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nVidia 3090 reviews thread

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Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
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I am actually glad I could not get one (in retrospect). Between the super high cost, and the small performance difference, and the hardware failures....

Now I want to wait and see what AMD does and see if Nvidia comes out with a 20 gig 3080.
 

Mopetar

Diamond Member
Jan 31, 2011
5,049
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As opposed to your made up guesses about the state of the market.
I haven't made any claims. I've just pointed out that the data you're using doesn't support your conclusions or that your analysis of it is faulty or incomplete. If you want to claim that the market for high-end GPUs has decreased or remained flat you need to provide some actual evidence of that. Total GPU sales is not a good measure for the simple reason that I pointed out: integrated CPU graphics have completely eliminated an entire segment of the GPU market.

You can even see this just by looking at product lineups now as opposed to the past. Go back a decade and you can see NVidia selling x20, x10, and x05 cards that were inexpensive cards meant for little more than driving a display so that OEMs could make something for the lower end of the market. Those cards just aren't getting made any more because an Intel or AMD APU is good enough for those computers and what they get used for. The split 20xx / 16xx naming scheme with Turing muddies the water a little bit, but if we go off of pricing and die sizes it doesn't seem as though NVidia is making anything below what would traditionally be an x50 or x40 card in the desktop market any more.

According to Newegg, the volume at the store for that single niche product, exceeded Black Friday volume.

There is nothing that could have anticipated that. It's just insane.
Even if it weren't to those levels which are quite insane, you'd be hard pressed to argue that NVidia who would have known not only the exact performance of their card but also all of their historical data for customer purchasing habits couldn't have even remotely anticipated what the demand was going to be like, particularly for the price they set. Companies worth over 300 billion dollars aren't that stupid.

If a single product is exceeding all of the usual Black Friday volume either there's a horrible issue with bots or it's not as niche of a product as you thought it was. Compared to their usual standards, it's hard to say that this has been a good launch for NVidia.[/quote][/QUOTE]
 

guidryp

Senior member
Apr 3, 2006
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I haven't made any claims.
You claimed that the historical sales numbers weren't relevant, because the market has grown for NVidia GPUs.

That is a claim that the market is larger now that it was historically.

Despite the actual market for GPUs being on a long term decline.


If a single product is exceeding all of the usual Black Friday volume either there's a horrible issue with bots or it's not as niche of a product as you thought it was. Compared to their usual standards, it's hard to say that this has been a good launch for NVidia.
There is no way that the actual demand for a single GPU model, should be anywhere near to demand for all black Friday products combined. That is just bonkers.
 

MrTeal

Platinum Member
Dec 7, 2003
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You claimed that the historical sales numbers weren't relevant, because the market has grown for NVidia GPUs.

That is a claim that the market is larger now that it was historically.

Despite the actual market for GPUs being on a long term decline.




There is no way that the actual demand for a single GPU model, should be anywhere near to demand for all black Friday products combined. That is just bonkers.
Do you have a link to the claim that Newegg had more demand for 30 series GPUs than every product on Black Friday combined?
 

cmdrdredd

Lifer
Dec 12, 2001
26,707
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There is no way that the actual demand for a single GPU model, should be anywhere near to demand for all black Friday products combined. That is just bonkers.
It's the bot traffic trying to resell for absurd pricing. I've seen listings for stupidly high numbers I'm ashamed to even post lol
 

guidryp

Senior member
Apr 3, 2006
590
465
136
It's the bot traffic trying to resell for absurd pricing. I've seen listings for stupidly high numbers I'm ashamed to even post lol
I agree. It's not real demand. We have no way of know what the real demand is. Bots are being sold as a money making service, so there will be significant work put into foiling bot countermeasures, so there will be no easy fix for these issues.

If only people would just calm down and wait for retailer stock and ignore the scalpers.
 

Mopetar

Diamond Member
Jan 31, 2011
5,049
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You claimed that the historical sales numbers weren't relevant, because the market has grown for NVidia GPUs.

That is a claim that the market is larger now that it was historically.

Despite the actual market for GPUs being on a long term decline.
Read what I wrote. Actually read it and think about it, because in your hurry to defend your own arguments you're engaging in a lot of additional fallacious reasoning.

I specifically stated that you can't use overall market data for all GPUs to make some kind of claim about the market for a specific category (i.e., high-end flagship products) because those two things aren't the same. It's like trying to claim anything about the yearly wheat production in Kansas by posting statistics about worldwide production. In this example it's entirely possible for the production in Kansas to have trended in the opposite direction of the overall global figures.

I can't conclusively say one way or another how the market for high-end GPUs has changed over the last decade. I haven't researched it and I really don't care since it doesn't affect me one way or another. However, refuting bad evidence does not constitute a claim to the contrary. Pointing out that your use of global sales data is improper and that it makes your argument is flawed doesn't constitute a claim on my part that the opposite of what you stated must be true. To use the prior analogy, pointing out that applying global wheat production statistics to an argument about what production in Kansas is flawed reason doesn't mean I have a position on the what production in Kansas one way or another.

Also, for what feels like the thirteenth thousand time, the onus to support a claim is on the person who makes it. It was your assertion that the market for high-end GPUs had not grown. I simply pointed out that your evidence for that was not good support of the claim. It is not my responsibility to post evidence to show that you are wrong or that the opposite of what you've claimed is actually true. It's sufficient to show that the evidence for your argument does not support it. You could still very well be correct, but you haven't provided any good evidence that would allow me to believe that claim.
 
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guidryp

Senior member
Apr 3, 2006
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I specifically stated that you can't use overall market data for all GPUs to make some kind of claim about the market for a specific category (i.e., high-end flagship products) because those two things aren't the same. It's like trying to claim anything about the yearly wheat production in Kansas by posting statistics about worldwide production. In this example it's entirely possible for the production in Kansas to have trended in the opposite direction of the overall global figures.
No, you exactly stated, that I couldn't use historical data, because NVidia GPU sales increased here:

The levels may be normal or close to it, but that's just historical data. Whether they actually hit those numbers or not, I think it's fair to say that the demand has increased and grown the size of the market for new NVidia cards.
 

traderjay

Senior member
Sep 24, 2015
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I am actually glad I could not get one (in retrospect). Between the super high cost, and the small performance difference, and the hardware failures....

Now I want to wait and see what AMD does and see if Nvidia comes out with a 20 gig 3080.
Maybe I missed something what type of hardware failure is reported?
 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
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Oh yeah I was a bit worried when I saw that. Are you still getting your 3090? My Strix 3090 is arriving next week!
well, when I can find them, I will decide now that most all the issues are cleared up.
 

n0x1ous

Platinum Member
Sep 9, 2010
2,521
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3090 FE were available for about 2 mins today around 1:30pm central. Finally, my F5ing can end. Anyone else snag one?
 

Mopetar

Diamond Member
Jan 31, 2011
5,049
1,554
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No, you exactly stated, that I couldn't use historical data, because NVidia GPU sales increased here:
I suppose that I could have been more clear, but I had hoped people would be able to infer that I was talking about their high-end cards since those are the only products that have launched so far. I will make sure that I'm explicitly clear on such things in order to avoid any confusion that may result improper inferences.

Also, you can use historical data, but it needs to be the correct type of data. In this particular case, sales of high-end NVidia cards. What you can't do is use historical data that includes all cards sold, because we aren't dealing with all cards and as I and others have pointed out, the historical data includes sales from a segment of the market that no longer exists because both AMD and Intel sell APUs with integrated graphics that do the job that the extreme low-end of the market was meant to cover. As we've seen, trying to use it leads to bad arguments.
 

guidryp

Senior member
Apr 3, 2006
590
465
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Also, you can use historical data, but it needs to be the correct type of data. In this particular case, sales of high-end NVidia cards. What you can't do is use historical data that includes all cards sold, because we aren't dealing with all cards and as I and others have pointed out, the historical data includes sales from a segment of the market that no longer exists because both AMD and Intel sell APUs with integrated graphics that do the job that the extreme low-end of the market was meant to cover. As we've seen, trying to use it leads to bad arguments.
The claims about normal launch numbers were based on higher end cards. IIRC ,RTX 2080/2080Ti card launch, not lower end cards. That was the only historical data when you made your Apple analogy with orders of magnitude differences, to invalidate the historically typical numbers.

This aspect of the thread evolved from partner/retailer info gathered by people like Steve at GN, indicating that this was not a Paper Launch, supplies were about launch normal, just demand was off the charts.

But many it seems can't accept that and instead find a way to blame NVidia. So it's a paper launch, or a conspiracy to raise prices, or some other nonsense.

Anything but what was reported, that demand side was unprecedented. Even the local stand alone Computer Shop I used to deal with all the time, said they faced their largest demand ever.

Steve from GN was even talking to them later and said that even waiting a month wouldn't have changed much.

It's truly unprecedented demand. Not sure why that is so hard to accept.
 

Det0x

Senior member
Sep 11, 2014
404
350
136
Have been benchmarking my strix 3090 in 3dmark benchmark suite, these are the results I'm getting @ 120% powertarget and a 3950x with PBO enabled if anyone are interested :)

PORT ROYAL @
14258 @ https://www.3dmark.com/pr/432587
  • Graphics Score 14258
FIRE STRIKE = 37 435 @ https://www.3dmark.com/fs/23827762
  • Graphics Score 46347
  • Physics Score 34426
  • Combined Score 16 200
FIRE STRIKE EXTREME = 23 868 @ https://www.3dmark.com/fs/23827793
  • Graphics Score 24818
  • Physics Score 34352
  • Combined Score 13681
FIRE STRIKE ULTRA = 13 518 @ https://www.3dmark.com/fs/23827831
  • Graphics Score 13 311
  • Physics Score 34099
  • Combined Score 7559
TIME SPY = 20 573 @ https://www.3dmark.com/spy/14770488
  • Graphics Score 21700
  • CPU Score 15898
TIME SPY EXTREME = 10 875 @ https://www.3dmark.com/spy/14770619
  • Graphics Score 11214
  • CPU Score 9286
WILD LIFE = 101 598 @ https://www.3dmark.com/pr/432587
  • Graphics Score 101598
 
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wr3zzz

Junior Member
Oct 25, 2020
8
0
6
How valid are 3090 reviews between AIB? I just got a MSI Ventus OC 3090 1725Mhz and it GPU Boost by itself to 2025 Mhz and caused power surge in my PSU. I did not overclock and everything was on default. I undervolt to prevent the surge but are still getting 1950 Mhz. I have no idea GPU Boost can result in that big a variance from stock.

Does the difference in GPU Boost reflect in real world performances? If so, given such variance how objective can the reviews be given the variance from GPU Boost cannot be controlled?
 
Last edited:

CP5670

Diamond Member
Jun 24, 2004
4,529
78
91
There is more variation between individual cards than different AIB models. The differences are only in cooling, power limits and power phases. The MSI cards actually have stricter power limits than some of the other models.
 

wr3zzz

Junior Member
Oct 25, 2020
8
0
6
If the GPU Boost variance between individual cards are greater than the difference in AIB models, why do we bother reading AIB reviews? Luck will be the factor in the performance delta you got for your money.
 

Elfear

Diamond Member
May 30, 2004
6,999
517
126
The beast is here! the strix 3090 in my tinyyyyyy case. The card still runs nice and quiet because of good case ventilation! Idles at around 45C (DEGREES) and load temp never exceed 85C.
Tight fit! But that would be awesome if LAN parties were still popular.
 

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