Haswell Celerons officially launched.

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JoeRambo

Senior member
Jun 13, 2013
642
43
136
#26
Honest opinion, this Celeron is an insult to the Ivy Bridge based Celerons. If you really can't spend more, then save an additional 15€ and stay with s1155 Celerons and Mainboards.

Umm, i am not sure about that. Haswell celly G1820 is GREAT chip for ~40$ and there are some cheapo H81 mobos now, that go along it.

Keyword is graphics: Haswell Gen graphics is better than ivy bridge and that is enough to not look back.

What is sad value, is Haswell Pentiums, G3430 is twice the price, and in cheapo platform relevant features you get 1MB extra of L3 ( nice, but very workload specific) and 600mhz extra clock (~22% more). Graphics (key in those builds) is the same. So ~25% extra performance, for twice the price?

Intel could really sweaten the deal on Pentiums, by throwing in AVX2, Celerons are fine as is.
 

escrow4

Diamond Member
Feb 4, 2013
3,326
10
106
#27
On the contrary, these chips are rubbish. The last G1610 I had hit 100% loaded up with 1080p youtube vids, multitasking with a couple of programs and explorer windows felt physically slower (sluggish) than an i3/i5, even with an SSD and even though the system was dirt cheap it was crap to be honest. If its all you can afford, by all means, have at it but otherwise buy an i5 at least. You'll have a chip that can do anything and can actually last.
 

Piroko

Senior member
Jan 10, 2013
905
0
91
#28
Keyword is graphics: Haswell Gen graphics is better than ivy bridge and that is enough to not look back.
While technically true I don't see much hope at the performance level we're talking. Flash games will work fine, 3d games will be hit or miss - with the majority being a miss. The chance for one being a good user experience and the other one failing at the same tasks (over the course of total ownership) is ridiculously low imho.
 
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JoeRambo

Senior member
Jun 13, 2013
642
43
136
#29
On the contrary, these chips are rubbish. The last G1610 I had hit 100% loaded up with 1080p youtube vids, multitasking with a couple of programs and explorer windows felt physically slower (sluggish) than an i3/i5, even with an SSD and even though the system was dirt cheap it was crap to be honest. If its all you can afford, by all means, have at it but otherwise buy an i5 at least. You'll have a chip that can do anything and can actually last.
You are 100% right, but stating that i3/i5 would be better is kinda obvious.

Still there is quite a niche for those chips, and for the price they perform great. Troubles with 1080P is exactly what Haswell better GPU can solve, you simply get more perf out of same 10 EUs GPUs they have. I am not sure if anyone is expected to do more than office+youtube on these machines...

EDIT: it turns out that even number of EUs is not the same. Old ivy HD had 6 EUs, new HSW HD has 10 EUs. So @ ~same clock, they have substantially more resources.
 
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Wall Street

Senior member
Mar 28, 2012
685
6
91
#30
Umm, i am not sure about that. Haswell celly G1820 is GREAT chip for ~40$ and there are some cheapo H81 mobos now, that go along it.

Keyword is graphics: Haswell Gen graphics is better than ivy bridge and that is enough to not look back.

What is sad value, is Haswell Pentiums, G3430 is twice the price, and in cheapo platform relevant features you get 1MB extra of L3 ( nice, but very workload specific) and 600mhz extra clock (~22% more). Graphics (key in those builds) is the same. So ~25% extra performance, for twice the price?

Intel could really sweaten the deal on Pentiums, by throwing in AVX2, Celerons are fine as is.
Take a look at the G3220, which is the best pentium to get. I don't get how the G3430 is $99 while the G3220 is $69 when the difference in 10% clock speed and the lack of 1600 Mhz memory speed in the lower model (which shouldn't matter for a dual core with GT1 graphics). I guess the clock of the G3430 makes it too close to the i3, so it can't price below $100.
 

JoeRambo

Senior member
Jun 13, 2013
642
43
136
#31
Take a look at the G3220, which is the best pentium to get.

Yeah, G3220 was low end cpu to get before Haswell cellies came out (can buy them in my country for 2 weeks now I think). But there is little difference between G3220 and G1820. 300Mhz and 1MB of extra L3 is not worth ~60% extra price, you are not buying any real extra features. Next stop is i3 with real benefits of HT, AVX etc.
 

Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
3,245
0
91
#32
They should just sell this soldered to a cheap motheboard.
Lol no. Celerons are either perfectly adequate or they can set you up for future drop-in upgrades if you're more willing to wait for the i7s or i5s to come down in price on the used market. They also serve well as an inexpensive test spare. I prefer them unsoldered, thank you very much.
 

Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
3,245
0
91
#33
Honest opinion, this Celeron is an insult to the Ivy Bridge based Celerons. If you really can't spend more, then save an additional 15€ and stay with s1155 Celerons and Mainboards.
While it might have bigger price delta where you are, the G1820 will likely sell for about $45 here in the States, and in that case, going Haswell makes more sense. Those who want to play movies on a TV at 23.976 will have absolutely stutter-free playback, and the slight improvements in architecture and the clockspeed bump make the new Celeron still faster than its older counterpart. And the Haswell chipsets provide more at "lower" levels than their S1155 counterpart. B85 supports two SATA 6.0 Gbps ports while B75 only supports one. H87 comes with a full six SATA 6.0 Gbps ports while H77 comes with only two.
 

chubbyfatazn

Golden Member
Oct 14, 2006
1,619
0
91
#35
I'm not too certain why the Celeron line coexists with the Pentium line. I don't see enough tangible difference to warrant the existence of both lines, especially for the targeted market demographic.

I just built an HTPC with a G3220 and for everything I'm expecting it to do I'd say it's still a bit too much. It's replacing an old Android box that my dad bricked trying to flash a new rom (Cortex A9, 1GB ram), and if that's the level of performance you're expecting then even the Cellys should make the cut for the majority of what you do. And yes I know the word "performance" is relative. No troubles with 1080p content so far.

I paid $60 for my G3220. I could've gone the IB route and picked up a G1620 for $35, but the mobo cost would've been identical and the additional benefits of going H87 over H77 were enough for me to fork over the extra money. All I need to do is find a cheap i3 or i5 when Haswell is EOLed and pop it in.
 

lyssword

Diamond Member
Dec 15, 2005
5,760
0
81
#36
Psstt.. over here! shhh, dont tell anyone, but I am currently running g3420 which I got shipped to my door for $71. Running on a $40 mobo and $90 used 7790. 2 months, 0 problems.
 

Wall Street

Senior member
Mar 28, 2012
685
6
91
#37
I'm not too certain why the Celeron line coexists with the Pentium line. I don't see enough tangible difference to warrant the existence of both lines, especially for the targeted market demographic.
I think that the targeted demographic is the market who wouldn't be able to figure out the Intel model naming schemes and the various generations of processors, speeds, core, cache sizes and features. To them, G3220, i3-4340k, g2020 and g1820 are all just a list of numbers. Everyone does know however, since the introduction of Celeron in 1998, it means slow. So they have been trained by Intel marketing to insist on the Pentium brand for the $40 more if they can spare the cash. Just using the name Celeron for the cheap ones is already a very effective up-sell.
 

tential

Diamond Member
May 13, 2008
7,363
0
121
#38
So Baytrail how does that fit in with these out for 42?
 
Mar 27, 2009
12,878
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#39
And the Haswell chipsets provide more at "lower" levels than their S1155 counterpart. B85 supports two SATA 6.0 Gbps ports while B75 only supports one. H87 comes with a full six SATA 6.0 Gbps ports while H77 comes with only two.
Also consider LGA1150 (H81) compared to LGA 1155 (H61).

H81: http://ark.intel.com/products/75016/Intel-DH82H81-PCH

(two 6 Gbps SATA ports, two 3 Gbps SATA ports, two usb 3.0, eight usb 2.0)

vs.

H61: http://ark.intel.com/products/52806/Intel-BD82H61-PCH?q=Intel® H61 Chipset

(four SATA 3 Gbps ports, ten usb 2.0)
 

Wall Street

Senior member
Mar 28, 2012
685
6
91
#40
So Baytrail how does that fit in with these out for 42?
I think that pricing aside, there is a market for one pound devices with ten hour battery life with Bay Trail while even low clock speed Haswell models are going to be three pounds for four hour battery life.
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
6,193
174
126
#41
So Baytrail how does that fit in with these out for 42?
Bay Trail-D tops out at 10 W, these Haswell Celerons are 35W and up. Big Difference. You wouldn't be putting it in a NUC.
 
Aug 25, 2001
43,254
445
126
#42
On the contrary, these chips are rubbish. The last G1610 I had hit 100% loaded up with 1080p youtube vids, multitasking with a couple of programs and explorer windows felt physically slower (sluggish) than an i3/i5, even with an SSD and even though the system was dirt cheap it was crap to be honest. If its all you can afford, by all means, have at it but otherwise buy an i5 at least. You'll have a chip that can do anything and can actually last.
Something was wrong with your rig then. I could play 1080P YouTube on my E-350 rig. A G1610 is much faster.
 
Mar 27, 2009
12,878
24
106
#43
Deleted.
 
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Carson Dyle

Diamond Member
Jul 2, 2012
8,175
88
126
#44
What distinguishes a Haswell Celeron from Haswell i3 (and vice versa)?

Frankly, I'm beyond tired of Intel's marketing bullshit. If it's intended to leave consumers completely confused over their offerings, then bravo, job well done. I just don't get it any more.
 

chubbyfatazn

Golden Member
Oct 14, 2006
1,619
0
91
#45
What distinguishes a Haswell Celeron from Haswell i3 (and vice versa)?

Frankly, I'm beyond tired of Intel's marketing bullshit. If it's intended to leave consumers completely confused over their offerings, then bravo, job well done. I just don't get it any more.
Among other things, features on the i3 not on the Celeron:

Support for AVX, AVX2, FMA3, AES-NI, HT, GT2 graphics (over GT1), a higher pricetag
 

NTMBK

Diamond Member
Nov 14, 2011
8,250
227
126
#48
What distinguishes a Haswell Celeron from Haswell i3 (and vice versa)?

Frankly, I'm beyond tired of Intel's marketing bullshit. If it's intended to leave consumers completely confused over their offerings, then bravo, job well done. I just don't get it any more.
No AVX1/2, no Hyperthreading.

It's the distinction between Celeron and Pentium that has be confused. It's sad to see the "Pentium" brand relegated to bargain basement junk, and the completely non-sensical Core iWhatever brand reserved for mid to high range.

Seriously, if your average consumer has a Nehalem Core iWhatever, are they really going to realise how much faster a Haswell iWhatever is? "My laptop has to be faster than that desktop, it's got an i5 in it but that's only an i3!"
 

skipsneeky2

Diamond Member
May 21, 2011
5,037
0
71
#49
Also consider LGA1150 (H81) compared to LGA 1155 (H61).

H81: http://ark.intel.com/products/75016/Intel-DH82H81-PCH

(two 6 Gbps SATA ports, two 3 Gbps SATA ports, two usb 3.0, eight usb 2.0)

vs.

H61: http://ark.intel.com/products/52806/Intel-BD82H61-PCH?q=Intel® H61 Chipset

(four SATA 3 Gbps ports, ten usb 2.0)

Nice improvements for budget based boards, my new $50 case has usb 3.0 up front but my cheap h61 offers no usb 3.0 but perhaps as a simple gamer that doesn't apply much to me till i look into external usb 3.0 storage or something.

Only item gimped in my build is my ssd, since it was the cheapest 180gb at time of purchase it basically is stuck at sata 3 while the ssd itself is sata 6.:(
 
Mar 19, 2007
12,323
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#50
Me likey. Those have nice passmark scores.
 


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