Intel i7-9700 (non-K). Anyone have one?

Page 2 - Seeking answers? Join the AnandTech community: where nearly half-a-million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.

ehume

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2009
1,423
23
91
#26
Maybe even run without a io shield as well? Maybe not a recommended idea but i like where your going with your idea. My main desktop i can deal with some noise if i can't hear it through my headphones. If i manage to hear the noise then it becomes a problem. I usually run a household fan hitting me and my tower on the low option and it makes easily twice as much noise as my desktop and i can't really even hear that with my headphones. I can deal with what i may hear sometimes given i welcome the airflow my way and computers way. The fan only sits directly on top of a fan based vent for the air conditioning.

Are oem towers coming with 120mm fans exhaust fans now? I seen some of the gamer towers that do but like your run of the mill Dell? I got a friends i5 2500 /1050ti gaming rig in a old 2008 era Emachines case with a Antec 80mm exhaust and temps are very solid and the pc is very quiet . Ambient noise easily overlaps that pcs noise. It is a very nice sleeper pc with its Celeron sticker on the front too! I got a Corsair 400 c collecting dust which i may put her hardware into. I mentioned the upgrade and she kind of shrugged it off so idk what to say or do. Could maybe go crazy and make the ultimate sleeper out of that Emachines case. I couldn't get my Meshify c as quiet as that dang Emachines if i tried LOL. Outside of unplugging every last fan but rear perhaps and going back to the Noctua i had used before?

Yeah i usually overlook oem towers so i honestly haven't had a peak at the rear of a basic or lower end non gaming rig in some time. Everyone i know with a pc had their pc built by me. Most just get hand me down parts at a steal or free. :)
I don't think the IO shield rises into the airflow, so I think it makes no difference.

Since 2101 I have been removing the rear grill and the exhaust fan on steel cases or removing the exhaust fan on Lian Li cases see here)(https://www.overclock.net/forum/246-air-cooling/1594120-negative-pressure-rig-no-case-fans.html). I also remove PCIe slot covers. So far, I have left the IO shields in place.
 

UsandThem

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
11,091
685
136
#27
Since 2101 I have been removing the rear grill and the exhaust fan on steel cases or removing the exhaust fan on Lian Li cases see here)(https://www.overclock.net/forum/246-air-cooling/1594120-negative-pressure-rig-no-case-fans.html)
A lot of people don't realize how restrictive those rear exhaust grills are (and the turbulence of the air hitting it adds noise as well). I really wish more case manufacturers went back to this style instead of using the honeycomb style ones:

 

mopardude87

Senior member
Oct 22, 2018
495
145
76
#28
A lot of people don't realize how restrictive those rear exhaust grills are (and the turbulence of the air hitting it adds noise as well). I really wish more case manufacturers went back to this style instead of using the honeycomb style ones:

I did a mod on a case some years ago as i came to that conclusion as well and i used that exact kind of grill. :) It certainly did improve rear airflow. I lack a dremel tool to do that now. I even did that on the side panel of this case as well.
 

Batmeat

Senior member
Feb 1, 2011
689
7
91
#29
I have the 9700k purring at 4.9ghz all cores on Corsair water cooler. Haven’t tried any tweaking yet. If you want I’ll drop it back to stock and run benchmarks for you. What benchmarks would you like to see? I’m guessing the results will be similar to a 9700 non K.
 

ehume

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2009
1,423
23
91
#30
I did a mod on a case some years ago as i came to that conclusion as well and i used that exact kind of grill. :) It certainly did improve rear airflow. I lack a dremel tool to do that now. I even did that on the side panel of this case as well.
You don't need a Dremel. A pair of side-cutters will do. When you have cut off the "grill" you can tape the cut edges with Gorilla tape. The "finger protector" can be held on with fan screws which screw into #10 plastic nuts. You can get plastic nuts at an auto supply store. People use plastic nuts for license plates.
 

ehume

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2009
1,423
23
91
#31
I have the 9700k purring at 4.9ghz all cores on Corsair water cooler. Haven’t tried any tweaking yet. If you want I’ll drop it back to stock and run benchmarks for you. What benchmarks would you like to see? I’m guessing the results will be similar to a 9700 non K.
Cutting the OC on a 9700k is not an automatic equivalence to doing a 9700. They may have been binned differently, so your proposed testing will be needed to tell us if a reduced 9700k will come out the same as a 9700.
 

mopardude87

Senior member
Oct 22, 2018
495
145
76
#32
You don't need a Dremel. A pair of side-cutters will do. When you have cut off the "grill" you can tape the cut edges with Gorilla tape. The "finger protector" can be held on with fan screws which screw into #10 plastic nuts. You can get plastic nuts at an auto supply store. People use plastic nuts for license plates.
Yup i did it with side cutters last time but the job kind of looked half assed lol. I guess i shouldn't have cared given i did it to a Hp oem tower so i could run a 770 in it without issues. Put the 80mm rear one on and a side 120mm fan where ventilation was at. Had no issues keeping that card cool. For a moment before the 120mm i strapped a desktop fan where the 120mm ended up and honestly that cooled it down just as well. Was about as ghetto as water in place of milk when you cook kraft mac n cheese.

I guess as long as its just the rear i don't care how it will look. :) May do that again in the future. Just this meshify c mini looks so pretty compared to the usual trash i put my tower into.
 

ehume

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2009
1,423
23
91
#33
Yup i did it with side cutters last time but the job kind of looked half assed lol. I guess i shouldn't have cared given i did it to a Hp oem tower so i could run a 770 in it without issues. Put the 80mm rear one on and a side 120mm fan where ventilation was at. Had no issues keeping that card cool. For a moment before the 120mm i strapped a desktop fan where the 120mm ended up and honestly that cooled it down just as well. Was about as ghetto as water in place of milk when you cook kraft mac n cheese.

I guess as long as its just the rear i don't care how it will look. :) May do that again in the future. Just this meshify c mini looks so pretty compared to the usual trash i put my tower into.
It may look half-@$$ed now. Across the years I went from filing those edges (empty case until cleanup was finished) to cut pieces of report covers to Gorilla tape. Try the tape. I make everything look neat + you cab lift it without cutting yourself.
 
Jun 16, 2004
81
1
71
#34
Any numbers you can give for stock please? I have heard mixed numbers and claims of how a 9900k or this case perhaps even the 9900 non k could possibly require water or a top of the line air cooler at the very least.

The D15 is better than the majority of water coolers. It is a top of the line air cooler. I have a 9900k, at stock it sits under 70C
 
Last edited:

ehume

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2009
1,423
23
91
#36
The D15 is better than the majority of water coolers. It is a top of the line cooler. I have a 9900k, at stock it sits under 70C
You have chosen well, IMO. But in my testing, the D14 with modern fans does just as well, perhaps better. A D14 with a pair of NF-A14 iPPC 2000 did the best of all, beating a stock D15 by 1c (the review is here). Of course, variation in TIM emplacement could make a difference, but I did this for years, and I don't think the temps were off more than a degree.

The only reason I replied to your post was to show owners of the D14 an upgrade path.
 

ondma

Senior member
Mar 18, 2018
465
139
61
#37
It's not too bad if not overclocked, and not running synthetic benchmark utilities.

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-core-i9-9900k-9th-gen-cpu,5847-11.html

I really hope a site reviews these new non-K CPUs, and what Intel will do with their pricing if Ryzen2 turns out to be as good as the rumors are. I think a 9900 non-K could be a really good buy (for those who stay with Intel) if they dropped the price a little bit (and if it turned out to hang with its big brother).
When the 9900k came out, I said they needed a lower clocked, more "mainstream" model. I am happy to see that they are bringing back hyperthreading to at least one model besides the absolute top of the line (I mean in desktops of course, I know it is still active on mobile chips).
 
Jun 16, 2004
81
1
71
#39
You have chosen well, IMO. But in my testing, the D14 with modern fans does just as well, perhaps better. A D14 with a pair of NF-A14 iPPC 2000 did the best of all, beating a stock D15 by 1c (the review is here). Of course, variation in TIM emplacement could make a difference, but I did this for years, and I don't think the temps were off more than a degree.

The only reason I replied to your post was to show owners of the D14 an upgrade path.
You read wrong, the difference between the two at the top end is 0.1C. This is probably due to mounting or TIM application.

I use MX-4. A variation of 1C is within margin of error. I am using a single fan on the d15. I do however have good case airflow.

Please note I have had the D15 since release in 2015, it has been on a number of different chips and replaced a significantly more expensive custom water cooling system.

When stressed with a mild overclock (4.8 all cores, Avx divider 0) I hit about 75-76 at auto volts (1.256v).

My daily general speed is 1-7 cores active, 5.0ghz, 8 cores active 4.8ghz, avx divider = 0. I figure in general unless all cores are active it’s just a transient load. All sleep states and extensions (eg vt-d) are active.

To be honest, I haven’t bothered trying for higher, 200mhz at these speeds is a tiny %.. for potentially significantly more heat.
 
Last edited:

mopardude87

Senior member
Oct 22, 2018
495
145
76
#40
Not bad then, if the 9900 non k has lower bins i guess even a cooler that is slightly smaller and cheaper would even be sufficient. I am pretty comfortable with the upper 70s i load under stress conditions on my 212 on the 8700 non k. In all seriousness though if i was buying a 9900 non k i would just go for the NH-D15 . Would at least have better temps then now and less noise to boot. Would certainly make the upgrade from a 8700 non k that much more interesting.

Not that i would upgrade from a 8700 non k to a 9900 non k given i game at 4k. If anything anyone with less then a i5 8400 on a coffee lake set up has a excellent option. A fresh build i wouldn't bother with Ryzen 3000 series almost here. If a game pushed 16 threads and the 9900 offered performance as good as a 3800x perhaps getting $150-$200 for the 8700 and jumping on the 9900 would be a option for me. Could be years before i could even consider such a thing.
 
Jun 16, 2004
81
1
71
#41
One thing that Anandtech did was explain the TDP. Essentially, at stock, the 9900k puts out 95w after the short duration and long duration (10sec) power limits. This limits the clock with AVX to about 4.1 ghz.

For short bursts it is “allowed” to hit 210w (in reality it consumes more like 185w) provided it doesn’t hit thermal limits.

The d15 is more than capable of handling 95w, and transients much higher.

Gigabyte’s way of managing things was
to not respond directly to the processor’s demands for more power and to moderate it. The result is the chip runs cooler. (I have a gigabyte aorus z390 ultra).
 
Apr 27, 2000
12,690
1,516
126
#42
One thing that Anandtech did was explain the TDP. Essentially, at stock, the 9900k puts out 95w after the short duration and long duration (10sec) power limits. This limits the clock with AVX to about 4.1 ghz.

For short bursts it is “allowed” to hit 210w (in reality it consumes more like 185w) provided it doesn’t hit thermal limits.
Actually, what AnandTech found (after flailing about with a motherboard that insisted on defaulting to PL2) was that the chip would pull over 160W sustained running PoVRay:

https://www.anandtech.com/show/13400/intel-9th-gen-core-i9-9900k-i7-9700k-i5-9600k-review/21

The d15 is more than capable of handling 95w, and transients much higher.
It's good for somewhere in the ballpark of 150-160W of sustained thermal output without letting temps get too out-of-hand. Upgrading to more/better fans can improve that performance by a bit. Mine handles over 200W on an 1800x. Had to put some loud fans on there, though.
 

ehume

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2009
1,423
23
91
#43
Actually, what AnandTech found (after flailing about with a motherboard that insisted on defaulting to PL2) was that the chip would pull over 160W sustained running PoVRay:

https://www.anandtech.com/show/13400/intel-9th-gen-core-i9-9900k-i7-9700k-i5-9600k-review/21



It's good for somewhere in the ballpark of 150-160W of sustained thermal output without letting temps get too out-of-hand. Upgrading to more/better fans can improve that performance by a bit. Mine handles over 200W on an 1800x. Had to put some loud fans on there, though.
I agree about that D15 cooling capacity in normal use. But what kind of fans did you use to get it to handle 200W? I was able to get the D14 to exceed the D15 by a mere 0.5c, but I had to use NF-A14 iPPC 2000 fans to do it.
 
Apr 27, 2000
12,690
1,516
126
#44
I agree about that D15 cooling capacity in normal use. But what kind of fans did you use to get it to handle 200W? I was able to get the D14 to exceed the D15 by a mere 0.5c, but I had to use NF-A14 iPPC 2000 fans to do it.
NF-A14 iPPC 3000 fans (lulz). So loud.

Peak power draw on this 1800x has gone over 210W before (@ 4.0 GHz). Temps are . . . acceptable.
 
Jun 16, 2004
81
1
71
#45
Case air flow matters more than having enormous fans on the cooler itself. I have open air through to the front of the case where I have a Corsair ML120, and an SP120 (with filters) in line with the cooler.

Behind the cooler I have a noctua s12a exhaust.

I have them set to change speed based on VRM temperatures, and the cpu fan speed is based on the cpu temperature.

The result is a relatively quiet case.
 
Apr 27, 2000
12,690
1,516
126
#46
My case is a wind tunnel. It's a Rosewill Thor v2 with all the stock case fans @ 100%. Best setup I've had to date, I think.
 

ehume

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2009
1,423
23
91
#47
My case is a wind tunnel. It's a Rosewill Thor v2 with all the stock case fans @ 100%. Best setup I've had to date, I think.
One thing I discovered in 2010: you do not need case fans to produce a wind tunnel. This seems to replicate your own experience.

Since 2010 I have removed all "grills" from steel cases (usually just perforated steel walls; aluminum cases usually have no rear "grills") and lived without the additional fan and noise. I recommend it.
 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
18,165
2,112
136
#48
My case is a wind tunnel. It's a Rosewill Thor v2 with all the stock case fans @ 100%. Best setup I've had to date, I think.
What radiator options does that case have, it looks nice.
 


ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS