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Question Why is my GPU getting such hot temps? is it because of airflow?

Thedinotamer

Junior Member
Dec 19, 2020
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My GPU temps climbs higher and higher when gaming until it reaches about 80 degrees Celsius and crashes. I'm starting to wonder if it's because of airflow. I live in Sweden with about 22-23 degrees in my room. I have a Ryzen 2700x together with a Corsair Hydro H115i PRO RGB AIO in front as exhaust and then a 2070 non super. My fan setup is as followed: top and back fan are both 120mm as intake, then the rad fans are both 140mm as exhaust as previously said. All of this is in a NZXT H500i on my desk. Should I re-configure anything or is it even airflow that is my problem?
 

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daveybrat

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Jan 31, 2000
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Well first off, you've got the fan all backwards. They should be pulling air into the case and exhausting out the back. Second is that NZXT case as it has very limited slots in the front for airflow. If you want great temps, i'd recommend a case with a mesh front.
 

Thedinotamer

Junior Member
Dec 19, 2020
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0
6
I just looked up my case fans in a review, and according to the arrows you can find on them my fans should actually be pulling air out. This should mean that I have "negative" airflow right? I need to check where my rad fans are blowing still..
 

daveybrat

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Jan 31, 2000
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Now that i look at that picture again, i think the rear and top fan are blowing out. If the radiator fans are also blowing out then yes, you have "negative" or bad airflow.
 

Thedinotamer

Junior Member
Dec 19, 2020
16
0
6
Just tested putting paper towel in front of the little holes that are supposed to bring air out or into the case through the front depending on what side the fans are facing, and it seems to pull air into the case. Which is weird because my temps are still bad even though I supposedly have "neutral" airflow. Should I check the speed of the fans? Maybe they are not blowing hard enough to pull the air through the rad?
 

daveybrat

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Jan 31, 2000
5,344
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Just tested putting paper towel in front of the little holes that are supposed to bring air out or into the case through the front depending on what side the fans are facing, and it seems to pull air into the case. Which is weird because my temps are still bad even though I supposedly have "neutral" airflow. Should I check the speed of the fans? Maybe they are not blowing hard enough to pull the air through the rad?
Yes, definitely check that in the bios. I have all of my front and rear fans set to their highest speed for best cooling.
 

guidryp

Golden Member
Apr 3, 2006
1,147
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I don't like this case. This is a poor case for airflow, unless you use it completely stock.

The front intake is quite choked off. The stock setup for this case is dual exhausts. 1 top and 1 rear, with ZERO intake fans.

This is intended to be a negative pressure case. All exhaust no Intake, then it will just pull air and potentially dust into every crack and crevice. I prefer positive pressure through a filter, to limit/control dust.

But operating in the stock setup with negative pressure, the GPU is cooled by the negative pressure pulling in air through the PCIe slot covers. Which actually does an OK job cooling the GPU.

Any attempt to balance (have neutral) air flow, will limit the air pulled into the PCIe slot covers, and make the GPU hotter.

I assume you essentially balanced the airflow with with the two exhaust fans, and your radiator using intake fans, and thus negligible air is coming in through your PCIe slot covers to cool your GPU.

With this case, if you want to cool your GPU better. Make ALL your fans, into exhausts. That way lots of lovely (dusty) air will come in through your PCIe slot covers, to cool your GPU.
 

Thedinotamer

Junior Member
Dec 19, 2020
16
0
6
I don't like this case. This is a poor case for airflow, unless you use it completely stock.

The front intake is quite choked off. The stock setup for this case is dual exhausts. 1 top and 1 rear, with ZERO intake fans.

This is intended to be a negative pressure case. All exhaust no Intake, then it will just pull air and potentially dust into every crack and crevice. I prefer positive pressure through a filter, to limit/control dust.

But operating in the stock setup with negative pressure, the GPU is cooled by the negative pressure pulling in air through the PCIe slot covers. Which actually does an OK job cooling the GPU.

Any attempt to balance (have neutral) air flow, will limit the air pulled into the PCIe slot covers, and make the GPU hotter.

I assume you essentially balanced the airflow with with the two exhaust fans, and your radiator using intake fans, and thus negligible air is coming in through your PCIe slot covers to cool your GPU.

With this case, if you want to cool your GPU better. Make ALL your fans, into exhausts. That way lots of lovely (dusty) air will come in through your PCIe slot covers, to cool your GPU.
With PCIe slots you mean the gpu brackets that are below the rear fan right?
 

guidryp

Golden Member
Apr 3, 2006
1,147
1,217
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That setup would be horrible for airflow. There's no way enough air could come through PCIe brackets.
Enough for what? For cooling the GPU, this case really needs to run in Negative pressure.

It's a poor airflow case. Best used in stock, negative pressure config, but the AIO cooler messes that up.

If I were saddled with this case and an AIO cooler, I would block 1 rear exhaust fan. Not just unplug/remove, it, but put a piece of cardboard to block that rear exhaust so it doesn't turn into an intake.


What would you recommend?
Getting a better case.
 

guidryp

Golden Member
Apr 3, 2006
1,147
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Personally, another case capable of good airflow.

Otherwise, you can see in this review what they did to (somewhat) improve temperatures by having two intake fans.
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/nzxt-h500i-compact-mid-tower-atx-case,5671-3.html
Gamers Nexus tested adding an Intake and it made GPU cooling worse, because it stopped functioning in negative pressure, and stopped pulling in cooling air through the PCIe slot covers.

Average GPU temperature in the torture test was 52.4 degrees Celsius with the stock fan configuration, and 53C with the top filter removed, a minor change within margin of error. Interestingly, temperature went up quite a bit with the 140mm intake fan added, up to 59.3C and 58.9C with the 120mm fans moved to front intake. This is where the the stock fan configuration starts to make sense. NZXT chose negative pressure because this allows the GPU to draw air in through empty expansion slots, rather than relying on intake from the mostly-sealed front of the case. When front intake fans are added, even ones pointing towards the GPU, this airflow pattern is disrupted and the GPU can no longer pull cool air in from behind the case.
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
14,424
4,977
146
I agree, it's not a case for higher-end components.

It's a case built solely for looks rather than performance, and that's a style of case I would never buy. At a minimum, a case should be able to move enough air with two front intake fans and one rear exhaust. If it can't perform adequately with that setup, I would never even consider it.
 

HardWarrior

Diamond Member
Jan 26, 2004
4,367
7
81
Air. It's the RTX 2070 ARMOR by MSI
Very nice card. I asked because your issue made me think of something very similar that I experienced years ago. When my card started to spike after extended gaming I started to wonder why. It happened because my heat sink had become CAKED with dust. I was so freaked by this event that I started looking for a better way.
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
14,424
4,977
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Very nice card. I asked because your issue made me think of something very similar that I experienced years ago. When my card started to spike after extended gaming I started to wonder why. It happened because my heat sink had become CAKED with dust. I was so freaked by this event that I started looking for a better way.
That case is so closed off, not only doesn't it let air in, it also keeps the dust out as well. ;)
 

guidryp

Golden Member
Apr 3, 2006
1,147
1,217
136
Salvage attempts:

Option One: Negative pressure, cooler GPU, likely warmer CPU. Need to unplug and block rear fan. Pointless having too many fans fighting. Turn up fan curve on front fans. This is the option for the coolest GPU. You don't need additional equipment just a piece of paper/cardboard to block the rear fan from becoming an intake. If going this route, you can remove the front air filters, to improve airflow. Since front will be exhaust, you don't need a filter. This is your best option IMO.
CoolGPU2.jpg

Option Two, neutral(ish) pressure, need 92mm fan. Still not sure it will fit. The point here is to stop trapping heat under the GPU, and reduce back pressure to get some intake from the front. I have seen this solution before, but not in this case. A 92mm fan can mounted over the PCIe slot covers, remove slot covers for better airflow.
CoolGPU3.jpg


If not clear see link below. That 92mm fan under the GPU is running as exhaust, dropped GPU temp by 6 degrees C.
 
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Thedinotamer

Junior Member
Dec 19, 2020
16
0
6
Very nice card. I asked because your issue made me think of something very similar that I experienced years ago. When my card started to spike after extended gaming I started to wonder why. It happened because my heat sink had become CAKED with dust. I was so freaked by this event that I started looking for a better way.
To remove the dust I should get a can of compressed air and blow it on the metal thing above the MSI logo right?
 

Thedinotamer

Junior Member
Dec 19, 2020
16
0
6
Salvage attempts:

Option One: Negative pressure, cooler GPU, likely warmer CPU. Need to unplug and block rear fan. Pointless having too many fans fighting. Turn up fan curve on front fans. This is the option for the coolest GPU. You don't need additional equipment just a piece of paper/cardboard to block the rear fan from becoming an intake. If going this route, you can remove the front air filters, to improve airflow. Since front will be exhaust, you don't need a filter. This is your best option IMO.
View attachment 36012

Option Two, neutral(ish) pressure, need 92mm fan. Still not sure it will fit. The point here is to stop trapping heat under the GPU, and reduce back pressure to get some intake from the front. I have seen this solution before, but not in this case. A 92mm fan can mounted over the PCIe slot covers, remove slot covers for better airflow.
View attachment 36013


If not clear see link. That 92mm fan running as exhaust, dropped GPU temp by 6 degrees C.
Why woudn't it work if I don't block the rear fan? I get the fans fighting thing, but still
 

guidryp

Golden Member
Apr 3, 2006
1,147
1,217
136
Why woudn't it work if I don't block the rear fan? I get the fans fighting thing, but still
It will still work.

But air going out the top and rear fans is not helping to cool your CPU, so you get a hotter CPU.

If you block one of those fans, more air will go out through your radiator, so you get a cooler CPU.
 

Thedinotamer

Junior Member
Dec 19, 2020
16
0
6
It will still work.

But air going out the top and rear fans is not helping to cool your CPU, so you get a hotter CPU.

If you block one of those fans, more air will go out through your radiator, so you get a cooler CPU.
So it should also work by blocking the top fan? In that case i’ll just put my Geralt funko pop on it
 

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