Right to Repair

KMFJD

Lifer
Aug 11, 2005
29,395
42,940
136

Apple wanted $1200 to fix laptop display , takje it to a shop and it's just a bent pin and fixes it for free in 2 seconds. Looks like there's a few states that are starting to put right to repair in the law books and will be forcing companies like Apple to sell spare parts/repair manuals. Sleazy apple at it again.
 

punkncat

Junior Member
Oct 10, 2018
17
1
6
This same thing could be applied to a whole lot of consumer products.

A while back I think there was some thing where they either were looking to, or did pass some manner of law/resolution about the warranty void if removed stickers.
Unfortunate for consumers, in general, products have been made hard or impossible to fix, if parts are even available to do so. Most things are made to be purchased the way they are, used, and thrown out. TBH Apple has been doing that for a while. You may recall having one of their early model Core 2 laptops that were suddenly made into paperweights....

I am not a fan even for the need of more regulation, but something like this would be good to see.
 
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Viper1j

Diamond Member
Jul 31, 2018
4,171
3,653
136
This same thing could be applied to a whole lot of consumer products.

A while back I think there was some thing where they either were looking to, or did pass some manner of law/resolution about the warranty void if removed stickers.
Unfortunate for consumers, in general, products have been made hard or impossible to fix, if parts are even available to do so. Most things are made to be purchased the way they are, used, and thrown out. TBH Apple has been doing that for a while. You may recall having one of their early model Core 2 laptops that were suddenly made into paperweights....

I am not a fan even for the need of more regulation, but something like this would be good to see.

It all started when they made it a federal felony to take the tag from your mattress.
 
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1prophet

Diamond Member
Aug 17, 2005
5,313
534
126
This same thing could be applied to a whole lot of consumer products.

A while back I think there was some thing where they either were looking to, or did pass some manner of law/resolution about the warranty void if removed stickers.
Unfortunate for consumers, in general, products have been made hard or impossible to fix, if parts are even available to do so. Most things are made to be purchased the way they are, used, and thrown out. TBH Apple has been doing that for a while. You may recall having one of their early model Core 2 laptops that were suddenly made into paperweights....

I am not a fan even for the need of more regulation, but something like this would be good to see.


Apple and the rest of the "planned obsolescence" corpocrats would have a heart attack and sic their lawyers if this type of repair service was allowed in the US.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=jcLrQbJXyFY

And for those that think planned obsolescence is a myth, think again.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKLip7Q_Y0s

 
Feb 4, 2009
34,630
15,824
136
I don’t get it the broken screen is already out of warranty, why be afraid to break the void if removed sticker?
 

Zorba

Lifer
Oct 22, 1999
14,649
10,058
136
I think in the interest of reducing waste and pollution, plus protecting consumers. Companies should have to provide spares for at least 5 years. And all electronics should have to have replaceable batteries. It is fucking stupid that a $800 phone is trash after two years because the battery is shot. Then multiply that by a few hundred million phones in the US, what a waste.
 

KMFJD

Lifer
Aug 11, 2005
29,395
42,940
136

Zaap

Diamond Member
Jun 12, 2008
7,162
424
126
I think in the interest of reducing waste and pollution, plus protecting consumers. Companies should have to provide spares for at least 5 years. And all electronics should have to have replaceable batteries. It is fucking stupid that a $800 phone is trash after two years because the battery is shot. Then multiply that by a few hundred million phones in the US, what a waste.
Well said. Exactly. Kind of amazes me people claim to care about the enviornment but allow -ne encourage- these giant companies to get away with making quick-turn-around garbage commodities out of all these electronic devices.

The trend of removing all ability to repair/upgrade/part swap electronic devices is horrible for consumers and an environmental disaster on top of it.
 

punkncat

Junior Member
Oct 10, 2018
17
1
6
And for those that think planned obsolescence is a myth, think again.

From another POV and to be fair.

If part of the product you are offering is prestige, so to speak, you really can't allow the product to stay operable forever and maintain the 'mark' of the status you are buying with the product. In addition to a million other factors when considering keeping support and whatnot available for a long line of products, you can also count on consumers getting a very streamlined experience across those products, even in spite of the regard for the "upgrades" between the few models you continue to support.

Phones make a fine example of that expectation. For the most part, once the phone passes around a 4 year mark and according to the quality level it was when you got it, getting a new one at that point is a whole new experience in terms of performance and speed. They start acting funny, they may or may not take (security) updates or new OS forms.
In many cases you are paying for "the experience" rather than "the ability".
 
Last edited:

Thebobo

Lifer
Jun 19, 2006
18,592
7,673
136
Well said. Exactly. Kind of amazes me people claim to care about the enviornment but allow -ne encourage- these giant companies to get away with making quick-turn-around garbage commodities out of all these electronic devices.

The trend of removing all ability to repair/upgrade/part swap electronic devices is horrible for consumers and an environmental disaster on top of it.

That would require regulation which will be hard to push in the current climate. But I could be wrong.
 
Nov 8, 2012
20,828
4,777
146

Apple wanted $1200 to fix laptop display , takje it to a shop and it's just a bent pin and fixes it for free in 2 seconds. Looks like there's a few states that are starting to put right to repair in the law books and will be forcing companies like Apple to sell spare parts/repair manuals. Sleazy apple at it again.

One problem, however, is that companies are starting to make the products incredibly... irreparable (if that's a word). Where-in all the items are so closely soldered/glued that if you attempt to take things apart they have a very very high probability to damage things worse.

I've heard that is the case for the latest types of cell-phones when people attempt to repair the screens if they get a crack.

Either way I'm all for this type of law.
 

FIVR

Diamond Member
Jun 1, 2016
3,753
911
106
You don't have the "right" to repair shit. Show me in the constitution where it says Joe Hotdog gets to repair literally anything he owns? Does he get the right to repair his helicopter without any help or certifications? How about his private G5 jet? You can try to repair anything you own, but if you F it up... or can't figure it out... that's your fvcking problem. The reason Apple doesn't want you trying, is because the average degenerate trying to repair their apple device has the hand-eye coordination of a chimpanzee. Most of your are just plain too stupid to fix a device as intricately manufactured as an iPhone or Macbook.

Apple wants to have completely waterproof, air-gapped devices and your monkey hands and degenerate brains can't understand why they won't give you SD card slots and headphone jacks and phillips head screws. Shut the fvck up and leave AAPL alone!
 
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Nov 8, 2012
20,828
4,777
146
You don't have the "right" to repair shit. Show me in the constitution where it says Joe Hotdog gets to repair literally anything he owns? Does he get the right to repair his helicopter without any help or certifications? How about his private G5 jet? You can try to repair anything you own, but if you F it up... or can't figure it out... that's your fvcking problem. The reason Apple doesn't want you trying, is because the average degenerate trying to repair their apple device has the hand-eye coordination of a chimpanzee. Most of your are just plain too stupid to fix a device as intricately manufactured as an iPhone or Macbook.

Apple wants to have completely waterproof, air-gapped devices and your monkey hands and degenerate brains can't understand why they won't give you SD card slots and headphone jacks and phillips head screws. Shut the fvck up and leave AAPL alone!

Bullshit. The reason they don't want you to repair it is why make money on selling the product when you can make money on selling the product AND repairing the product over and over? Win win win.

Get your AAPL stock owning ass out of here ;)
 

FIVR

Diamond Member
Jun 1, 2016
3,753
911
106
Bullshit. The reason they don't want you to repair it is why make money on selling the product when you can make money on selling the product AND repairing the product over and over? Win win win.

Get your AAPL stock owning ass out of here ;)

Stay away from my calls you damn dirty ape ;)
 

Josephus312

Senior member
Aug 10, 2018
586
172
71
This same thing could be applied to a whole lot of consumer products.

A while back I think there was some thing where they either were looking to, or did pass some manner of law/resolution about the warranty void if removed stickers.
Unfortunate for consumers, in general, products have been made hard or impossible to fix, if parts are even available to do so. Most things are made to be purchased the way they are, used, and thrown out. TBH Apple has been doing that for a while. You may recall having one of their early model Core 2 laptops that were suddenly made into paperweights....

I am not a fan even for the need of more regulation, but something like this would be good to see.

You have your first like with that post. I fully agree.
 

FIVR

Diamond Member
Jun 1, 2016
3,753
911
106
Please stop

apple-meme.jpg
 
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hal2kilo

Lifer
Feb 24, 2009
23,524
10,400
136
It's obvious that not just Apple is in on the Oh your non-replaceable battery died? Sorry, time for a new whatchamacallit. Of course they argue that it's to make the products lighter and streamlined. I think it sucks.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
84,254
48,458
136
One problem, however, is that companies are starting to make the products incredibly... irreparable (if that's a word). Where-in all the items are so closely soldered/glued that if you attempt to take things apart they have a very very high probability to damage things worse.

I've heard that is the case for the latest types of cell-phones when people attempt to repair the screens if they get a crack.

Either way I'm all for this type of law.

This is a very big problem. As someone who used to work at an electronics repair depot even in big systems the soldering skill needed to reach some hard parts is really high. I know I could never do it and I have thousands of hours of repair and soldering experience.

I agree with requirements to make parts available though.
 

Josephus312

Senior member
Aug 10, 2018
586
172
71
This is a very big problem. As someone who used to work at an electronics repair depot even in big systems the soldering skill needed to reach some hard parts is really high. I know I could never do it and I have thousands of hours of repair and soldering experience.

I agree with requirements to make parts available though.

Resoldering parts is a lot easier than actually soldering them in the first time. You basically just need to heat the connections enough to remove the old part apply new part and heat it again.

In many cases you can do it on the opposite of the board using a pair of pliers, a piece of aluminum and a soldering iron.

I've been doing it that way for a long time.
 

Indus

Lifer
May 11, 2002
10,141
6,747
136
I just recently replaced my 8 year old laptop. It kept overheating and rebooting no matter what I did even if it was just look at cnn. Wish I could repair it but it was time. :(

At least this time I got a fanless passively cooled one.. so it won't be dirt and lint and gunk causing it to overheat.
 

Josephus312

Senior member
Aug 10, 2018
586
172
71
I just recently replaced my 8 year old laptop. It kept overheating and rebooting no matter what I did even if it was just look at cnn. Wish I could repair it but it was time. :(

At least this time I got a fanless passively cooled one.. so it won't be dirt and lint and gunk causing it to overheat.

Most of the time it's not dirt, lint and gunk but rather a bad connection. I've seen this on a number of laptops and pads where the only thing needed was a bit of heat and some flux.
 

Vic

Elite Member
Jun 12, 2001
50,415
14,307
136
It all started when they made it a federal felony to take the tag from your mattress.
It's not a felony for the consumer to remove the tag from their mattress.

As for the OP, I don't buy Apple. Ever.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
84,254
48,458
136
Resoldering parts is a lot easier than actually soldering them in the first time. You basically just need to heat the connections enough to remove the old part apply new part and heat it again.

In many cases you can do it on the opposite of the board using a pair of pliers, a piece of aluminum and a soldering iron.

I've been doing it that way for a long time.

I mean I know how to solder but when you get into the number of pins on a modern IC and the small area your average joe is far more likely to make things worse than make them better.