I got my Anova today!

Page 42 - Seeking answers? Join the AnandTech community: where nearly half-a-million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
42,270
106
126
That looks so effing nom nom.
They are legit incredible, I make them at least once a week. They don't require any weird ingredients or tools either, and preparation is mostly just a matter of time. A lot of bread recipes use a 2-rise system & this is no exception. In this case, you basically just stir everything together and let it rise for 4 or 5 hours in a bowl, then blob out the dough onto a cookie sheet and do the second rise in the fridge for 12 to 42 hours. Then throw on a medium-low skillet for 8 minutes per side. They keep for a week at room temp or a month in the fridge (they won't last that long tho, lol). I usually stir them together after work & then put them in the fridge for the second rise before bed, then cook them the next day. Be warned, you'll never want to go back to store-bought again...
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
42,270
106
126
For anyone here who's Sous Vide eggs. A few days ago I tried making some soft boiled. I followed the directions in my Anova app, they came out way more on the poached side, not bad at all just not what I wanted to make. So I Googled and found a bunch of recipes, most of them were pretty similar. I think I cooked them 150f for 45 minutes. I found the ChefStep recipe which was 167 for 13 minutes. The yolks might have been a little less runny, but the whites were still pretty poachy. When I get home I want to throw a couple in at a higher temp and see what works. Maybe someone here has done it and can give me magic number. I'd like an egg you can pick up and eat with your hand, but where the inside is still very runny. Both ways I made them they came out way too soft to pick up and eat,
Also check out ChefStep's Egg Calculator, it's an amazing piece of technology:

https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/the-egg-calculator

You simply (visually) choose the doneness of the egg white & then the egg yolk, and it spits out the time & temp. It's also worth reading the story below the calculator & looking through the associated links. There's a whole world of things to do with eggs out there!
Like Douglas Baldwin and César Vega, we spend a lot of our time thinking about how to account for the nonlinear way that heat behaves in the kitchen. In fact, we’re completely fascinated by the complexities of heat transfer and a little obsessed with finding ways to simplify them for everyday cooks. Our team of scientists, software engineers, designers, and chefs teamed up with Douglas to apply his intricate algorithms to a simple, user-friendly web app. We filmed hundreds of outcomes and implemented them in a visual interface for a two-step “calculator” (with three supplementary steps for fine-tuning), and voilà: the ChefSteps Egg Calculator was born. The app will adjust time and temperature depending on how you want your egg, and—talk about worry-free cooking—whether you want to serve it now or later.
 
Jul 12, 2006
92,887
1,207
136
It mostly boils down (haha) to experimentation to get it exactly where you like it. But once you nail it, make sure to write it down so that you can replicate it perfectly every single time! And you'll find really interesting things as you experiment & make discoveries & get in tune with your personal preferences...like, I really prefer hardboiling my eggs in the Instant Pot because for some magic, unknown reason, the pressure makes the shells come off a lot easier. Anyway, check out this Serious Eats article for a foundational primer:

https://www.seriouseats.com/2013/10/sous-vide-101-all-about-eggs.html

Lifehacker also has some interesting reading on it:

https://skillet.lifehacker.com/all-the-ways-to-sous-vide-eggs-ranked-1754844453

I really like to dig into the process behind getting exact results, because when I get in the mood for something, I want it to be GOOD, and with traditional cooking, unless you have the skill down pat, it can be hard to replicate that really good result every single time perfectly. I have made a lot of crummy cookies, eggs, etc. in my day lol.

I've been doing a lot of experiments with eggs between my OneTop (temperature-controlled induction cooktop), my Instant Pot, and my sous vide setup. Been doing a lot of Eggslut recipes lately (eggs brulee, the potato puree eggslut, the marbleized eggs with chives on brioche, etc.), plus been messing around with shortcut Eggs Benedict using various techniques & from-scratch recipes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSPgnoMBV4Q

https://www.seriouseats.com/2013/03/how-to-poach-eggs-easy-way-poached-breakfast-video.html

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2013/10/sous-vide-soft-poached-eggs.html

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2013/04/foolproof-2-minute-hollandaise-recipe.html

https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/04/how-to-make-easy-english-muffins.html

Anyway, yeah, eggs is an ongoing research project of sorts for me. Let us know how you make out with your softboiled project, and if you figure it out, post your time/temp & pics!
A few years ago, when I read Kenji's ~2-day protocol to make a perfect poached egg, I decided that this bullshit really wasn't worth any human's time. I love everything about Kenji and sous vide, but there are rational limits when it comes to ideas and methods that, in the end, are just preposterously stupid.

I'm not going to bother with 36+ hours of something when ~15 minutes can get me 95% there.
 
Jul 12, 2006
92,887
1,207
136
They are legit incredible, I make them at least once a week. They don't require any weird ingredients or tools either, and preparation is mostly just a matter of time. A lot of bread recipes use a 2-rise system & this is no exception. In this case, you basically just stir everything together and let it rise for 4 or 5 hours in a bowl, then blob out the dough onto a cookie sheet and do the second rise in the fridge for 12 to 42 hours. Then throw on a medium-low skillet for 8 minutes per side. They keep for a week at room temp or a month in the fridge (they won't last that long tho, lol). I usually stir them together after work & then put them in the fridge for the second rise before bed, then cook them the next day. Be warned, you'll never want to go back to store-bought again...
Oh my god. Reading this made me want to stab everything in front of me and set fire to an Orphanage.

This is your fault!
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
42,270
106
126
A few years ago, when I read Kenji's ~2-day protocol to make a perfect poached egg, I decided that this bull really wasn't worth any human's time. I love everything about Kenji and sous vide, but there are rational limits when it comes to ideas and methods that, in the end, are just preposterously stupid.

I'm not going to bother with 36+ hours of something when ~15 minutes can get me 95% there.
Do you have a link to that article? The only one I remember mentioning 2 days was his pre-SV method, where you swirl the egg in hot water for 4 minutes & then can keep it stored in the fridge for up to 2 days, so you can eat it the next day or the day after simply by reheating in a bowl of hot water for a couple minutes:

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2014/04/foolproof-poached-eggs-food-lab-recipe.html

I do agree with the Law of Diminishing Returns though - if you can get mostly there with significantly less work, then that's a good & valid path as well as the original process. If you've seen the first link (the Bon Appetit video), they actually take that approach & use stuff like thin-sliced ham slices instead of a thicker piece of Canadian bacon.
 

bradly1101

Diamond Member
May 5, 2013
4,684
1
126
That looks amazing. I remember a documentary about food advertising 'stylists.' They were quite skillful with eye trickery.

This looks like something I'd get at a very nice restaurant.

The sous vide injects flavor, and I don't know if I've ever had food cooked that way. I kind of like chicken and fish to stand on their own with a reduction on top. (OJ, apple cider vin., dijon, a bit of butter, and some branded ingredients if you have that store nearby or want them online. Maybe good flavors for sous vide. I'd have to PM)
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
42,270
106
126
Reading this made me want to stab everything in front of me and set fire to an Orphanage.

This is your fault!
If you're referring to the multiple steps over time, then allow me to provide a key (imo) learning experience for you here: (srs)

I grew up with very basic food. We used salt, pepper, and Mrs. Dash. Lots of casseroles, lots of dry chicken. My family was not a group of foodies. I never really learned how to cook all that much growing up - just a few items here & there. I eventually became a very reactive cook - if I was in the mood to make, say, cookies, I'd furiously whip up a batch of cookie dough, cook all of them, and chow down until I was stuffed. Same with Kraft Mac & Cheese, pancakes, etc. I didn't cook at home consistently & thought you being a great cook was one of those things where you either had it or you didn't. I had no idea how to make great food at home, especially not on a regular basis. As it turns out, nearly every recipe out there boils down to simply following, literally, a step-by-step instructional checklist. You can take all of the work out of it by using stuff like Pinterest & Youtube to find top-notch recipes, so that you can get amazing results while only having to follow the directions. That was a pretty big revelation for me - cooking & baking incredible meals were no longer a barrier out of my reach!

But I still persisted with being a sporadically reactive cook until I got into H&F and started getting into meal prep. Lots of the same meals, but at least I was being more proactive, which had a domino effect - I didn't have to cook every day, I spent waaaaay less money eating out, I ate better-quality & healthier, more natural foods, I lost a bunch of weight, I felt better, and I had a lot more energy throughout the day. But I got sick of eating the same thing all the time, and creating a rotating menu is a surprisingly difficult task to put into practice. Getting into appliance-based cooking, particularly with the Instant Pot, sous vide, and no-knead bread recipes, helped me to create small-batch "gourmet" meals (gourmet here meaning they actually tasted good & I looked forward to eating them, instead of the usual plain chicken & broccoli bowl) & got me started with doing small batches of different food so that I could build up my freezer storage & rotate meals so I didn't get sick of them. Which was huge, because otherwise I tended to just go out to eat instead.

I eventually discovered a few tricks, as well as a key behavior: using snippets of time to create value. Aside from being a reactive cook, I was also very mode-oriented, i.e., if I was in "cooking mode", I could easily spend an hour or two cooking up a big meal for the night with a main dish, sides, dinner rolls, and dessert. The problem was, I was unable to sustain that every night, and would end up eating leftovers the next night, or cereal, or getting take-out. As I learned more about my kitchen workflow, I started to recognize that there were a lot of small, quick things I could do to create solid output with minimal exertion. Call it lazy cooking or call it efficient cooking, but it worked really well. It all started with no-knead bread...pour four ingredients into a big bowl, literally mix with your fingers for 30 seconds, cover with plastic wrap, and let it sit in a corner until you got home from work the next day. Then punch down the air bubbles, roll it into a ball, and let it rise for another 2 hours, then bake for 45 minutes. Voila, a beautiful, delicious bread boule!

The key, in this particular recipe, was using small slivers of time. Each step only took a minute or so, so it wasn't like there was a huge time investment required, day after day after day. And that's something else I kept running into - I needed dinner for tomorrow. And dinner for the next day. And dinner for the day after that. I mean, I love to cook, but I get home late a lot of days & my brain is shot & I just want to eat and not have to do any work, and eating fast-food all the time was not good on my wallet nor my waistline. So that's when I started putting together some meal planning stuff in order to do the bare-minimum required to get great meals at home every day. And that actual hands-on time vs. letting time do the work for you thing, whether it's with no-knead bread or sous-vide or whatever, is really important because there's a mental barrier I run into, especially when I get tired, where I don't even want to think about all of the work required to cook - BUT, I can handle doing a quick minute or so of prep as needed. So in the case of the English muffins, it can be hard to visualize, but here's really how it goes:

1. First day: Get home from work, stir the ingredients together in a bowl, let sit.

2. First day: 4 or 5 hours later, before going to bed, scoop out a dozen dough blobs onto a baking sheet, cover in plastic wrap, and put it in the fridge.

3. Second day: After work, spend 20 minutes cooking all of the English muffins up. Then you have a batch that is good for a week at room temp (or a month in the fridge).

So as far as actual work & effort goes:

1. A minute or two to stir the ingredients together, after work.

2. A minute or two to blog out the dough onto a sheet and stick it into the fridge, before bed.

3. 20 minutes to cook them all up on the stovetop, the next day after work.

Now you have a dozen (amazing) English muffins that are good for up to a month if you store them in the fridge. They taste way better than store-bought, are super cheap to make, and don't have any weird ingredients because you made them from scratch. Now, if you don't really care about any of those things, then why bother, but if you do like really really good food but don't want to have to put in a huge time investment, then you can use little pockets of time to spread out the work, because you're going to need breakfast tomorrow, and the next day, and in a week, and in a month, so it helps to figure out some little tricks like this to keep the workflow going so that you can keep providing food for yourself without necessarily need to spend an hour or two in the kitchen every single day. Which is also one of the big reasons I like sous vide - you can vac-seal & freeze your meats & veggies ahead of time & just pick them out and let the machine do the work for you, and you get consistently awesome results with it!

I don't mean to come off as overbearing or anything, it's just that I've come to appreciate the value of spreading out kitchen work over time & doing some minor planning-ahead in order to get top-notch results on a regular basis, instead of getting in a bingo situation & being forced to go through a drive-thru or visiting a vending machine to get sustenance. Which is fine sometimes, but it was becoming a bad habit for me & I couldn't really figure out how to overcome it for the longest time, at least not without eating the dreaded "homemade food" stuff, which in my worldview at the time was definitely not something I looked forward to, haha.
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
42,270
106
126
The sous vide injects flavor, and I don't know if I've ever had food cooked that way. I kind of like chicken and fish to stand on their own with a reduction on top. (OJ, apple cider vin., dijon, a bit of butter, and some branded ingredients if you have that store nearby or want them online. Maybe good flavors for sous vide. I'd have to PM)
So it's actually quite the opposite, believe it or not - sous vide does NOT inject flavor. There's been quite a bit of work done to examine this in more detail; the short version is, just cook the meat (or veggies or fruit) in the bag & then season & sauce afterward. Just like you said - let the meat stand on its own & then do what you want with it after that, whether it's a rub or a sear (pre-sear is OK) or a sauce or a marinade or a smoke finish or whatever. This is because sous vide doesn't cause penetration; only salt does. As Meathead puts it, marinades are a surface treatment:

https://amazingribs.com/tested-reci...yths-marinades-brinerades-and-how-gashing-can

More information:

http://www.genuineideas.com/ArticlesIndex/dye.html

Deeper discussion here:

https://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/54559/how-does-rub-or-marinade-actually-seep-into-meat

And here:

https://cooking.stackexchange.com/q...will-the-flavors-in-a-brine-penetrate-chicken

That's not to say that you can't add stuff to the bag; I usually put a knob of butter, salt, and pepper in my veggie bags, but that's so that I can cut them open & do a quick pan-fry to reduce the sauce down to a glaze to serve hot. So really, the focus of sous vide, in the case of meat, is to create a particular tenderness & repeatable results that is very difficult to get consistently with any other cooking process. On one hand, it's basically cooking for dummies (yay!), and on the other hand, it's a VERY high-end cooking method that delivers excellent results time after time, after you've narrowed down exactly what results you like for a specific cut of meat or veggie or whatever. Plus you can do other neat things with it as well (temper chocolate, make creme brulee, Starbucks egg bites, yogurt, incredible fried chicken by sous-viding the chicken first, French fries by doing the initial brine via sous vide, bring out the flavors in vegetables like carrots, etc.).

So that's something worth knowing - sous vide is for straight-up meat; it's like the foundation of a house, something that you build up from as much as you want. Like with steak, you can sous-vide it, sear it with some salt & pepper, and boom, have an amazing steak. Or you can take it to the next level by sous-viding it, then doing a peppercorn crust & finishing it with a mustard-cream sauce:

https://www.seriouseats.com/2018/01/how-to-make-steak-au-poivre.html

If you want to have even more fun with it, you can setup some French fries as well:

https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/thin-cut-french-fries

Here's another method for you @zinfamous - make-ahead sous-vide French fries!

1. Sous-vide the fries in brine for 15 minutes at 194F

2. Let cool & dry, and then deep-fry the fries at 266F for 5 minutes

3. Let cool & dry, freeze, and then vac-seal the fries. Now you have amazing fry packs that will last for months!

4. When ready to eat, deep-fry at 374F for about 1 minute and 45 seconds & then season with salt & pepper

So you can basically make super delicious fries ahead of time using sous-vide & an initial deep-fry, and then just drop them in the deep-fryer again from the freezer for a second go-around whenever you're ready to eat them!
 

bradly1101

Diamond Member
May 5, 2013
4,684
1
126
So it's actually quite the opposite, believe it or not - sous vide does NOT inject flavor. There's been quite a bit of work done to examine this in more detail; the short version is, just cook the meat (or veggies or fruit) in the bag & then season & sauce afterward. Just like you said - let the meat stand on its own & then do what you want with it after that, whether it's a rub or a sear (pre-sear is OK) or a sauce or a marinade or a smoke finish or whatever. This is because sous vide doesn't cause penetration; only salt does. As Meathead puts it, marinades are a surface treatment:

https://amazingribs.com/tested-reci...yths-marinades-brinerades-and-how-gashing-can

More information:

http://www.genuineideas.com/ArticlesIndex/dye.html

Deeper discussion here:

https://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/54559/how-does-rub-or-marinade-actually-seep-into-meat

And here:

https://cooking.stackexchange.com/q...will-the-flavors-in-a-brine-penetrate-chicken

That's not to say that you can't add stuff to the bag; I usually put a knob of butter, salt, and pepper in my veggie bags, but that's so that I can cut them open & do a quick pan-fry to reduce the sauce down to a glaze to serve hot. So really, the focus of sous vide, in the case of meat, is to create a particular tenderness & repeatable results that is very difficult to get consistently with any other cooking process. On one hand, it's basically cooking for dummies (yay!), and on the other hand, it's a VERY high-end cooking method that delivers excellent results time after time, after you've narrowed down exactly what results you like for a specific cut of meat or veggie or whatever. Plus you can do other neat things with it as well (temper chocolate, make creme brulee, Starbucks egg bites, yogurt, incredible fried chicken by sous-viding the chicken first, French fries by doing the initial brine via sous vide, bring out the flavors in vegetables like carrots, etc.).

So that's something worth knowing - sous vide is for straight-up meat; it's like the foundation of a house, something that you build up from as much as you want. Like with steak, you can sous-vide it, sear it with some salt & pepper, and boom, have an amazing steak. Or you can take it to the next level by sous-viding it, then doing a peppercorn crust & finishing it with a mustard-cream sauce:

https://www.seriouseats.com/2018/01/how-to-make-steak-au-poivre.html

If you want to have even more fun with it, you can setup some French fries as well:

https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/thin-cut-french-fries

Here's another method for you @zinfamous - make-ahead sous-vide French fries!

1. Sous-vide the fries in brine for 15 minutes at 194F

2. Let cool & dry, and then deep-fry the fries at 266F for 5 minutes

3. Let cool & dry, freeze, and then vac-seal the fries. Now you have amazing fry packs that will last for months!

4. When ready to eat, deep-fry at 374F for about 1 minute and 45 seconds & then season with salt & pepper

So you can basically make super delicious fries ahead of time using sous-vide & an initial deep-fry, and then just drop them in the deep-fryer again from the freezer for a second go-around whenever you're ready to eat them!
Hmm. I've only seen their use on cooking shows like Chopped. It's been a while and I thought I remember herbs (rosemary sprigs...) or flavored liquids and I don't remember what else.

I always thought the vacuum and the low heat did something like that. I'm a noob to food preparation technology. I've cooked for two before but I've never even used a food processor.
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
42,270
106
126
Hmm. I've only seen their use on cooking shows like Chopped. It's been a while and I thought I remember herbs (rosemary sprigs...) or flavored liquids and I don't remember what else.

I always thought the vacuum and the low heat did something like that. I'm a noob to food preparation technology. I've cooked for two before but I've never even used a food processor.
There's a lot of misconceptions about cooking sous vide; putting stuff in the bag (other than just the meat) is one of them (i.e. don't). Stuff like rosemary tends to flavor the bag more than the meat. It's not that you can't do it, it's just that it's another surface treatment & is generally better to do after cooking sous vide; like if you're searing it in butter, that's when you'd throw the aromatics in. The only real "gotcha" to avoid is doing garlic sous vide, because death:

http://sousvideresources.com/2016/07/23/fresh-garlic-in-sous-vide/

Anyway, this is the most up-to-date sous-vide workflow I'm aware of: (for meat)

1. Sous-vide with nothing in the bag.

2. Remove from water and shock in an ice water bath. Sous vide doesn't have carryover cooking, so that's not a big deal, but if you cook a steak to say medium via sous vide & then sear it, then you'll be serving a medium-well steak because of the temperature addition. So basically if you sear it right away, you risk elevating the temperature beyond the intended target. Alternatively, if you're eating it right away, you can just let it sit out at room temp for a few minutes instead of using an ice bath, which is usually what I do - that way you get a buffer zone to play with. Shocking is also good if you plan on searing the food later for serving because it helps to quickly bring the temperature down, so that the food doesn't stay in the danger zone for too long.

3. Season

4. Sear

There's also the question of cooking vs. pasteurizing. A lot of us eat rare, medium-rare, and medium-cooked meat, so you can get away with less time in the sous-vide bath, which doesn't fully pasteurize the meat. Although sometimes the finishing process can help with that. Like with wings, 4 hours at 140F will fully pasteurize the meat, but a lot of recipes only call for 45 minutes, but then you do a quick one or two minute deep-fry at 375F in oil at the end.

All of this may sound really complex, but it's really not. Once you learn the basics & do a few cooks, it's the most dirt-simply way of cooking I've ever come across, short of making a bowl of cereal. And the food comes out exactly the same every time, so you get consistency, and when you couple that with high-quality results, that means you can eat restaurant-quality food at home on a regular basis using a very easy cooking process. I'm able to have stuff like steak & shrimp every week for the same cost as a Whopper meal at BK, no joke. Cheap sous-vide machines have really democratized the process, both from a cost perspective & from a quality perspective. You don't need uber culinary skills to get great results anymore, which is particularly nice because if cooking is not a passion or hobby of yours, but you still want to eat great-tasting, healthy food at home, you can use sous-vide to do it.

On the flip side, if you DO like cooking, you can do some amazing things with it, like Hayabusa Rider does. I started researching sous vide after reading the OP's post back in December 2013 & currently use it on pretty much a daily basis. It takes a lot of the hassle out of meal preparation & kind of shifts it over to more "meal assembly" than actually having to cook (as it put in a lot of time & work). You just let the machine do its thing & then finish it up, haha.
 

bradly1101

Diamond Member
May 5, 2013
4,684
1
126
There's a lot of misconceptions about cooking sous vide; putting stuff in the bag (other than just the meat) is one of them (i.e. don't). Stuff like rosemary tends to flavor the bag more than the meat. It's not that you can't do it, it's just that it's another surface treatment & is generally better to do after cooking sous vide; like if you're searing it in butter, that's when you'd throw the aromatics in. The only real "gotcha" to avoid is doing garlic sous vide, because death:

http://sousvideresources.com/2016/07/23/fresh-garlic-in-sous-vide/

Anyway, this is the most up-to-date sous-vide workflow I'm aware of: (for meat)

1. Sous-vide with nothing in the bag.

2. Remove from water and shock in an ice water bath. Sous vide doesn't have carryover cooking, so that's not a big deal, but if you cook a steak to say medium via sous vide & then sear it, then you'll be serving a medium-well steak because of the temperature addition. So basically if you sear it right away, you risk elevating the temperature beyond the intended target. Alternatively, if you're eating it right away, you can just let it sit out at room temp for a few minutes instead of using an ice bath, which is usually what I do - that way you get a buffer zone to play with. Shocking is also good if you plan on searing the food later for serving because it helps to quickly bring the temperature down, so that the food doesn't stay in the danger zone for too long.

3. Season

4. Sear

There's also the question of cooking vs. pasteurizing. A lot of us eat rare, medium-rare, and medium-cooked meat, so you can get away with less time in the sous-vide bath, which doesn't fully pasteurize the meat. Although sometimes the finishing process can help with that. Like with wings, 4 hours at 140F will fully pasteurize the meat, but a lot of recipes only call for 45 minutes, but then you do a quick one or two minute deep-fry at 375F in oil at the end.

All of this may sound really complex, but it's really not. Once you learn the basics & do a few cooks, it's the most dirt-simply way of cooking I've ever come across, short of making a bowl of cereal. And the food comes out exactly the same every time, so you get consistency, and when you couple that with high-quality results, that means you can eat restaurant-quality food at home on a regular basis using a very easy cooking process. I'm able to have stuff like steak & shrimp every week for the same cost as a Whopper meal at BK, no joke. Cheap sous-vide machines have really democratized the process, both from a cost perspective & from a quality perspective. You don't need uber culinary skills to get great results anymore, which is particularly nice because if cooking is not a passion or hobby of yours, but you still want to eat great-tasting, healthy food at home, you can use sous-vide to do it.

On the flip side, if you DO like cooking, you can do some amazing things with it, like Hayabusa Rider does. I started researching sous vide after reading the OP's post back in December 2013 & currently use it on pretty much a daily basis. It takes a lot of the hassle out of meal preparation & kind of shifts it over to more "meal assembly" than actually having to cook (as it put in a lot of time & work). You just let the machine do its thing & then finish it up, haha.
So garlic sous vide is sousicide.

I like the aspect of not overcooking meats. I'm lazy and old. My doc. says I should avoid salt at my age (so does all other research I've seen regarding the average American's salt intake). I sprinkle a little salt-free seasoning mix on my skinless chicken breasts before baking and of course the ends of the breast are a bit dry when the thick part comes to temp.

Juicy all over would be good.

 
Sep 2, 2000
14,678
0
81
I still salt & pepper my steaks before putting them in the bag, then re-season (though less) as patting them dry usually removes most of my prior application I've found.
 
Jul 12, 2006
92,887
1,207
136
Got this in my email today:

Hello Nano Nerds!


We’ve been working hard here at Anova HQ to deliver the Nano to you by May and we're on track to do so.


We're anticipating that we'll release Multicook functionality in October. We know this is a much desired and sought after feature by all of the food nerd family, so we wanted to make sure you had the opportunity to exchange or receive a full refund for your Nano before it ships in the next months.

Please fill out this form here if you’d like to change your order, and we’ll be happy to take care of you.


As the Nano will begin shipping shortly and we’re firming up the shipping information for all of our customers, please understand that we will only be taking change order requests on the Nano until April 1st.


Thank you!
So, already delayed by ~8 months, now less-than-advertised functionality, 2nd offer to cancel is dispensed late on a holiday weekend, giving ~50 hours to respond, over said Holiday weekend. Shady af, no?
 
Nov 27, 2005
13,585
3
91
seems like it, and they're trying to pass it off as "because we're shipping soon"
 
Jul 12, 2006
92,887
1,207
136
seems like it, and they're trying to pass it off as "because we're shipping soon"
It seems to be one of the major updates for this one, other than the 1/10th degree precision (which honestly, is the really cool part) and the diminutive size. I'm not sure if it's enough for me to cancel, because I'm not sure if I will ever use that, but it does seem very useful to me, the multicook and sync. ...Never did see any details if it would be IOS only...which wouldn't matter to me, I guess, because I will never have an Apple device.
 

MaxDepth

Diamond Member
Jun 12, 2001
8,759
5
91
This is moot when you start having kids.

Yeah, I'll let you handle it when a three year old either: a) demands the food now (not some bullshit taking two days to prepare) or, b) lets you take a week to make something and then promptly pushes it off the table and on to the floor where the dog makes a mad dash and gobbles it up.

And that's just a Monday. You've got another six days left in that week, another three weeks in the month, another 11 months for the year. And then they're four. And whatever they liked to eat at age three, yeah good luck thinking that'll be the same at then next age.
 
Jul 12, 2006
92,887
1,207
136
This is moot when you start having kids.

Yeah, I'll let you handle it when a three year old either: a) demands the food now (not some bullshit taking two days to prepare) or, b) lets you take a week to make something and then promptly pushes it off the table and on to the floor where the dog makes a mad dash and gobbles it up.

And that's just a Monday. You've got another six days left in that week, another three weeks in the month, another 11 months for the year. And then they're four. And whatever they liked to eat at age three, yeah good luck thinking that'll be the same at then next age.
actually, this is really good for food demanded now!, because if you know what the kids generally like (as they do for a couple of years, anyway), you can effectively plan ahead a week's worth of food and get it almost-ready on Sunday. Just get them to proper doneness, all at once, and toss in fridge ready for the following whatever day to be finished on demand.

Technically, you could have your perfect pork chops, or steaks, or chicken whatever, or veggies ready to go within 10 minutes, every night.
 
Nov 27, 2005
13,585
3
91
It seems to be one of the major updates for this one, other than the 1/10th degree precision (which honestly, is the really cool part) and the diminutive size. I'm not sure if it's enough for me to cancel, because I'm not sure if I will ever use that, but it does seem very useful to me, the multicook and sync. ...Never did see any details if it would be IOS only...which wouldn't matter to me, I guess, because I will never have an Apple device.
was it much of a discount for preordering? After crazy delays with the nomiku kickstarter I've vowed never to do that again. Just not worth it
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
42,270
106
126
So, already delayed by ~8 months, now less-than-advertised functionality, 2nd offer to cancel is dispensed late on a holiday weekend, giving ~50 hours to respond, over said Holiday weekend. Shady af, no?
Bummer...what features got dropped?
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
42,270
106
126
actually, this is really good for food demanded now!, because if you know what the kids generally like (as they do for a couple of years, anyway), you can effectively plan ahead a week's worth of food and get it almost-ready on Sunday. Just get them to proper doneness, all at once, and toss in fridge ready for the following whatever day to be finished on demand.

Technically, you could have your perfect pork chops, or steaks, or chicken whatever, or veggies ready to go within 10 minutes, every night.
Yeah, I've been messing around with that technique lately for meals for my extended family - still working out all of the details (sear to reheat, reheat via boiling water, etc.), but it's a very convenient approach to meal prep!

I'm currently running dual Mellows (chillers) for daily dinners...I've been on the road a lot for the past six months & have been eating out waaaaaay too much, especially because what time I get back home changes on a daily basis. It's so nice to have a home-cooked meal that I can just "assemble" rather than having to, you know, actually cook, haha. Not to mention how much money it saves...an $18 meal at Olive Garden costs about $3 at home.
 

Kaido

Elite Member & Kitchen Overlord
Feb 14, 2004
42,270
106
126
The Mellow sous vide is on sale for $150 shipped using coupon code "50FORFRIENDS". This is the one with the chiller built-in. It lacks a large capacity like the Anova can do, but is fine for smaller cooking jobs (maybe a max of 4 big steaks). The coupon seems to work for anyone, just got my neighbor setup with an order! That's as cheap as the Anova used to be, but comes with a chiller & tank. Pretty nice deal!

https://www.cookmellow.com

I've been running a dual-Mellow setup for about a month now & have been using it for the majority of my weekly family dinners. Anything big (like pork shoulder) I do in the Anova (due to the size), but for your every day sous vide burgers, steaks, chicken, pork chops, etc. plus various veggies, this has been a great setup. I buy in bulk, vac-seal everything, and stick it in the deep freezer. I haven't quite found a way to prevent everything from sliding around on the freezer racks, so I'm using some cheap plastic bins for right now. I need some kind of silicone webbing or something to maximize capacity & airflow. Not a comprehensive list, but here's what's currently on rotation for my freezer-based SV system:

Protein:
  1. NY strip steak
  2. 6oz 80/20 burgers (flash-frozen before vac-sealing to hold shape)
  3. Boneless, skinless chicken breast (used in various ways, most recently for cloning the Shake Shack chicken sandwich)
  4. Chicken wings (either Korean-style with cornstarch/baking powder or just done regular)
  5. Chicken drumsticks (for deep-frying in a buttermilk batter)
  6. Chicken thighs (been experimenting with doing crispy skin separately from the SV process)
  7. Shrimp (good cold with cocktail sauce, fried up in a sauce like garlic-butter, or deep-fried in tempura)
  8. Pork chops
Veggies:
  1. Full-size carrots (skinned)
  2. Baby carrots
  3. Baby potatoes
  4. Fondant potatoes
I do a lot of frozen veggies in the Instant Pot right now, still exploring specific advantages for doing veggies sous-vide. Carrots do come out awesome, and potatoes are super convenient for certain methods. Like with baby potatoes, I can smash them & quick-sear them with say Parmesan & butter and still have them be fully cooked but ready in minutes thanks to the SV process. For other stuff like corn on the cob, I still prefer the IP.

 
Jul 12, 2006
92,887
1,207
136
Bummer...what features got dropped?
ah, missed this. They dropped the app-based "multi-cook" functionality, which they say will now be available on ~October release models. I understood this to mean it can't be updated with firmware or anything like that, because the offer was again to cancel your order or replace with earlier model if you want the full functionality.

I'm not sure if that feature matters much for me--it essentially allows you to pre-program multiple cook temperatures and times in one program, for it work remotely. All I ever do is cook everything that's in the pot at one temperature at a time, and you need to be there anyway if you are moving from veggies to meat, lowering temp, in the same pot
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY