NON_POLITICAL China Coronavirus THREAD

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Zorba

Lifer
Oct 22, 1999
11,667
6,111
136
Never seen or heard of scenes like that. On TV they show compliant calm kids every day now, nobody obstreperous.
12 is different from 5. It also isn't like a screaming fight or anything, she's just trying to prevent a clear opening to her shoulder and keeping her from jerking once the needle is in. She rarely cries after, she's just against the idea of it. Her first COVID test (deep one) also made her much more nervous.

Also news isn't going to show a kid going apeshit when they are doing a story on "Get your kids the shot!"

Eta: "Holding down" is an extreme way of describing it, it's holding her arm or leg still.
 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,209
5,099
126
12 is different from 5. It also isn't like a screaming fight or anything, she's just trying to prevent a clear opening to her shoulder and keeping her from jerking once the needle is in. She rarely cries after, she's just against the idea of it. Her first COVID test (deep one) also made her much more nervous.

Also news isn't going to show a kid going apeshit when they are doing a story on "Get your kids the shot!"
Yes, I fully realize that when watching those. They present the cute ones partly to entice the parents to get onboard. The 27% who declare their intention to get their 5-11 YOs vaxxed now is worrisome. I figure that will go up. I heard a professional say yesterday that getting those millions of kids vaxxed will go a long way toward going from pandemic to endemic status in the USA. Otherwise, it's a much steeper hill we are climbing.

I have yet to be tested for covid. I had my first temperature check for it 5 days ago, the second yesterday. I've been pretty locked down. Since vaxxed I'm way relieved and take chances, sure, but still am masked up with terrific N95's when indoors with strangers (I had from wildfire seasons here before pandemic), and I still social distance, figure that Joe/Jane public is diseased and/or stupid! ;)
 
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balloonshark

Diamond Member
Jun 5, 2008
5,522
1,729
136
I was that way partly because I had no steady job for ages and no health insurance and was young enough nothing ever happened of consequence. I was also living below the "poverty line." When I turned 50 my brother M.D. told me I should start doing prescribed colon cancer exams and had one, and etc. Not too long after, I had jobs where I had coverage but didn't use it. Was laid off one and signed up for COBRA, got checked out and a blood test revealed I had an as yet asymptomatic, but concerning issue. Outpatient surgery took care of it, never got to symptomatic stage but brother assured me it would have were it not for the surgery. Got coverage not long after, regular blood tests, vaccinations, occasional exams, this and that and gradually have developed the attitude that health is primary, not something to be taken for granted. I didn't see a dentist for 2 years because former dentist since 1984 or earlier retired just before the pandemic and I was afraid to seek out a new dentist during the pandemic. Now vaxxed, met my new dentist 5 days ago, who sent me to an endodontist (yesterday) and I'm scheduled for around $6000 worth of work between the two in the coming couple months. I'm upbeat, though. These guys ARE the best!
I'm also guilty. I'm 50 and never had a prostate exam or colonoscopy. I haven't been to a dentist for a cleaning or checkup since I was 17-18. I have no dental insurance other than extractions I believe. I do get regular bloodwork and see my regular doc because of my lifelong heart issue and diet. He's moving on next month so I guess I have to start over with another doc. I've also been seeing a cardiologist because I may need surgery again. I'll find out more next month.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,209
5,099
126
I'm also guilty. I'm 50 and never had a prostate exam or colonoscopy. I haven't been to a dentist for a cleaning or checkup since I was 17-18. I have no dental insurance other than extractions I believe. I do get regular bloodwork and see my regular doc because of my lifelong heart issue and diet. He's moving on next month so I guess I have to start over with another doc. I've also been seeing a cardiologist because I may need surgery again. I'll find out more next month.
I highly recommend you start looking for a really good dentist, not just any dentist. I'd say the same to anyone, but you, who haven't seen one in ages should especially want assurance that you're seeing a great dentist. The one I saw for the first time 5 days ago was recommended seems like a dozen times in a Nextdoor thread posted by someone looking for a good dentist in my town, over a year ago. A very smart person I know (had a job vetting doctors for prospective hire by my HMO, Kaiser Permanente) personally posted in the thread, affirming her opinion that this guy is the best, and her dentist (he has no affiliation with our HMO)! I made up my mind that he was the one I was going to call as soon as I felt confident, i.e. vaxxed. I also needed my old records from my retired dentist, and that took me a while to get, but did. Before the mid-1980's I went for some years without seeing a dentist. Did routine dental hygiene at home, meantime, but that's not enough (we should have free dental in the USA). You're a smart guy. Figure out a way to find an excellent dentist near you and take it from there! Good luck!
 
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nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
53,765
6,262
126
Never seen or heard of scenes like that. On TV they show compliant calm kids every day now, nobody obstreperous. Maybe promise an ice cream cone if they don't fight?
LOL
It's not so easy for every kid, when I cut myself on a metal object at age ten or so, they had leather straps on me and orderlies holding me down so they could give me a tetanus shot.
I'm likely on the autism spectrum, so I was already freaking out about everything else, when they added getting a shot to the mix, it was go time.

And even I went and got my Covid-19 vaccination without hesitation, because I'm not an idiot.
 
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Geekbabe

Moderator Emeritus<br>Elite Member
Oct 16, 1999
31,951
1,896
126
www.theshoppinqueen.com
Cancer patient here & hospital worker. I ran down the hall when they first released the Pfizer, got my 2nd dose in Jan and my booster at the end of August. I have seen them bringing covid patients up to ICU. Trust me, you don’t want this virus, get vaccinated, get your families vaccinated please.
 

Captante

Lifer
Oct 20, 2003
23,042
5,098
136
When was the last time you were with a young kid getting a shot? The peds nurses don't even give the kid a chance to fight, they start holding instantly.

My older daughter took the needle like a champ every time .... some tears were shed but the drama was minor and short-lived.

My younger daughter (the big tough athlete lol) on the other hand would go into hysterics at the mere mention/sight of a shot! I had to hold her on my lap when she got them but she never had to be restrained!
 

spacejamz

Lifer
Mar 31, 2003
10,541
960
126
I thought the main benefit of getting the shot was to minimize the COVID effects to your body (so you won't end up in the hospital if you do get it). At the beginning of the pandemic, kids that got COVID had minimal effects from the virus and rarely needed to go the hospital...and even if they got the vaccine, they can still pass it to others...

so what is the benefit to kids getting vaccinated for COVID?
 
Dec 10, 2005
21,799
3,679
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I thought the main benefit of getting the shot was to minimize the COVID effects to your body (so you won't end up in the hospital if you do get it). At the beginning of the pandemic, kids that got COVID had minimal effects from the virus and rarely needed to go the hospital...and even if they got the vaccine, they can still pass it to others...

so what is the benefit to kids getting vaccinated for COVID?
They can still suffer harm from covid. Maybe on average, it isn't as bad as when you're older, but it's still not great. Plus, you help to reduce a vector of continued transmission by immunizing the kids.
 

Spacehead

Lifer
Jun 2, 2002
12,890
9,294
136
I thought the main benefit of getting the shot was to minimize the COVID effects to your body (so you won't end up in the hospital if you do get it). At the beginning of the pandemic, kids that got COVID had minimal effects from the virus and rarely needed to go the hospital...and even if they got the vaccine, they can still pass it to others...

so what is the benefit to kids getting vaccinated for COVID?
There also the potential of lessening any long term covid effects. "Long covid" is real but i don't know if young kids are having issues with it or not.
 

allisolm

Elite Member
Administrator
Jan 2, 2001
24,175
2,495
136
I thought the main benefit of getting the shot was to minimize the COVID effects to your body (so you won't end up in the hospital if you do get it). At the beginning of the pandemic, kids that got COVID had minimal effects from the virus and rarely needed to go the hospital...and even if they got the vaccine, they can still pass it to others...

so what is the benefit to kids getting vaccinated for COVID?
Regarding the bolded: except for the hundreds of children whose minimal effects were so minimal that they died.
 

Zorba

Lifer
Oct 22, 1999
11,667
6,111
136
My older daughter took the needle like a champ every time .... some tears were shed but the drama was minor and short-lived.

My younger daughter (the big tough athlete lol) on the other hand would go into hysterics at the mere mention/sight of a shot! I had to hold her on my lap when she got them but she never had to be restrained!
By hold down I mean hold an arm or leg still, not like strapping them to the table or anything.
 
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Spacehead

Lifer
Jun 2, 2002
12,890
9,294
136
I thought the main benefit of getting the shot was to minimize the COVID effects to your body (so you won't end up in the hospital if you do get it). At the beginning of the pandemic, kids that got COVID had minimal effects from the virus and rarely needed to go the hospital...and even if they got the vaccine, they can still pass it to others...

so what is the benefit to kids getting vaccinated for COVID?
I think the Delta variant has also changed things from the original strain going around.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,209
5,099
126
My older daughter took the needle like a champ every time .... some tears were shed but the drama was minor and short-lived.

My younger daughter (the big tough athlete lol) on the other hand would go into hysterics at the mere mention/sight of a shot! I had to hold her on my lap when she got them but she never had to be restrained!
See, IIRC I started a thread in this forum explaining that I dislike it when on TV news they show one covid shot after another being administered, particularly the needle going into the arm. I've never made a fuss when it's time for me to get a shot, but I don't watch the needle go in, I look off into the distance... don't flinch, not a peep. Almost everyone said it doesn't bother them to see that on TV. I'm better now, I watch sometimes but I'm not crazy about it. But freaking out? What's with people? You just hold still a moment, it doesn't hurt that much. Two seconds and it's pretty much over.

OK, I got no kids, but it seems obvious to me. As your kids grow up, be with them when they get their shots until they realize it's no big deal. Having you there during that process has to be key.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,209
5,099
126
I think the Delta variant has also changed things from the original strain going around.
IIRC, I heard the other day on TV news that ~25% of the current hospitalizations from covid now are kids.
There also the potential of lessening any long term covid effects. "Long covid" is real but i don't know if young kids are having issues with it or not.
I'm pretty sure that long-covid does happen in kids sometimes.


According to the data, gathered from a follow-up survey of parents of 13,864 children aged 3-18 who had recovered from the virus, 11.2% reported symptoms of long COVID.
 
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spacejamz

Lifer
Mar 31, 2003
10,541
960
126
Regarding the bolded: except for the hundreds of children whose minimal effects were so minimal that they died.
and you don't think 100's of kids will die after they get vaccinated? how may adults who have got the vaccine have died? pretty sure underlying conditions and other factors play a huge role in that number....
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,209
5,099
126
Yeah that's what I thought, going through digestive system is not quite the same as straight into the blood stream. Or I guess in the muscle, but that's probably just a way to get it in the blood.
No, it doesn't work by getting in your blood. It's intramuscular and sort of stays there, does it's thing locally. That's why a 250lb man gets the same dose as a 120lb woman. It's evidently also why a main side effect is arm soreness.
 
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Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
62,654
9,774
126
twitter.com
No, it doesn't work by getting in your blood. It's intramuscular and sort of stays there, does it's thing locally. That's why a 250lb man gets the same dose as a 120lb woman.
Interesting, I always figured it had to get in the blood to work. Is that just specific to this vaccine or all of them?
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,209
5,099
126
Went back to 99 Ranch because I forgot one thing. A fire truck parked in the fire lane and three firefighters got out to go in. I thought it was a call but they were not wearing most of their gear, so it was just a visit. They saw the sign on the front that said masks required, laughed it off, grabbed a cart, and went in.
The news I've been seeing/hearing has me thinking that cops and firemen are among the stupidest people around us. This includes NYC, obviously. Some 60% of the deaths they suffered nationwide during the pandemic were them succumbing to covid but they stubbornly insist they won't get vaxxed even when mandated to do so and threatened with unpaid leave until they do. Morons.
 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,209
5,099
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Interesting, I always figured it had to get in the blood to work. Is that just specific to this vaccine or all of them?
I don't know the answer to that. It surprised me too, but that's how it is with the mRNA vaccines anyway.
 

Zorba

Lifer
Oct 22, 1999
11,667
6,111
136
and you don't think 100's of kids will die after they get vaccinated? how may adults who have got the vaccine have died? pretty sure underlying conditions and other factors play a huge role in that number....
It'll give them roughly a 91% lower chance of going to the hospital and somewhere between 91% and 100% at preventing death.

Good enough for my kids. If you want you kids to be 10x more likely to end up in the hospital that's up to you.
 
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Zorba

Lifer
Oct 22, 1999
11,667
6,111
136
LOL
It's not so easy for every kid, when I cut myself on a metal object at age ten or so, they had leather straps on me and orderlies holding me down so they could give me a tetanus shot.
I'm likely on the autism spectrum, so I was already freaking out about everything else, when they added getting a shot to the mix, it was go time.

And even I went and got my Covid-19 vaccination without hesitation, because I'm not an idiot.
What's funny, my daughter will try to hide her leg or shoulder from a shot, will fight COVID tests to high heaven, but when she needed stitches not a problem at all. She didn't move or cry, or fight at all. Even the doctor was commenting about how she was the most calm toddler she'd ever put stitches in.

I think peds nurses are so good at giving shots to toddlers most parents don't even realize they are hiding the leg down. The nurses at her normal office can do a shot or COVID test in seconds regardless of what she's doing. CVS and other test site though try to wait until the kid is completely calm and relaxed. And at least my daughter one she realizes she can gum up the works, she will. Again, not going nuts or screaming, but not giving them a clear path and moving around.
 
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Zorba

Lifer
Oct 22, 1999
11,667
6,111
136
Interesting, I always figured it had to get in the blood to work. Is that just specific to this vaccine or all of them?
I don't know of any vaccine that is straight into the blood, nearly all go into the muscle just like the COVID shot. A few go under the skin. Live polio vaccine is giving orally. And you can get a nasal spray for the flu.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
33,209
5,099
126
Sidney Crosby tests positive.

Saw on network news last night that reigning NFL MVP Aaron Rodgers tested positive and will miss "the big game" being Green Bay vs. Kansas City this coming weekend. They said he says he's "immunized," but that the NFL has been considering him unvaxxed by virtue of the info they have.

According to ESPN, "The NFL has considered Rodgers as unvaccinated since the start of the season." NFL.com also reports that the Packers quarterback has not been vaccinated against COVID-19.
 

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