• Guest, The rules for the P & N subforum have been updated to prohibit "ad hominem" or personal attacks against other posters. See the full details in the post "Politics and News Rules & Guidelines."

News [Toms] Intel Announces Socketed 56-Core Cooper Lake Processors

Page 2 - Seeking answers? Join the AnandTech community: where nearly half-a-million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
20,606
8,463
136
Let see if they can sell those 56 Core CPUs less than $10,000 grand(they did half the price of their HEDT line)

Even at $2500 a piece, they loose $5000 total. takes ~50% longer for $1000 more still.
 

Gideon

Senior member
Nov 27, 2007
972
1,497
136
And it seems mainstream Cooper-Lake is cancelled (only some prioritized clients e.g Facebook will get 4S+ chips).

This means Cascade Lake Refresh will battle Milan until Ice-Lake is out. Also means that Intel won't have mainstream chips with over 36 cores till Sapphire Rapids. We don't know the exact release date of Ice-Lake X nor the quantity of higher core parts, but I doubt it's before Q4 nor that the amount of > 32 core chips would be very high (looking at yields).



 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
20,606
8,463
136
And it seems mainstream Cooper-Lake is cancelled (only some prioritized clients e.g Facebook will get 4S+ chips).

This means Cascade Lake Refresh will battle Milan until Ice-Lake is out. Also means that Intel won't have mainstream chips with over 36 cores till Sapphire Rapids. We don't know the exact release date of Ice-Lake X nor the quantity of higher core parts, but I doubt it's before Q4 nor that the amount of > 32 core chips would be very high (looking at yields).
That pretty pathetic. My EPYC 7601 chips now go for $800 on ebay and you can get a dual socket motherboard for them for $560. So for $2160, you can get 64 cores and a motherboard that will beat any Intel setup under $20k. And Rome ? you can get the same motherboard and 2 7742's on ebay for $9560 buy-it-now prices ! That 128 cores that will beat ANY Intel system at any price . And this doesn't count Milan, due out before any new processors from Intel.

Ouch !
 

JasonLD

Senior member
Aug 22, 2017
300
262
106
And it seems mainstream Cooper-Lake is cancelled (only some prioritized clients e.g Facebook will get 4S+ chips).

This means Cascade Lake Refresh will battle Milan until Ice-Lake is out. Also means that Intel won't have mainstream chips with over 36 cores till Sapphire Rapids. We don't know the exact release date of Ice-Lake X nor the quantity of higher core parts, but I doubt it's before Q4 nor that the amount of > 32 core chips would be very high (looking at yields).
Perhaps that is for the better. Whitley platform was a mess with Cooper-Lake and Ice Lake with different level of PCIe support. Now it is just Ice Lake on Whitley platform.
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
16,371
5,282
136
@Gideon

4S and 8S servers are becoming less and less important in datacenters. Without an updated 2S platform until uh whenever IceLake-SP comes out, Intel is in a bad kinda way. Real bad.

Yeah, some specialist clients still want 8S systems but still. Both Intel and AMD had been migrating away from those socket configs for a majority of their customers.
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
8,289
1,355
126
Good time to drop this really bad news.

Perhaps that is for the better. Whitley platform was a mess with Cooper-Lake and Ice Lake with different level of PCIe support. Now it is just Ice Lake on Whitley platform.
But it's not like Intel's going to be able to really sell much of Ice Lake Server. This has to be a OEM revolt over the dual die Cooper's power consumption and the need to use water.

It sounds dumb but perhaps Intel will do 2-for-1 deals with Cooper Lake.
 

JasonLD

Senior member
Aug 22, 2017
300
262
106
Good time to drop this really bad news.



But it's not like Intel's going to be able to really sell much of Ice Lake Server. This has to be a OEM revolt over the dual die Cooper's power consumption and the need to use water.

It sounds dumb but perhaps Intel will do 2-for-1 deals with Cooper Lake.
Like the article said, Cooper Lake delay meant its release will be only a few months apart from Ice Lake, which would have put Cooper Lake in odd spot. If they are going to push Ice Lake as sole processor for Whitley platform, we might see more than 38 cores for Ice Lake processors. We will probably find out in next few months.
 

Zucker2k

Golden Member
Feb 15, 2006
1,185
531
136
This has to be a OEM revolt over the dual die Cooper's power consumption and the need to use water.
Alternatively, it could be good news for 10nm yields. I know you wouldn't even consider that as a possibility.
 

Gideon

Senior member
Nov 27, 2007
972
1,497
136
Alternatively, it could be good news for 10nm yields. I know you wouldn't even consider that as a possibility.
Yes it might indeed mean that Ice-Lake Server is coming sooner and/or in larger numbers (considering the recent leaks as well). But considering the way they delayed both Cooper AND Comet Lake releases I'll believe it when I see it.
If they are going to push Ice Lake as sole processor for Whitley platform, we might see more than 38 cores for Ice Lake processors. We will probably find out in next few months.
I'd be very surprised if we see higher core counts for Ice Lake. They certainly can't just magically spin another die with more cores in such a short notice. By the time they could, Sapphire Rapid should be here. Therefore the only way to add cores would be a MCM package chip like Cooper. Now even if they did that ... Cooper Lake has been rumored about at least since 2018 only to be canned now. No way they'll manage to push out an ice-lake 2-die chip so soon ... Unless Sapphire rapid is also delayed and it happens in second half of 2021, which I also highly doubt.

Regardless, if Intel wants to make Ice-Lake Server look decent in benches they have to it get it out before Milan, which would be a very tight race.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Thunder 57

amrnuke

Senior member
Apr 24, 2019
844
1,027
96
Alternatively, it could be good news for 10nm yields. I know you wouldn't even consider that as a possibility.
When all the stool coming out of me goes downward into the toilet, and a little bit splashes back up, I don't consider that my poop has suddenly changed direction as a whole and defied gravity.

My point being that right now, momentum is all in the wrong direction for Intel, it would be hard to read the ambiguous tea leaves as being a positive sign, though we should obviously allow for good news to be a possibility.
 

joesiv

Member
Mar 21, 2019
75
24
41
It seems more and more that Intel is announcing products/prices for things to compete, or at least appear to be competing with AMD, but without actually allowing for mass availability, or in this case, never really releasing them.

For example, how many 10 series HEDT parts are they actually selling for that more competitive price?
 
  • Like
Reactions: moinmoin and Gideon

mopardude87

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 2018
3,348
1,522
96
A fool and his money are soon parted should be the title of this thread. At least give it consideration as a rename?
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
8,289
1,355
126
Yes it might indeed mean that Ice-Lake Server is coming sooner and/or in larger numbers (considering the recent leaks as well). But considering the way they delayed both Cooper AND Comet Lake releases I'll believe it when I see it.
I am kind of thinking that Whitley is going to be cancelled entirely. They just don't want to admit it right now.

Maybe they will not delay or pull in Eagle Stream/Sapphire Rapids.
 

SammichPG

Member
Aug 16, 2012
171
12
81
With the 3960x,3970x,3990x, why would any idiot want those anyway ?
If your software stack is fully open source then you would be right. Scientific image processing of microscopy data is a clear example of vertical markets where that is not the case, several standard tools are closed source programs which rely on Intel's math libraries and/or ICC (e.g. Matlab, Amira, Imaris) and typically perform much worse on AMD thanks to various cripple functions inserted by Intel.
Given the tiny market (and the disinterest of most of the imaging community regarding computer hardware), Iit is really hard to come across relevant software benchmarks, but in the case of Matlab Intel outperforms AMD by more than a 2x margin unless you switch to AMD officially unsupported math libraries.

Threadripper also offer less support for workstation class hardware by lacking support for server memory modules, I spent a good deal of time to find a trx4 mobo that would officially support 128gb of ecc udimm in 8 slots and it was an Asrock RGB gaming model. Last I checked, finding 128gb ecc ram for a xeon 22xx is much easier and 4x32gb buffered dimms are the same cost of 8x16 udimms leaving you with free ram slots.

If you are spending grant money and that machine MUST work reliably for 5-8 years, would you buy an Asrock mobo with RGB or a Supermicro/equivalent workstation class mobo?

I could have bought an Epyc, but with a 3ghz turbo speed it would work poorly for several image filters and algorithms which are not parallel. I really wanted to buy AMD but the support for my market was not there.
 
  • Like
Reactions: amrnuke

amrnuke

Senior member
Apr 24, 2019
844
1,027
96
If your software stack is fully open source then you would be right. Scientific image processing of microscopy data is a clear example of vertical markets where that is not the case, several standard tools are closed source programs which rely on Intel's math libraries and/or ICC (e.g. Matlab, Amira, Imaris) and typically perform much worse on AMD thanks to various cripple functions inserted by Intel.
Given the tiny market (and the disinterest of most of the imaging community regarding computer hardware), Iit is really hard to come across relevant software benchmarks, but in the case of Matlab Intel outperforms AMD by more than a 2x margin unless you switch to AMD officially unsupported math libraries.

Threadripper also offer less support for workstation class hardware by lacking support for server memory modules, I spent a good deal of time to find a trx4 mobo that would officially support 128gb of ecc udimm in 8 slots and it was an Asrock RGB gaming model. Last I checked, finding 128gb ecc ram for a xeon 22xx is much easier and 4x32gb buffered dimms are the same cost of 8x16 udimms leaving you with free ram slots.

If you are spending grant money and that machine MUST work reliably for 5-8 years, would you buy an Asrock mobo with RGB or a Supermicro/equivalent workstation class mobo?

I could have bought an Epyc, but with a 3ghz turbo speed it would work poorly for several image filters and algorithms which are not parallel. I really wanted to buy AMD but the support for my market was not there.
Exactly. As I've said many times before with respect to AMD and Intel HEDT and server offerings... it depends on your workload. A 3990X doesn't matter if you're running one of the workloads where Intel has a 40%+ lead.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY