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Microsoft officially announces Windows 11

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coercitiv

Diamond Member
Jan 24, 2014
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This whole fiasco seems like it was the work of amateurs. Have feeling there will be some serious walking back of their whole approach to this at some point.
It's not a bad idea per se, since it forces OEM machines to be more secure. But they needed to announce this move long time ago, like 12 months earlier at the very least. This would have had a proper effect on newer OEM machines and also allowed customers to make more informed purchases. My last computer purchase would have been different had I know about this, for example (not that important for me, but still).

Now it'll all come out as a sleazy move to sell new computers, possibly sabotage the move entirely and also induce a negative impression on Microsoft's rebranding just like Win 10 tracking did. All because they refuse to plan and communicate properly.
 
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ithehappy

Senior member
Oct 13, 2013
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Not necessarily, I just enabled PTT on 6600K / Z170 board. Had to update the BIOS though. The system still fails the Win 11 check, but since I'm booting in legacy mode I expect that to be the problem instead.
Thanks. I thought I was running latest BIOS FW but apparently not. While downloading the BIOS from Asus site I found something called Intel ME right below it. Now Windows 10 automatic driver installation have ruined me, totally forgot what all these are. Is this something important I should install prior to updating BIOS?
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
14,935
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Thanks. I thought I was running latest BIOS FW but apparently not. While downloading the BIOS from Asus site I found something called Intel ME right below it. Now Windows 10 automatic driver installation have ruined me, totally forgot what all these are. Is this something important I should install prior to updating BIOS?
That should be the "multi-core enhancement" option that is basically overclocking your CPU by throwing higher voltages at it.

That's something that's enabled automatically, which I immediately turn off when getting a new motherboard.

I just realized you said it was available as a download, so that's actually Intel Management Engine........

I don't use that anymore on any my PCs.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_Management_Engine
 
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WilliamM2

Golden Member
Jun 14, 2012
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So I figured out that after you enable fTPM in the bios, you have to exit the bios and re-enter it. Go to trusted computing and enable "security device". It's geyed out before you exit and re-enter the uefi again.

So now the tool tells me this PC meets all requirements. Although I did NOT enable secure boot, or disable csm. ???

Wonder if it will really work like that.
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
14,935
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It's not a bad idea per se, since it forces OEM machines to be more secure. But they needed to announce this move long time ago, like 12 months earlier at the very least. This would have had a proper effect on newer OEM machines and also allowed customers to make more informed purchases. My last computer purchase would have been different had I know about this, for example (not that important for me, but still).

Now it'll all come out as a sleazy move to sell new computers, possibly sabotage the move entirely and also induce a negative impression on Microsoft's rebranding just like Win 10 tracking did. All because they refuse to plan and communicate properly.
That's how I exactly feel about this situation.

I'm all for more computer security with how things are with all the attacks/exploits, but Microsoft 100% should have made future requirements public back when they made this decision. Older non-supported (by the manufacturer) hardware has risks no doubt

Releasing a half-baked utility and then publishing the hardware requirements only months from the launch date is a completely brain-dead move on their part.

I mean these companies obviously pay a lot of money to people who are "book smart", but they all seem incapable of obvious common sense decisions.
 
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GrumpyMan

Diamond Member
May 14, 2001
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It took me a bit to find the settings in my bios, but they are there a little hidden. Asus calls them PTT and has them under the Advanced/PCH-FW settings. In the Boot section you also have to turn on Secure Boot. I was upset at first thinking to myself how can a machine I built a couple of years ago not be able to run W11? But since I turned all that on I can successfully install W11 if I want to.
 
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UsandThem

Elite Member
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May 4, 2000
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I was upset at first thinking to myself how can a machine I built a couple of years ago not be able to run W11?
Count yourself lucky as apparently there are some pricey options from just a few years ago that won't work their default shipping configurations:

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/windows-11-leaves-computers-out
Intel’s Xeon W-3175X, which launched in Q4 of 2018 for $2999 and sports 16 cores, drops into a platform that does not come with built-in TPM support. You can purchase a motherboard that has a TPM header and add a TPM chip after the fact, but many systems don’t have this by default. It’s hard to argue that a massive HEDT (high end desktop) system from less than three years ago should not be able to run Windows 11.
 
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ithehappy

Senior member
Oct 13, 2013
540
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It took me a bit to find the settings in my bios, but they are there a little hidden. Asus calls them PTT and has them under the Advanced/PCH-FW settings. In the Boot section you also have to turn on Secure Boot. I was upset at first thinking to myself how can a machine I built a couple of years ago not be able to run W11? But since I turned all that on I can successfully install W11 if I want to.
Thanks for this post. Saved stupid folks like myself many mins.

Yay. Now my outdated 6700K CPU is legitimately compatible for Windows 11. :/ Since enabling this thing that utility called PC Health Check isn't opening anymore though, just shows preparing to install an update toast for a sec or two and then goes away. Meh I could care less.

A screenshot for dumb folks like me: https://ibb.co/sQ0B9vN
 
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PingSpike

Lifer
Feb 25, 2004
21,602
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Microsoft management seems so detached from common sense at times:

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/windows-11-compatibility-checker-new-update-error




Why wouldn't the first thing they think of before releasing the upgrade tool to the public be "It will tell people exactly why their PC won't be able to be updated, right?". Was there not one person of management who even brought this idea up?

:rolleyes:
You're talking about the company that replaced error codes that you could google with "Something happened. : ("
 

mxnerd

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2007
6,141
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I was able to install Win11 on my old Dell machine (TPM 1.2). No worry for most people who bought their machines in the past few years.

 
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JEDI

Lifer
Sep 25, 2001
27,317
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Announcement:

Upgrade to the New Windows 11 OS | Microsoft

Looks good, and apparently they said this which is good news:

"As Microsoft Chief Product Officer Panos Panay noted in today’s announcement, the overall idea behind the design is to make you feel “an incredible sense of calm,” but at the same time, the Windows team has also worked to make it a lot faster. Windows Updates, for example, are supposed to be 40 percent faster, but Panay also noted that starting up your machine and even browsing should feel much faster."

You will be able to run android apps too:

https://www.windowscentral.com/microsoft-announces-windows-11-will-be-able-run-android-apps
if history is a lesson, skip every other Win version.

Dos 6.x, skip Win95, win98, skip win2k, win xp, skip win Vista, Win 7, skip Win8, Win 10, skip win 11
 

PowerEngineer

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 2001
3,350
394
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Thanks for this post. Saved stupid folks like myself many mins.

Yay. Now my outdated 6700K CPU is legitimately compatible for Windows 11. :/ Since enabling this thing that utility called PC Health Check isn't opening anymore though, just shows preparing to install an update toast for a sec or two and then goes away. Meh I could care less.

A screenshot for dumb folks like me: https://ibb.co/sQ0B9vN
Hmmm... Now I'm confused. 😵

I also have an "outdated" 6700K CPU in a Gigabyte Z170X UD5 TH and have been thinking that I needed to plug one of these GC-TPM 2.0 boards into the TPM header in order to have any chance of passing the compatibility check (I did get one ordered before they sold out). I didn't think the 6700K would support PTT? I obviously have a lot to learn... 🤔

EDIT: Well, I just found the PTT option in the Gigabyte BIOS settings. I left it disabled as I suppose I will first see if the hardware board works for me. If not, I can try the emulation. This is not the first time I have wasted $40. 😔
 
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jpiniero

Lifer
Oct 1, 2010
10,075
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Hmmm... Now I'm confused. 😵

I also have an "outdated" 6700K CPU in a Gigabyte Z170X UD5 TH and have been thinking that I needed to plug one of these GC-TPM 2.0 boards into the TPM header in order to have any chance of passing the compatibility check (I did get one ordered before they sold out). I didn't think the 6700K would support PTT? I obviously have a lot to learn... 🤔

EDIT: Well, I just found the PTT option in the Gigabyte BIOS settings. I left it disabled as I suppose I will first see if the hardware board works for me. If not, I can try the emulation. This is not the first time I have wasted $40. 😔
Shoulda waited since MS is saying that Skylake is not supported. It may still work but there's no guarantee that the final version of 11 will install.
 

Insert_Nickname

Diamond Member
May 6, 2012
4,217
781
126
This whole fiasco seems like it was the work of amateurs. Have feeling there will be some serious walking back of their whole approach to this at some point.
More likely "lets see what we can get away with". Essentially a trial balloon.

Happens in politics all the time.
 
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coercitiv

Diamond Member
Jan 24, 2014
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More likely "lets see what we can get away with". Essentially a trial balloon.
It doesn't seem to be the case this time, Microsoft started demanding OEMs to ship TPM 2.0 enabled by default on new models ever since 2016.
Since July 28, 2016, all new device models, lines or series (or if you are updating the hardware configuration of a existing model, line or series with a major update, such as CPU, graphic cards) must implement and enable by default TPM 2.0 (details in section 3.7 of the Minimum hardware requirements page). The requirement to enable TPM 2.0 only applies to the manufacturing of new devices.
and they were making arguably good use of it already:
TPM secures the PIN, helps encrypt passwords, and builds on our overall Windows 10 experience story for security as a critical pillar. Using Windows on a system with a TPM enables a deeper and broader level of security coverage.
I simply can't understand why they waited so much time without warning consumers too. All they needed to do was to start with OEMs in 2016 and announce consumers in 2018 that starting with 2020 TPM enabled devices will get front row seats for Windows updates and features. Nice 2 year cadence, no drama.
 
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mxnerd

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2007
6,141
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The requirement is only for new machine. You don't need to trust the compatibility software test result for old machines since many people already installed Win 11 under many different configurations.


https://download.microsoft.com/download/7/8/8/788bf5ab-0751-4928-a22c-dffdc23c27f2/Minimum%20Hardware%20Requirements%20for%20Windows%2011.pdf
 

Insert_Nickname

Diamond Member
May 6, 2012
4,217
781
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TPM has been around a lot longer, since Vista I think, but it's never been enforced as a requirement before now. It's always been an optional feature. That's what I don't get, why take a previously optional feature and suddenly turn it into a requirement? Many newer systems don't even have fTPM/iPPT turned on by default.
 

WelshBloke

Lifer
Jan 12, 2005
28,262
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People constantly complain that Microsoft keep supporting legacy hardware and that they should move on.
Microsoft makes it so that something that they have been telling OEMs that they should include for years is now required on new hardware and everyone appears to be losing their shit.
 
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jpiniero

Lifer
Oct 1, 2010
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People constantly complain that Microsoft keep supporting legacy hardware and that they should move on.
Microsoft makes it so that something that they have been telling OEMs that they should include for years is now required on new hardware and everyone appears to be losing their shit.
It sounds more like the people complaining are mostly DIYers.
 

JEDI

Lifer
Sep 25, 2001
27,317
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What happend to Win10 is the last Windows to be produced?

But Microsoft went instead with Windows 10 because they wanted to signify that the coming Windows release would be the last "major" Windows update.
Going forward, Microsoft is planning to make regular, smaller updates to the Windows 10 codebase, rather than pushing out new major updates years apart.

Windows will be updated on a much more regular basis. So there may never be a Windows 11 or Windows 12, just an evolving and ever-better Windows.


What happend to Win10 is the last Windows to be produced?
 

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