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Discussion Ryzen 3000 series benchmark thread ** Open **

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amrnuke

Senior member
Apr 24, 2019
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An overclocked 8700k is at least 10% faster in clockspeed than the best possible clockspeed for ryzen (if it can actually reach the advertised clocks). The only way to make up for that is either more cores or better IPC. My only demanding use is gaming, where more that 6 cores is of little if any benefit. So the difference must be made up by IPC. Are you trying to say Ryzen is 10% faster per clock in gaming?? Would it really hurt you that much to admit there are other options than Ryzen depending on use case??

Granted this is off topic in this thread, so I will not comment further.
At pure 720p, 8700K pulls 7% higher FPS, according to TechPowerUp's average. At more realistic gaming resolutions, of course, the gap is narrower - 4% at 1080p and 2% at 1440p via TPU and TechSpot and pretty close (appears on average within 2%) on Anandtech's review. So it would appear that since the boost clock deficit is ~7% and the more CPU-intensive 720p deficit is ~7%, IPC is probably as close to on-par in gaming as could be reasonable deduced from benchmarks. (Granted, the 8700K does it with 40-50% more package power draw under load.)

I think this would be an interesting area of conversation for sure! Not sure why the need to stop commenting, unless discussion of the benchmark results is prohibited.
 
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thesmokingman

Platinum Member
May 6, 2010
2,139
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For those with golden chips, try the new agesa out. Per CCD/CCX overclocking in bios is available. I've been testing it the last few hours and its definitely wirth a shot. The benefit is you can stop throwing mass volts to overcome a weak CCX.
 

DarthKyrie

Golden Member
Jul 11, 2016
1,221
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For those with golden chips, try the new agesa out. Per CCD/CCX overclocking in bios is available. I've been testing it the last few hours and its definitely wirth a shot. The benefit is you can stop throwing mass volts to overcome a weak CCX.
Nice to see AMD allow the release of these BIOS before November 1st, I didn't think they were releasing til November.
 
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VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
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That OzTalksHW YT vid about the 3500X versus i5-9400F was pretty instructive, but I kind of figured that it would turn out that way. I find it unfathomable that they're not (currently?) releasing it here in the States, but maybe they feel that they can use it to grow mind / market-share in China, and in the long term, that's a larger market than the US. Just be aware that in some cases, they're going to get under-cut on pricing between the i5-9400F and the Ryzen R5 3600.

Although, as @GunsMadeAmericaFree let me know in another thread, the Ryzen R5 3600 is $175.75 on ebay right now from Newegg after a coupon. Pretty sweet.
 

Hans Gruber

Senior member
Dec 23, 2006
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Nice to see AMD allow the release of these BIOS before November 1st, I didn't think they were releasing til November.
What qualifies as massive voltages? I have a 3600 that runs @ 4.2hz 24x7. It's very stable @ 1.36v reported in CPU-Z 1.365 in bios. Stock 3600's vcore is always 1.4v and the clocks dance around but never hit 4.2ghz I think that is the reason why people say the Zen 2 chips run hot. AMD throws a high voltage at the chips for stability. I have a 240mm AIO.
 

Hans Gruber

Senior member
Dec 23, 2006
701
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That OzTalksHW YT vid about the 3500X versus i5-9400F was pretty instructive, but I kind of figured that it would turn out that way. I find it unfathomable that they're not (currently?) releasing it here in the States, but maybe they feel that they can use it to grow mind / market-share in China, and in the long term, that's a larger market than the US. Just be aware that in some cases, they're going to get under-cut on pricing between the i5-9400F and the Ryzen R5 3600.

Although, as @GunsMadeAmericaFree let me know in another thread, the Ryzen R5 3600 is $175.75 on ebay right now from Newegg after a coupon. Pretty sweet.
Virtual Larry, that is the price I got my 3600 for on Ebay via Newegg $175. I took the liberty of taking advantage of the 8% in Ebay bucks which added an additional $14-15 off that price last week.
 

VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
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Virtual Larry, that is the price I got my 3600 for on Ebay via Newegg $175. I took the liberty of taking advantage of the 8% in Ebay bucks which added an additional $14-15 off that price last week.
You know, we do have a Hot Deals forum here. That deal would definitely qualify. If you're paranoid, post it after you've already put in your order.
 
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DarthKyrie

Golden Member
Jul 11, 2016
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What qualifies as massive voltages? I have a 3600 that runs @ 4.2hz 24x7. It's very stable @ 1.36v reported in CPU-Z 1.365 in bios. Stock 3600's vcore is always 1.4v and the clocks dance around but never hit 4.2ghz I think that is the reason why people say the Zen 2 chips run hot. AMD throws a high voltage at the chips for stability. I have a 240mm AIO.
AMD has been well known for jacking up the voltages so that more silicon is viable. You can always try under-volting your chip to see what you can get it stable at. @DrMrLordX would be able to help you out more than I can, I don't own Ryzen yet.
 

Hans Gruber

Senior member
Dec 23, 2006
701
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AMD has been well known for jacking up the voltages so that more silicon is viable. You can always try under-volting your chip to see what you can get it stable at. @DrMrLordX would be able to help you out more than I can, I don't own Ryzen yet.
I already talked with LordX about offset voltages in another thread. I am happy with my 3600. I have the voltage dialed in @ 1.36v 4200mhz. I removed the boost so it's always 4200mhz. Using standard out of the box settings has the vcore at 1.4v pretty much all the time on CPU-Z when the CPU is 4ghz or higher. It never touches 4.2ghz running standard. I think you are right about the voltages but also a cushion for CPU's making sure they are stable and never crash. I think having water cooling is the way to go with Zen 2 chips. The Noctua people will use their big air coolers. So I would say at least 120mm air coolers are a minimum.

Eventually I will tinker with offset voltages. I am breaking in this CPU and the AR5 paste. It's only been up for 3 or 4 days.
 

DarthKyrie

Golden Member
Jul 11, 2016
1,221
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I already talked with LordX about offset voltages in another thread. I am happy with my 3600. I have the voltage dialed in @ 1.36v 4200mhz. I removed the boost so it's always 4200mhz. Using standard out of the box settings has the vcore at 1.4v pretty much all the time on CPU-Z when the CPU is 4ghz or higher. It never touches 4.2ghz running standard. I think you are right about the voltages but also a cushion for CPU's making sure they are stable and never crash. I think having water cooling is the way to go with Zen 2 chips. The Noctua people will use their big air coolers. So I would say at least 120mm air coolers are a minimum.

Eventually I will tinker with offset voltages. I am breaking in this CPU and the AR5 paste. It's only been up for 3 or 4 days.
I forgot he was talking to you about it in that thread, I had just remembered reading it and figured I would mention it. I would say go with at least a 180mm if you go AIO.
 

thesmokingman

Platinum Member
May 6, 2010
2,139
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AMD has been well known for jacking up the voltages so that more silicon is viable. You can always try under-volting your chip to see what you can get it stable at. @DrMrLordX would be able to help you out more than I can, I don't own Ryzen yet.
Are you referring to the voltages at idle? That voltage w/o amperage doesn't do anything. These aren't Intel chips, just saying. That said I got one CCX up to 4.5ghz and another to 4.4ghz, and the other two are at 4.35ghz with voltage at roughly 1.32v. That's not a lot of voltage.
 

Hans Gruber

Senior member
Dec 23, 2006
701
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Are you referring to the voltages at idle? That voltage w/o amperage doesn't do anything. These aren't Intel chips, just saying. That said I got one CCX up to 4.5ghz and another to 4.4ghz, and the other two are at 4.35ghz with voltage at roughly 1.32v. That's not a lot of voltage.
I am referring to stock 3600 settings. If you reset your bios to defaults and watch the AMD stock 3.6 to whatever it boosts to. On mine it barely hit 4.1ghz, usually 4ghz. The vcore is not static and bounces around from high 1.3's to never below 1.4v when playing a game like BF5. I was watching the vcore in CPU-Z and core temp while gaming. I think that is why people say the Zen 2 chips run hot. They don't know why but as one forum member pointed out. AMD delivers CPU's with a high default vcore to cover all the good and bad silicon.

I booted 4.3ghz with no issues 1.37v. There were errors running a benchmark but no app crashes and no blue screens.
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
14,032
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What qualifies as massive voltages?
Depends on current draw. An AVX2-heavy app that pulls massive current can get dangerous at voltages above ~1.32v, while low-current ST workloads can be safe at voltages of 1.45v and higher. It's relative, and it can make static OCs somewhat frustrating depending on what you're doing.
 

thesmokingman

Platinum Member
May 6, 2010
2,139
67
91
I am referring to stock 3600 settings. If you reset your bios to defaults and watch the AMD stock 3.6 to whatever it boosts to. On mine it barely hit 4.1ghz, usually 4ghz. The vcore is not static and bounces around from high 1.3's to never below 1.4v when playing a game like BF5. I was watching the vcore in CPU-Z and core temp while gaming. I think that is why people say the Zen 2 chips run hot. They don't know why but as one forum member pointed out. AMD delivers CPU's with a high default vcore to cover all the good and bad silicon.

I booted 4.3ghz with no issues 1.37v. There were errors running a benchmark but no app crashes and no blue screens.
There is a difference between the voltage you set and what is stock. The stock voltage will never hurt the cpu and also the 1.4v+ is misunderstoof. When a load is applied the voltage will immediately scale to the load. Okay, the idea that AMD feeds a ton of voltage is an assumption, not fact. And it has more to do with a misunderstanding of how they use the voltage. The post above covers voltage well too. Hell if ya really wanted to know, AMD has explained this before. Another thing it seems you and the assuming poster is missing is that the voltages are not random. The higher 1.4v+ is single core obviously and w/o a monitoring app that shows individual voltage, you will only see the highest voltage. The other obvious thing that you guys are ignoring is that Zen TDP is ridiculously LOW. How does one correlate "jacking up voltage" with lowest TDP per core ever?

Zen runs hot? Hmm, like Intel's are not obscenely hot in comparison? C'mon now... to say that and ignore the fission reactor in a 9900K? Zen and any chip that is on tiny nodes will be harder to cool because the chips are so dense small. However Zen is easy to cool comparatively because of the chiplets and its soldered properly. It does require good cooling no doubt but it is not hard to cool.
 

DarthKyrie

Golden Member
Jul 11, 2016
1,221
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I am referring to stock 3600 settings. If you reset your bios to defaults and watch the AMD stock 3.6 to whatever it boosts to. On mine it barely hit 4.1ghz, usually 4ghz. The vcore is not static and bounces around from high 1.3's to never below 1.4v when playing a game like BF5. I was watching the vcore in CPU-Z and core temp while gaming. I think that is why people say the Zen 2 chips run hot. They don't know why but as one forum member pointed out. AMD delivers CPU's with a high default vcore to cover all the good and bad silicon.

I booted 4.3ghz with no issues 1.37v. There were errors running a benchmark but no app crashes and no blue screens.
AMD puts the voltage to CPUs and GPUs they don't discriminate when it comes to volts and their silicon.

Are you referring to the voltages at idle? That voltage w/o amperage doesn't do anything. These aren't Intel chips, just saying. That said I got one CCX up to 4.5ghz and another to 4.4ghz, and the other two are at 4.35ghz with voltage at roughly 1.32v. That's not a lot of voltage.
I know that AMD isn't Intel, I try to remind people of that fact almost daily. What I was referring to is the fact that AMD puts the volts to all of their products to make sure that they can use as much silicon possible from a wafer. You got yourself a nice CPU BTW, not as good as Mark's 3900x that he has at 4.1 GHz on 1.1v .
 

thesmokingman

Platinum Member
May 6, 2010
2,139
67
91
AMD puts the voltage to CPUs and GPUs they don't discriminate when it comes to volts and their silicon.



I know that AMD isn't Intel, I try to remind people of that fact almost daily. What I was referring to is the fact that AMD puts the volts to all of their products to make sure that they can use as much silicon possible from a wafer. You got yourself a nice CPU BTW, not as good as Mark's 3900x that he has at 4.1 GHz on 1.1v .
You really need to stop making your assumptions come across as fact.

And no, I DO NOT have a great chip, it's only average. And I'm not pulling that out of my ass.
 

DarthKyrie

Golden Member
Jul 11, 2016
1,221
828
116
There is a difference between the voltage you set and what is stock. The stock voltage will never hurt the cpu and also the 1.4v+ is misunderstoof. When a load is applied the voltage will immediately scale to the load. Okay, the idea that AMD feeds a ton of voltage is an assumption, not fact. And it has more to do with a misunderstanding of how they use the voltage. The post above covers voltage well too. Hell if ya really wanted to know, AMD has explained this before. Another thing it seems you and the assuming poster is missing is that the voltages are not random. The higher 1.4v+ is single core obviously and w/o a monitoring app that shows individual voltage, you will only see the highest voltage. The other obvious thing that you guys are ignoring is that Zen TDP is ridiculously LOW. How does one correlate "jacking up voltage" with lowest TDP per core ever?

Zen runs hot? Hmm, like Intel's are not obscenely hot in comparison? C'mon now... to say that and ignore the fission reactor in a 9900K? Zen and any chip that is on tiny nodes will be harder to cool because the chips are so dense small. However Zen is easy to cool comparatively because of the chiplets and its soldered properly. It does require good cooling no doubt but it is not hard to cool.
I think Hans is referring to the hotspots that the Ryzen 3000s have which we will end up seeing more of as we shrink smaller and smaller.
 

DarthKyrie

Golden Member
Jul 11, 2016
1,221
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You really need to stop making your assumptions come across as fact.

And no, I DO NOT have a great chip, it's only average. And I'm not pulling that out of my ass.
What assumptions am I making here? I hope you aren't referring to the voltage part because that really is a thing, it's why people have been undervolting AMD products to make them run better for as long as I can remember.

I said you have a nice CPU not a great CPU, this was the reason why I mentioned Mark's 3900x.
 

Hans Gruber

Senior member
Dec 23, 2006
701
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I want to point out I really like the 3600. I realized going in that the 3600 is the bottom of the high end Ryzen chips. The highest priced chips with more cores get the best silicon. The server chips get the very best silicon. AMD includes the very nicest crap coolers with their CPU's. You need either 120mm air cooler or water cooling. Based on the physics of the transistors. A 240mm AIO watercooler is not going to be overpowered by heat dissipation of a 3600 before the limits of the silicon and transistors fail to achieve a higher CPU core clock. I forget the term I am looking for. Those physics experts know the term that escapes me.

Look at the Vega 64. People undervolt them because AMD has good silicon and bad silicon and they have high voltages on the Vega 64 to overpower the defects in the bad silicon. They don't want their GPU's to crash so they throw a lot of voltage at it. Power consumption is not a concern for me. I want the very lowest direct voltage at the very highest CPU core clock without crashing. I don't like the boost clock method because it's for laptops. Desktop PC people are power users not energy conservationists.

When I watch CPU-Z and see vcore @ 1.4v and higher with clocks bounching around all close to 200mhz below the max boost clock speed of 4.2ghz. My benchmarks on many different benchmark apps do not lie. My method yields much better results than using the stock settings of the 3600.

Seeing peak temps close to 70C on water be it for an instant doesn't bother me at all. My CPU idles at under 40C and remains for web browsing around 40C. During gaming sessions the CPU is between 55C-60C all the time.

The reason the temps are hotter isn't just vcore but the density of the processor being in a much smaller space. Heat it heat and there is probably more heat generated in a 7nm chip than a 12nm chip because there is more CPU real estate working than on a 12nm chip. Transistor density is much higher on 7nm than larger CPU's.

I imagine the new AMD AGESA 1.0.0.4 will yield even better performance than the current AGESA microcode. I want to point out that I have seen benchmarks of 4.45ghz and 4.4ghz for 3600 processors. I think maybe those new numbers are using the 1.0.0.4 microcode. I have to wait until next month for MSI to release the new version of AGESA.
 

VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
46,218
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There's another 10% Ebay Bucks deal (active now) on ebay, and AFAIK Newegg is still selling their 3600 and 3600X with the discount promo code. Good deal, I wish that I had some money to get a couple more.
 
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DisEnchantment

Senior member
Mar 3, 2017
301
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Ryzen 9 3900X/Samsung 970 Evo 1TB NVMe SSD, 32GB RAM 3200 MT/s Kernel 5.3.1 compilation.
595 seconds, including signing, deb package creation and kernel source untar.
Attached htop output. Those sweet 24 threads working hard to make me money.


Screenshot from 2019-10-29 17-05-32.png
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
7,178
862
126

Review of a 3700H/1660 Ti Max-Q laptop. What's notable about it is that they managed to get Optimus working on an AMD CPU laptop, I don't think I've seen that before.
 

Hans Gruber

Senior member
Dec 23, 2006
701
163
116
I would like to apologize to the forum for my pathetic Samsung 850 EVO benchmark scores in one of my previous posts. I have remedied the situation. I have brought great shame to the Samsung name by posting those pathetic scores. It was an SATA driver issue. Also I see that many have been taking advantage of the new AGESA 1.0.0.4 microcode for their 3600 CPU's. Posting better scores than me, which is good. I am very happy with the 3600. Here are my updated benchmarks.
https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/21326249

I have to wait a few more week before 1.0.0.4 is available for my motherboard.

My next step is a NVMe drive. Probably a 1TB Adada XPG SX8200pro.
 

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