P&Ns middle name is and

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cytg111

Lifer
Mar 17, 2008
20,889
10,606
136
They're getting a fuckload (metric, imperial, whatever) of basically free oil right now, so they'll lose that sweet black milk. Probably some very lucrative future investments too. It pays to help the loser out, if only so you can pick at the corpse later.
I am just thinking they'd be able to engineer that too with a broken up Russia? Maybe? Plus they share a lot of border, there might be land to be gained as well.
 

kage69

Lifer
Jul 17, 2003
24,050
26,682
136
Would China even stand to lose if it helped the west choke Russia off?
Yes. China needs the cheap energy, it's tied to Russia as much as Russia is to them. Look how they back eachother in the UNSC. Look at naval cooperation over Taiwan. Just flipping over to the West's point of view isn't really feasible. They're already able to tell Putin 'hands off Kazakhstan' and get their way. With China it's all about Taiwan. It's a national face thing and a gateway to Pacific hegemony. Having a credible Russian military to back them up in a possible invasion outweighs the grief they get supporting the Kremlin over Ukraine. A choked, fragmented Russia makes a Taiwan conquest more difficult should it come to war.
 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
60,686
8,779
136
Growing up in the 60's a Sino/Soviet war was always a possibility. (there was a short conflict, neither side won...but BOTH sides claimed victory)
 
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Pens1566

Diamond Member
Oct 11, 2005
9,995
5,139
136
I was just reading about that and thought to myself...really? Only between 60 to 365 days off a sentence...for an organ or bone marrow? Talk about lowballing the inmates, but I'm not surprised.
Bone marrow wouldn't be that big of a deal ... at least nowhere near a kidney or part of your liver.
 

Pohemi

Diamond Member
Oct 2, 2004
6,592
5,926
146
Bone marrow wouldn't be that big of a deal ... at least nowhere near a kidney or part of your liver.
I wasn't only thinking about the anatomical cost to the inmate, but the value to the recipient. It's something that is pretty much always in scarce supply, and they want to offer the donors a few months off.

I wonder why long-serving inmates would bother to be honest, other than the moral and empathetic standpoint to do good for someone else and maybe save a life.
 

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