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NON_POLITICAL China Coronavirus THREAD

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Svnla

Lifer
Nov 10, 2003
17,999
1,394
126
Two weeks shut down already? How about another two weeks for the largest city in the country and other provinces too. The working poor folks are screwed because no work = no money = no food/money for rent and other expenses.

HCMC, 18 southern localities extend social distancing for another two weeks - VnExpress International

Containers to store bodies.



Record high number in ICU in Malaysia.


Look like travel to Asia countries will be on hold for a long while.
.
 
Dec 10, 2005
21,211
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It'd be difficult with us. As of now, you need executive permission just to go into the office, and even then its mask up, temp check at the door, etc.
Yeah, I was thinking more long term, after covid settles down.

Many in my company were office-based pre-COVID. I haven't followed office reopening very closely, but I believe the office is allowing 1/4-1/2 capacity. You don't need permission to get in, but you need to do the following: a) send in proof of vaccination for it to be cataloged; b) book a desk ~2 days in advance; c) day-of screening questions about any symptoms. Some of my colleagues have taken advantage of the office reopening - I think they like the change of scenery, and it's nice to be able to see people, especially if you want to have some group meetings.
 

Zorba

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 1999
9,998
4,019
136
I think the current best guess is, it prevents an infection from landing you in a hospital 99% of the time, but it doesn't prevent you from spreading it, as immunization usually would to a virus. Normally by the time the virus has replicated enough to reasonably start infecting others, your immune system goes all sparta on it. This replicates so damned fast that you're breathing it out before your immune system has a chance to start firing up... Like, within hours of infection you're a vector.

Anyhow, not sure how to get rid of it assuming the above is true. A handful of people in an office could just bounce it between themselves and their families in perpetuity.
I know some companies are working on nasal spray vaccines, that in theory should give a better/fast response in the upper respiratory track.

If everyone gets a vaccine or is exposed, so an infection just becomes a bad cold, not sure we truly have to "get rid of it."
 

Zorba

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 1999
9,998
4,019
136
Just saw this. A company has made animal vaccines and is giving it away to zoos across the country (for the moment at least).

 

gill77

Senior member
Aug 3, 2006
641
182
116
https://www.cnbc.com/2021/07/30/cdc-study-shows-74percent-of-people-infected-in-massachusetts-covid-outbreak-were-fully-vaccinated.html

Interesting data. The good news is there were no deaths among the vaccinated or those not vaccinated.
Key Points
  • About three-fourths of people infected in a Massachusetts Covid-19 outbreak were fully vaccinated, according to new data published Friday by the CDC.
  • The new data, published in the U.S. agency’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, also found that fully vaccinated people who get infected carry as much of the virus in their nose as unvaccinated people.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
31,132
3,968
126
Just posted at my local Nextdoor site, by a friend of the poster. This person is in Orlando, Florida, said to be "extremely fit":

My "Breakthrough Case" Experience - After a wonderful dinner at Ocean Prime, we went out past our bedtime to join friends downtown to celebrate my birthday on Saturday, July 3rd. Once inside Corona, we took off our masks, all of us were vaccinated and we passed a great time together in a crowded and festive bar. Monday I was annoyingly tired but I did yardwork and hit the gym (masked as always) anyway. I went to bed early and woke up late Tuesday; it was hard to swallow and I had spiked a fever overnight, my sheets were soaked. I was sick with massive headaches like never before, bodyaches and sore throat, and I rode a fever for the next 12 days from my bedroom. On day 13, I went to my doctor after the fever finally broke. Today I am passed the symptoms and continue to recover. I have not been so sick for so long for as long as I can remember. I am a COVID-19 "breakthrough case". After doing the right thing for over a year, I caught the Delta variant and it made me sick. I fear I passed it on, and of course anyone could have passed it on to me, vaccinated or unvaccinated, that night or anytime/place really - at the gym, dinner or even from my husband who works with a COVID unit at a nursing home. But that night, we were unmasked per the CDC advice at the time which we now know was premature. That said, the vaccine may well have saved me a trip to the ER, or worse. The vaccine did not keep me from contracting the virus and unfortunately, possibly sharing it. I know of two others whose paths we crossed that Saturday who tested positive when I did and one (unvaccinated) got sick along with her family. This is my experience, draw your own conclusions; I won't tell anyone what to do. By now you know the right thing to do for your own health and the health of others. Me? I will continue to follow the science and advice of local leaders. I will be limiting exposure, practicing safety protocols and wearing my mask in public. And I will be first in line for the booster. For my own health and for the greater good.
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
37,301
11,757
136
Just posted at my local Nextdoor site, by a friend of the poster. This person is in Orlando, Florida, said to be "extremely fit":

My "Breakthrough Case" Experience - After a wonderful dinner at Ocean Prime, we went out past our bedtime to join friends downtown to celebrate my birthday on Saturday, July 3rd. Once inside Corona, we took off our masks, all of us were vaccinated and we passed a great time together in a crowded and festive bar. Monday I was annoyingly tired but I did yardwork and hit the gym (masked as always) anyway. I went to bed early and woke up late Tuesday; it was hard to swallow and I had spiked a fever overnight, my sheets were soaked. I was sick with massive headaches like never before, bodyaches and sore throat, and I rode a fever for the next 12 days from my bedroom. On day 13, I went to my doctor after the fever finally broke. Today I am passed the symptoms and continue to recover. I have not been so sick for so long for as long as I can remember. I am a COVID-19 "breakthrough case". After doing the right thing for over a year, I caught the Delta variant and it made me sick. I fear I passed it on, and of course anyone could have passed it on to me, vaccinated or unvaccinated, that night or anytime/place really - at the gym, dinner or even from my husband who works with a COVID unit at a nursing home. But that night, we were unmasked per the CDC advice at the time which we now know was premature. That said, the vaccine may well have saved me a trip to the ER, or worse. The vaccine did not keep me from contracting the virus and unfortunately, possibly sharing it. I know of two others whose paths we crossed that Saturday who tested positive when I did and one (unvaccinated) got sick along with her family. This is my experience, draw your own conclusions; I won't tell anyone what to do. By now you know the right thing to do for your own health and the health of others. Me? I will continue to follow the science and advice of local leaders. I will be limiting exposure, practicing safety protocols and wearing my mask in public. And I will be first in line for the booster. For my own health and for the greater good.

Sick at home instead of sick in the hospital or in the ground is pretty pretty good. I got the flu last year and his/her experience is about the same as what I had.
 
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Dec 10, 2005
21,211
2,784
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Sick at home instead of sick in the hospital or in the ground is pretty pretty good. I got the flu last year and his/her experience is about the same as what I had.
Yep. The vaccines are doing their job - preventing hospitalization and death.

It could certainly suck if you get a breakthrough infection when vaccinated, but it's better than being in the ICU and dying.

If only more people would get vaccinated to reduce the unvaccinated pool of people that are throwing fuel on the fire...
 

blackangst1

Lifer
Feb 23, 2005
20,977
848
126
Yeah, I was thinking more long term, after covid settles down.

Many in my company were office-based pre-COVID. I haven't followed office reopening very closely, but I believe the office is allowing 1/4-1/2 capacity. You don't need permission to get in, but you need to do the following: a) send in proof of vaccination for it to be cataloged; b) book a desk ~2 days in advance; c) day-of screening questions about any symptoms. Some of my colleagues have taken advantage of the office reopening - I think they like the change of scenery, and it's nice to be able to see people, especially if you want to have some group meetings.
Yeah we're similar. No more than 25% capacity, reserve a desk with iOffice. I always joke in our department meetings we're gonna go to the office to sit on Teams virtual meetings all day lol.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Brainonska511
Dec 10, 2005
21,211
2,784
126
Yeah we're similar. No more than 25% capacity, reserve a desk with iOffice. I always joke in our department meetings we're gonna go to the office to sit on Teams virtual meetings all day lol.
I know that some teams have tried to coordinate their office visits, but it does seem like that - people go in to sit on Teams, lol.
 
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blackangst1

Lifer
Feb 23, 2005
20,977
848
126
I know that some teams have tried to coordinate their office visits, but it does seem like that - people go in to sit on Teams, lol.
Yeah. The plan is to go back to office in Sept, with everyone on the same team all going in. At least for me as a network security engineer, 99% of my meetings involve other teams...software platforms, cloud team, server team, desktop team, etc so that means virtual meetings.
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
37,301
11,757
136
My husband has been going in to the office ahead of the official full return. Some amount of people are going at least part of the week just to get out of the house.
 

Caveman

Platinum Member
Nov 18, 1999
2,458
13
81
Yep. The vaccines are doing their job - preventing hospitalization and death.

It could certainly suck if you get a breakthrough infection when vaccinated, but it's better than being in the ICU and dying.

If only more people would get vaccinated to reduce the unvaccinated pool of people that are throwing fuel on the fire...
Key Points
  • About three-fourths of people infected in a Massachusetts Covid-19 outbreak were fully vaccinated, according to new data published Friday by the CDC.
  • The new data, published in the U.S. agency’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, also found that fully vaccinated people who get infected carry as much of the virus in their nose as unvaccinated people.
On a related note (though I have not had time to vet) was a study I saw the that indicated the safest folks to be around are the unvaccinated that have already had the virus. They're less likely to be carriers of the virus since their natural immunity is 40X stronger against fighting a new variant than someone with a vaccination. Also, as the data from the CNBC link above says, there were more vaccinated than unvaccinated in the case who were infected. This is appearing in other places and is why the CDC is recommending all wear masks now based on these data. If in fact symptoms are minimized for the vaccinated, they would by definition be the dominant spreaders since they would not be aware they are sick. The good news in the CNCBC data is that not a single person in all who were infected (vaxxed or unvaxxed) died.
 

uclaLabrat

Diamond Member
Aug 2, 2007
4,695
1,112
136
Wanna see data on that. Everything I've read said the vaccines are giving some like 6 fold greater protection than post-infection immunity?
 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
31,132
3,968
126
Video makes these points (among others):

Lack of 2nd dose is a big reason Delta is surging in American midwest (just one dose is largely ineffective in preventing infection).

A single dose of vaccine majorly boosts immune response to Delta for those previously infected with covid-19.

Cites studies, reveals data:

 

allisolm

Elite Member
Administrator
Jan 2, 2001
23,941
2,171
136
And for the milestones in Florida:

Not only does FL have more new cases for the last 2 days straight than at any time since the start of the pandemic but it has a record number of hospitalizations.

My county has 2 hospitals and one of them has a record number of covid patients. More than at any time in the pandemic. More than they had before vaccines were invented. 93% are unvaccinated and all of the ICU patients are unvaccinated. And these are otherwise healthy people 20-50. The second hospital is single digits short of the all time high in hospitalizations.

I'm back to wearing a mask inside and I feel like we're back to square one.
 

Roger Wilco

Golden Member
Mar 20, 2017
1,186
758
136
Animal reservoirs may be an important thing to keep track of as well.

"385 blood samples collected as part of regular wildlife-surveillance activities between January and March 2021 in four US states — Michigan, Pennsylvania, Illinois and New York. They found that a striking 40% of the samples contained SARS-CoV-2 antibodies,"

 

thestrangebrew1

Diamond Member
Dec 7, 2011
3,198
254
126
A couple we're friends with were non-vaxxers and have covid now. The wife is pretty healthy and she has symptoms and feels like crap. Her husband is super sick and has been in the hospital for the last 5 days. They were going to intubate him on Saturday but his levels increased and by yesterday the docs felt like he was well enough to feed some real food. We're all hoping he doesn't regress but we'll see. This is probably the worst of all the people I've known to have caught covid.
 

Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
6,073
743
126

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
37,301
11,757
136
Too bad the places it's needed the most won't do it.
Lot of people from those places go to NYC though for work or tourism.

Sooner rather than later the TSA should require vaccination proof for air travel.
 
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