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Home networking options

ckfalls

Junior Member
May 9, 2017
5
0
1
Hey all, question-loaded post here from a novice about home networking options. Did some homework but want to see what this forum thinks.

Seems if I want to extend wifi coverage in my new home I have 3 options: cat 6-run ap's, powerline extension, wifi mesh system.

1. Of the three, it seems cat 6 run ap's would give me best signal with least drop-off, does this sound right?

2. If I did the ap route, I'd want to do ceiling-mount poe ap's with no local power needs. If I did ap's (looking at TP-AC1200), would I need a wireless router in between modem and ap's, or could I simply do my horizontal runs from modem to ap with an inline poe injector (or, modem > switch with multiple poe ports > ap's)?

3. Is there any value to going the powerline or wifi mesh system (i.e. google wifi, Netgear Orbi, etc.) route instead of the system described above? Obviously I wouldn't have to run cat 6 all over my house and worry about back boxes and drywall cutting, but anything else I may be missing? I've read signal strength seems to be better in powerline systems which have the stations act as wifi hotspots, as well as providing another local cat6 drop, and that the mesh systems' signal degrade. Any thoughts on this?

For some context, this exercise is for home network setup on Comcast using a 200d/50u connection. Also looking to buy the modem not rent, have heard Arris Surfboard line is fairly capable.

Would love to hear some expert thoughts, thanks in advance!
 
Last edited:

razel

Platinum Member
May 14, 2002
2,337
89
101
#3. I differ. You will want Ethernet cables throughout your house. The Internet is not going away. In fact the wires (pipes) that carry your Internet need to be larger and wired Ethernet is the way to go. The future is optical, but boxes at the ends aren't cheap yet.

In fact, it's my summer project in 2 homes for my family. Properly run Ethernet cables though the attic and walls or crawlspace below.
 

ckfalls

Junior Member
May 9, 2017
5
0
1
Thanks guys, yep seems like running cable is still the way to go.

Yeah heard good things about the Unifi'd, but to get dual band, ac and Poe seems much more expensive than the TP-AC1200 I found. Any reason you like unifi over others?

Also, any thoughts on needing wireless router in between modem and ap' or can I go straight from modem (and Poe switch) to ap's? I can always do more digging on this but just curious if it's possible.
 

mnewsham

Lifer
Oct 2, 2010
14,480
398
136
The ubiquiti APs tend to be prosumer or small/medium business oriented. They aren't enterprise class, but they get close.

If you want to be able to easily handle 20+ wifi devices with packet shaping and similar, they're fantastic.

Simply put, they're more expensive because they offer more features. But they're still dirt cheap when compared to true enterprise APs.
 

ckfalls

Junior Member
May 9, 2017
5
0
1
That's fair, but I'm looking to add maybe three tops to my home setup. Still worth it for a simple DAS or does that TP model get me close at a better budget?
 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,063
494
126
Thanks guys, yep seems like running cable is still the way to go.

Yeah heard good things about the Unifi'd, but to get dual band, ac and Poe seems much more expensive than the TP-AC1200 I found. Any reason you like unifi over others?

Also, any thoughts on needing wireless router in between modem and ap' or can I go straight from modem (and Poe switch) to ap's? I can always do more digging on this but just curious if it's possible.
Cost in a home setting. That TP-AC1200 isnt POE? That means you have to run power to each AP location. Unifi is easily managed as well. You will need a router in-between the modem and the APs. Unless the modem you have is also a router. Comcast ships their modems as routers. If you want a cheap but highly capable POE switch. I have a pair of these in my house.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01JSNTWTO/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,063
494
126
The ubiquiti APs tend to be prosumer or small/medium business oriented. They aren't enterprise class, but they get close.

If you want to be able to easily handle 20+ wifi devices with packet shaping and similar, they're fantastic.

Simply put, they're more expensive because they offer more features. But they're still dirt cheap when compared to true enterprise APs.
Correct, the next step up would be something like Meraki. Where quality Wave 2 with MIMO cost 550+ for a single AP ;)
 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,063
494
126
Thanks! So it looks like it's poe:

TP-Link AC1200 Wireless Wi-Fi Access Point - Supports 802.3AF PoE, Dual Band, 802.11AC, Ceiling Mount, 2x2 MIMO Technology (EAP225) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01LLAK1UG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_1eIezb2H0YJMQ

Ok need the router. Yeah looking to get my own modem, no rental fee. I've heard better to get standalone wifi router for flexibility so seems I'll go that route and ap off of that.
Ha funny. When I looked that model up before it gave me this.

https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-Gigabit-Wireless-Archer-C1200/dp/B01IUDUJE0/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1494369129&sr=1-1&keywords=TP+1200

That AP you linked will work fine in your house.
 
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