue and literally only if im shooting and instantly reloading and shooting again. Otherwise the gun has been firing just fine since the 70's.

But semi-auto vs revolver is a topic long debated. Depends on your use...for just a range gun it doesnt matter. but for carry or home defense...well you can get som eheated debates :)



1)
For revolver, I would say get a .357 but shoot .38 special out of it. .38 special is waaaay less recoil and will be cheaper than .357. But you also have the option to move up to .357 if you want to. .357 is brutal imo.
I dont find 357mag to be that brutal. Ill shoot my 100-150 rounds or so in an hour or two at the range and not have any issues. Granted i usually fire off 18 rounds then fire off other guns to let the revolver cylinder cool a bit.


For your first gun i wouldnt look at something "cool" looking. But rather go for something dependable and easy to use. A glock that is pretty fool proof isnt that appealing looks wise but itll fire over and over with no issues really. Once you get used to shooting....then you go for the fun guns......or just rent them from a gun range. Firing a S&W 500 is fun, but you can rent one from a range for $10 (my range at least) plus 6 bucks or so for 6 shots. You wont want to fire more than 6 shots anyways.
 
Aug 23, 2000
15,511
1
81
Both will feel significantly different from a 9mm, and anything in .50 caliber is going to kick a hell of a lot harder than 9 or .40. A .45, in a full-frame 1911 is going to feel somewhat between a 9mm and a .40. The 1911's solid metal construction will really help to dampen the .45's recoil.



I'll second this one, can't go wrong with an M&P.




This is also a really good suggestion. A .357 frame can handle any cheap .38 round you want to fire. Be warned though, while a .38 can chamber and fire .357, .357 rounds will damage or destroy the .38 frame.
Uh, most .38 cylinders are to short to put .357 in and be able to close the cylinder. If the bullet protrudes past the cylinder at all and you can close it still, you have a big problem iwth your gun.
 

Merad

Platinum Member
May 31, 2010
2,586
19
81
It's only dangerous when people aren't expecting it, and manage to hit themselves in the face with their own gun. The bullet is long gone by the time the gun moves much.
Recoil itself isn't going to hurt you, but I'd add a qualifier that you have to watch out for the slide, especially with novice shooters or long time revolver shooters. Slide bite is merely unpleasant, but I've seen some people go to fire a semi auto with the thumb of their left hand cocked up right behind the slide.... Firing a round like that would probably send them to the ER.
 
Aug 23, 2000
15,511
1
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If you're just want something that LOOKS badass then you're asking the wrong questions. You should talk to HAL about acquiring deactivated guns to hang on your wall if you just want appearence.

If you want to get real use out of them then there should be less focus on what just looks neat and start thinking about what actually, you know... shoots bullets properly. A Desert Eagle is incredibly expensive and 50 cal rounds are also incredibly expensive. They make "Baby Eagles" which look like smaller Desert Eagles, and they shoot 9mm. IEI also makes polymer frame Desert Eagles in 9mm.
There isn't a polymer framed "Desert Eagle" There is the polymer framed Baby Eagles, which are way different looking. The all steel Baby Eagle is about as close as you can get to the look of the Desert Eagle. The Desert Eagle is a novelty gun. The current generation that you will be able to buy new SUCK. The safety's are either way to slopy or way to tight. The finish on them is terrible. The top rail looks like crap.

So how dangerous is recoil, exactly? When the gun recoils, is it at the instant of the ejection of the bullet (dangerous), or after the bullet leaves (not seemingly dangerous)?
Recoil isn't dangerous unless you're shooting a Jennings/Bryco/Jemminez based gun as the slide can come flying back at you if the retaining pin breaks, which happens. Lorcin hand guns are known to shoot the firing pin back at the shooter. Several people have found out why eye protection is required because of this.
The only guns I've seen that have dangerous recoil are the .460 S&W and .500 S&W. The recoil is enough that some people can barely hang on to them and end up shooting the gun another time trying to hang on. There's several youtube videos of that.

With rifles, don't put your eye too close to the scope.
The recoil of the big calibers isn't dangerous if you know how to shoot them. What is dangerous, especially in the big bore revolvers, is DO NOT USE A THUMBS FORWARD GRIP. The out gasing in rounds like 454 casull, 460XVR, 480 ruger, 500SW is so powerful it will act like a knife and cut the end of your thumb off. I've seen some really nasty wounds because of that.
 

pontifex

Lifer
Dec 5, 2000
43,806
44
91
It's only dangerous when people aren't expecting it, and manage to hit themselves in the face with their own gun. The bullet is long gone by the time the gun moves much.



Keep in mind that dropping a loaded gun is always dangerous; although modern guns are designed not to go off when dropped, you should never lose control of your weapon or point it in an unsafe direction. Dropping the gun violates both of those.
also don't go swinging around to your buddy and be like holy shit with your finger on the trigger sweeping everyone at the range either.
 

pontifex

Lifer
Dec 5, 2000
43,806
44
91
The only guns I've seen that have dangerous recoil are the .460 S&W and .500 S&W. The recoil is enough that some people can barely hang on to them and end up shooting the gun another time trying to hang on. There's several youtube videos of that.

With rifles, don't put your eye too close to the scope.
i wouldn't go solely by caliber. some people can handle recoil differently just because you can handle a .45 just fine doesn't mean that a 100 lb girl can.
 

irishScott

Lifer
Oct 10, 2006
21,568
2
0
i wouldn't go solely by caliber. some people can handle recoil differently just because you can handle a .45 just fine doesn't mean that a 100 lb girl can.
Buddy and I once took my friend and his 100 lb girlfriend shooting. Started her off on a .22, then a .38 special, then a 9mm, and then my .45. I let her know to expect about 3x the recoil (probably an overkill estimation considering we're talking a 1911, but I figured better she be over-prepared than under), and let her at it. She definitely felt the increase in recoil, and it showed in her shooting, but I never saw anything even remotely dangerous.
 

schneiderguy

Lifer
Jun 26, 2006
10,763
32
91
Buddy and I once took my friend and his 100 lb girlfriend shooting. Started her off on a .22, then a .38 special, then a 9mm, and then my .45. I let her know to expect about 3x the recoil (probably an overkill estimation considering we're talking a 1911, but I figured better she be over-prepared than under), and let her at it. She definitely felt the increase in recoil, and it showed in her shooting, but I never saw anything even remotely dangerous.
Yeah out of a 1911 I don't think there's any adults that couldn't handle the recoil of a .45. It seems like it has less muzzle flip than any of the polymer 9mm pistols do at the expensive of a bit more "shove" that you feel in your hand.
 

irishScott

Lifer
Oct 10, 2006
21,568
2
0
Yeah out of a 1911 I don't think there's any adults that couldn't handle the recoil of a .45. It seems like it has less muzzle flip than any of the polymer 9mm pistols do at the expensive of a bit more "shove" that you feel in your hand.
It's heavier. *shrug*

Polymer guns are great for carry, but for home defense I'll take a metal frame every time.
 

schneiderguy

Lifer
Jun 26, 2006
10,763
32
91
Internet prices:

500 rounds of .22 $16-20 (3 to 4 cents per round)
500 rounds of 9mm $100-120 (~20 cents per round)
500 rounds of .40 $140-160 (~30 cents per round)
500 rounds of .45 $160-180 (35+ cents per round)
 

irishScott

Lifer
Oct 10, 2006
21,568
2
0
Thanks :)

So how much could I expect to pay for (for the range):

500 rounds of .22
500 rounds of 9mm
500 rounds of .40
500 rounds of .45

I keep forgetting about all of the associated costs. When someone mentioned .50 rounds costing as much as $1 I kinda got nervous lol.

Also...do different rounds make a big diff in how the gun feels/shoots?
Assuming the cheapest brass-cased ammo:

.22: $30-40
9mm: $100+
.40: $130+
.45: $175+
 

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