Is the USA the best country to live in?

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charrison

Lifer
Oct 13, 1999
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Originally posted by: athithi
Personally, I think the US is the best place to live in if you are between the ages of 16 and 60. There're plenty of reasons why I feel so, but the most significant ones would be independence and self-reliance.

That pretty much sums it up.
 

zCypher

Diamond Member
Aug 18, 2002
6,115
171
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Originally posted by: LongCoolMother
id say some of the european countries, and canada, are better places to live. id say USA is best overall for working, getting an education. i dont think its the best place to live (high cost of living etc.) but its definately not bad.
It's only good for getting an education if you have a boatload of cash, which many people do not. Canada.. actually no, Quebec specifically is the best place to get an education, since tuition is government funded, and ANYBODY can get through college and university on their own.

As for other aspects, don't ask me.. :p
 

BaliBabyDoc

Lifer
Jan 20, 2001
10,737
0
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one of the better countries to live in yes
For the poor, countries like Canada, Norway, Sweden, et al are much better. For quality of public education (K-12), almost all developed countries are preferable. For quality of higher education, the US is second to none. If you are super wealthy and don't like to share, US taxes are onerous compared to havens like the Caymans or Costa Rica. If you want to become super wealthy, I'm not sure any country in the world offers greater opportunity than the US (except maybe being a big wig in Russia, China, Indonesia, etc).

Ultimately, it depends on what you call living and how much you care about the quality of life for your fellow citizens.
 

Electrode

Diamond Member
May 4, 2001
6,063
2
81
Well, the US is the only country I've ever lived in, and from what I've seen, it's a fairly good place to live. However, some fields, such as IT and medical research, are better served in another nation. The former is being torn apart by IP lawyers, the zaibatsu-esque corporations they represent, and a legislature that doesn't understand it, except for what the aforementioned corporations tell them. The latter is restrained by the religious right, which holds so much clout that they can even prevent public schools from teaching students about evolution.

If you're not working in or looking to work in one of those fields, the US is a great place to be. But if you want to do anything fruitful in IT or medical research, it's not a good place to be. That's why I'm planning to leave.
 

BaliBabyDoc

Lifer
Jan 20, 2001
10,737
0
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Personally, I think the US is the best place to live in if you are between the ages of 16 and 60. There're plenty of reasons why I feel so, but the most significant ones would be independence and self-reliance.

Interesting perspective . . . unfortunately many of your prospects for the future will depend on what happens to you between ages 0-16.
 

Saltin

Platinum Member
Jul 21, 2001
2,175
0
0
The US is the best place in the world to live if you are well off/rich.
Even the middle class there is leaps above most countries.

There is, however, more to life than material wealth. This is why countries like Canada and Sweden score above the US. There is too much crime in the US, it isnt as safe as other places. Education is good if you can afford it, otherwise it's not so hot. People are too fat/unfit in the US as well.....

 

charrison

Lifer
Oct 13, 1999
17,033
1
81
Originally posted by: Electrode
Well, the US is the only country I've ever lived in, and from what I've seen, it's a fairly good place to live. However, some fields, such as IT and medical research, are better served in another nation. The former is being torn apart by IP lawyers, the zaibatsu-esque corporations they represent, and a legislature that doesn't understand it, except for what the aforementioned corporations tell them. The latter is restrained by the religious right, which holds so much clout that they can even prevent public schools from teaching students about evolution.

If you're not working in or looking to work in one of those fields, the US is a great place to be. But if you want to do anything fruitful in IT or medical research, it's not a good place to be. That's why I'm planning to leave.

You forget that the US is the leader in IT and medical research.
 

BaliBabyDoc

Lifer
Jan 20, 2001
10,737
0
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The latter is restrained by the religious right, which holds so much clout that they can even prevent public schools from teaching students about evolution
I disagree. Very little medical research perturbs the religious right. The media has hyped cloning and associated technology (genomics/proteomics) but these fields are more hindered by typical turf wars and financial concerns than outside influences. If you are looking for something along the lines of The Island of Dr. Moreau (I guess the movie more than the book) then by all means you will have to seek out some fringe locale to work. Otherwise, every region (and many states) in the US offer biotech opportunities beyond compare . . . with the exception of certain institutes in France, Germany, UK, Japan . . .
 

glenn1

Lifer
Sep 6, 2000
25,383
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Not really a fair question. The United States isn't really in the same league as Germany, France, Great Britain, etc, whether you consider it in terms of landmass, size and scope of the economy, and sheer diversity of its population. If taken as a whole, the continent of Europe might offer a reasonable substitute choice to the U.S., but comparing the U.S. to Great Britain is like comparing Rhode Island to California. It's just not a fair fight.
 

Hammer

Lifer
Oct 19, 2001
13,217
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81
to live in yes. but its cool to visit other places, so im not knocking other countries. :p
 

burnedout

Diamond Member
Oct 12, 1999
6,249
2
0
Originally posted by: PoPPeR
so society as a whole is basically similar around the world? From listening to my German teacher talk about Germany, things are greatly different there. Besides the noticeable difference in country size, the way they treat alcohol, drugs, education, etc. is really different from the US. I personally would rather live in their society if they spoke english :) Well, aside from the barely any teens with cars and no space to park part.
Germany is a wonderful, beautiful land, but has its own drawbacks as well.

Conveniences, such as shopping and customer services, are much more limited there because of cultural differences and governmental control. Shopping on "Langer Samstag" can easily become an adventure in stress management. The telephone company was notorious for taking their sweet-@ss time hooking up a telephone connection under the Bundespost, although I heard this has now changed for the better since Telekom was privatized.

Even though the German government recently cut personal taxes (I think), the take is still higher than here. Personally, I think the quality of health care is much better in the USA. Their dental establishment is about a quarter century behind ours. Petroleum products are outrageously expensive. There are comparitively less employment opportunities as the German service industry has barely evolved.

Still, I absolutely loved the place. Had once seriously considered purchasing an apartment in either Haiger or Herborn.

 

FrancesBeansRevenge

Platinum Member
Jun 6, 2001
2,181
0
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Funnily enough as an American I always thought I lived in the best country in the world.
Then when I lived in Canada for a short time I found out Canadians live in the best country in the world.
Then when I stayed in Britain for a short while I found out Brits live in the best country in the world.
However, now that I live in Australia I have been informed that Australians live in the best country in the world.

And every one who told me they lived in the greatest country in the world had quite a convincing argument. :)

Anyone see a theme?
 

charrison

Lifer
Oct 13, 1999
17,033
1
81
Originally posted by: FrancesBeansRevenge
Funnily enough as an American I always thought I lived in the best country in the world.
Then when I lived in Canada for a short time I found out Canadians live in the best country in the world.
Then when I stayed in Britain for a short while I found out Brits live in the best country in the world.
However, now that I live in Australia I have been informed that Australians live in the best country in the world.

And every one who told me they lived in the greatest country in the world had quite a convincing argument. :)

Anyone see a theme?

Home is always best.
 

Dragnov

Diamond Member
Apr 24, 2001
6,878
0
0
Yep.

If it wasn't, why are all the immigrants trying to come to the US? I'm sure more Europeans come over to the US to live than Americans go to Europe. Same goes for any other country.

When I visited Korea for several weeks I loved it. But theres tons, I realized I took for granted in the US. As far as government, thats a different issue and would vary by what the persons ideologies are. The US has the most stable economy in the world, you can find jobs and homes to whatever your likings pretty much, etc etc.
 

SlowSS

Golden Member
Nov 28, 2002
1,573
1
0
I've been to many countries in Europe, Asia, South America, along with Australia. Although I enjoyed visiting many foreign countries,

I must say, USA is the best place to live in, imo. However, I wouldn't mind living in Australia.;)
 

DiamondJ

Banned
Dec 7, 2002
352
0
0
Is the USA the best country to live in?

I dunno...I hear Communist China is pretty nice this time of year....
rolleye.gif
 

NewSc2

Diamond Member
Apr 21, 2002
3,325
2
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I'll chime in with Australia/New Zealand. I think Americans overall aren't that friendly, unless you look to the Midwest and South. (nothing like Southern hospitality...)

From what I gather, Australia/New Zealanders are extremely open and welcoming, I'd like to stay there for a bit.
 

StageLeft

No Lifer
Sep 29, 2000
70,150
5
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There is no right or wrong answer. Merely what you prefer yourself. I've lived in England, Canada, and the US, and the only two places I'd like to live again are either the US where I am now or Canada in the future. I don't think I'd make a good fit for England, though it's my third pick (distantly). If I do end up staying long term in the US it's for the money and no other reason. Perhaps I'm a bit too materialistic, but there is more money in the US than in Canada, hence the reason I could see myself staying here for the long haul.
 

StageLeft

No Lifer
Sep 29, 2000
70,150
5
0
But if you want to do anything fruitful in IT or medical research, it's not a good place to be. That's why I'm planning to leave.
Where you gonna go? Japan? IT at least sucks the dick in most of the western world these days.
 

charrison

Lifer
Oct 13, 1999
17,033
1
81
Originally posted by: Skoorb
There is no right or wrong answer. Merely what you prefer yourself. I've lived in England, Canada, and the US, and the only two places I'd like to live again are either the US where I am now or Canada in the future. I don't think I'd make a good fit for England, though it's my third pick (distantly). If I do end up staying long term in the US it's for the money and no other reason. Perhaps I'm a bit too materialistic, but there is more money in the US than in Canada, hence the reason I could see myself staying here for the long haul.

I have to agree with skoorb here. I worked in Canada for a few monthsand I found the wages lower and the taxes higher. Not mention it got damn cold :)
 

StinkyPinky

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2002
6,763
783
126
I'm a New Zealander and I adore my country. However, I also love the UK, Canada, US, and Australia. These five are probably the only countries I would seriously consider living in.

It's a biased "anglo-saxon" point of view I guess. However these countries are the most like home. Plus they speak English.
 

gopunk

Lifer
Jul 7, 2001
29,239
2
0
Originally posted by: zCypher
Originally posted by: LongCoolMother
id say some of the european countries, and canada, are better places to live. id say USA is best overall for working, getting an education. i dont think its the best place to live (high cost of living etc.) but its definately not bad.
It's only good for getting an education if you have a boatload of cash, which many people do not. Canada.. actually no, Quebec specifically is the best place to get an education, since tuition is government funded, and ANYBODY can get through college and university on their own.

As for other aspects, don't ask me.. :p

funny, i have gotten a very good education, am still getting one, and i do not have a boatload of cash.
 

Piano Man

Diamond Member
Feb 5, 2000
3,370
0
76
I actually think that Norway or Sweden would be the best place to live. However, the US isn't that far behind.
 

Skyclad1uhm1

Lifer
Aug 10, 2001
11,383
87
91
It's a matter of being used to the country you live in. Unless it's really messed up, or you just don't feel at home, you aren't likely to claim it is a bad place to live. My youngest sister lived in the USA for a year, but moved back to London where she had studied and worked before, as she felt more at home there.

Every country has its advantages and disadvantages. Over here you can't get millions from McDonalds by pooring coffee on your lap for example, but they are too soft on criminals.