Nocua Liquid Metal on a 1950x Threadripper

Apr 26, 2018
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#1
I set out to build my own PC for the first time. I'm a musician/ producer - not a techy. So, I did about as much research as I thought I could, and consulted many forums, YouTubers, and Micro Center employees.

Anyway - I began building my system after getting all the components - but because of the mounting socket on the motherboard I had, the FoxCon (I think it's called) I decided to take it in to a professional to install the CPU and my Enermax 240 TR4 AIO because the #1 screw was just NOT catching for me and I was seriously scared to continue.

3 weeks later - I call him up to tell him about the really low temperatures I'm seeing and how great it is to overclock with low temps on my system - so I ask him what thermal paste he used...

Noctua Liquid Metal...

Which I heard is CORROSIVE to the Threadripper.

Now - before I go in and ask that he remove it and replace it - or purchase me a NEW CPU or something like that...

IS THIS A PROBLEM?

Should I even be concerned?

Is this something that I can solve myself?

Is it EVEN solvable?

Or has this already done PERMANENT damage that will just continue to ruin my CPU over time?

Keep in mind that I think I hit the "Silicone Lottery" with this CPU. Running 4 GHZ @ 1.23125 Volts STABLE ATM.
 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
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#2
I don't know where you heard that it was bad for TR, or how it could be corrosive to metal. I doubt this could be true even.

Seems to be proved here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5tQx1LYDKsk that its fine, and they are using one the actual core on a delidded CPU.
 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
17,363
755
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#4
This "Ihs is nickel plated copper. Nickels reaction with gallium occurs at an incredibly slow rate. Could be years before you see any kind of noticeable wetting/corrosion"
comment (I would say worst case) means that it will be so many years out, even if it does have a reaction, that the CPU would be very slow at that time, and out of service most likely.

Edit: after the second link, if there is any chance he is right, and the TR IHS is aluminum, then get that stuff off ! Its not hard do do, remove 4 nuts from the heatsinks unit, clean both sides with isopropol achcohol, and apply something like AS5 (or the compound that came with the Enermax, it can't void your warranty)
 
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Apr 26, 2018
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#5
After finally getting my AIO problems resolved - now I have to worry about my CPU being corroded by Liquid Metal. Building your own PC is so stressful... Well - for someone like me who has no experience.
 
Apr 26, 2018
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#6
This "Ihs is nickel plated copper. Nickels reaction with gallium occurs at an incredibly slow rate. Could be years before you see any kind of noticeable wetting/corrosion"
comment (I would say worst case) means that it will be so many years out, even if it does have a reaction, that the CPU would be very slow at that time, and out of service most likely.
OH! Ok - thats something I didn't notice.

Right on.

So thats worst case scenario.

So - if I wanted to clean off the liquid metal - I could do so without having to worry about it corroding my CPU?
 
Apr 26, 2018
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#8
Well - I'm still glad I made this thread. I've heard this rumor going around a LOT. And its good to hear it cleared up. Even though I wish my CPU wasn't the guinea pig.
 
Mar 10, 2004
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#9
That cooler comes with a tube of thermal paste. There's no need to use any other kind.
EDIT: Oh I see, you used that up on the initial install.
 
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Apr 26, 2018
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#10
Yeah - and also it was actually a repair tech that put it on without asking me first. Which is not cool.
 
Apr 1, 2015
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#11
Yeah - and also it was actually a repair tech that put it on without asking me first. Which is not cool.
All IHSs, regardless AMD or Intel, are nickel plated copper. They are fine to use with liquid metal, as is copper heat plate heatsinks. Aluminum heat sinks do not mix with gallium in liquid metal thermal pastes. That is like stock aluminium air coolers. Now, over time, an alloy can form between the nickel and liquid metal alloy. This can "stain" a CPU's IHS. It does not really impact the product. In fact, Der8aur, one of the best overclockers in the world, recently posted a video about cleaning off this alloy on his YouTube page. Considering the most higher quality after market heatsinks do not use an aluminum base, you should be fine. This isn't something to worry about unless worried about a vertical motherboard and over application or poor mounting of the sink with a potential to allow leakage to drip from the components and potentially fry something. If applied properly, generally, even in a vertical position for the MB, you should be fine. I do not know your rig, the person's expertise, etc., so you can assess your own risks.
 
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Apr 26, 2018
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#12
AJC9988 - thank you very much for responding with that information. You have put me at ease. I DO trust the repair tech that put the compound on my CPU - I believe that he probably knew what you know. I have just been hearing all these rumors and wanted to verify before confronting him about it and asking him to remove it.

NOW - I'm very glad I had patience and didn't overreact - because we have a really good relationship and this could have damaged it in some way.
 
Jun 3, 2011
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#13
i think you've already been answered. Consider that Noctua is the n.1 manufacturer of CPU heatsinks, they would know better than not advertise that a certain thermal paste cannot go on certain CPUs.
also, the "corrosive" thing applies - as far as i know - only to a couple very rare thermal paste brands which are only incompatible with *some* fan bases (aluminum ones), and they make sure to tell you anyway.
 


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