Fat loss - how to lose the bulge and gain the ripples

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daniellowsley

Junior Member
Dec 15, 2014
1
0
0
1. Change your lifestyle.

2. Drink more water.

3. Consume fewer calories than you burn.

4. Reduce starchy carbs.

5. Eat a full, balanced breakfast.

6. Limit sugar consumption.

7. Rotate your carbs.

8. Drink coffee (black) before working out.

9. Avoid drastic calorie reductions.

10. Eat 5-6 meals a day.
 

formula1

Junior Member
Jan 20, 2015
16
0
0
Can anyone shed some light on the Paleo Diet and the use of appetite suppressants? I am hearing a lot about this Paleo diet as well as a fruititarian diet. Are these just fabs?
 

dlock13

Platinum Member
Oct 24, 2006
2,806
2
81
Great info and thanks for the write-up.

I have one question. What would you say is a good beginner HIIT regime for a moderately fit, but pudgy guy?
 

shortylickens

No Lifer
Jul 15, 2003
82,076
15,891
126
I'm gonna switch to swimming. The jogs and diets are doing enough for me. Lost 15 pounds last year, but thats minimal considering I'm still about 60 pounds over where I want to be.

Much thanks to OP and all the suggestions in this thread. If I see real improvements maybe you guys will get pics.
 

calahan

Member
Sep 4, 2015
126
0
0
Fresh Coffee every day
Fresh Green tea unlimited
Less any carbs
More fruits and veggies
Make some exercises
No beer
No snacks
No salt
More water
 

lawrencemwoody

Junior Member
Dec 16, 2015
1
0
0
Thank you for you post article. Very informative, yes, everyone really want to lose the bulge and the same time building a muscle.

Food is very important when you really want to lose some fat and weight.
 

HeXen

Diamond Member
Dec 13, 2009
7,825
33
91
1. Change your lifestyle.

2. Drink more water.

3. Consume fewer calories than you burn.

4. Reduce starchy carbs.

5. Eat a full, balanced breakfast.

6. Limit sugar consumption.

7. Rotate your carbs.

8. Drink coffee (black) before working out.

9. Avoid drastic calorie reductions.

10. Eat 5-6 meals a day.
I've done all that except #4 is the one I can never do without. I love my starchy's.
I found something I like better than coffee though before a workout, the Black Onyx pre workout stuff that GNC sells has a lot of bang without the crash.

Every discussion of dieting always reminds me of this:
 

IovitaS

Banned
Mar 15, 2016
5
0
0
Fresh Coffee every day
Fresh Green tea unlimited
Less any carbs
More fruits and veggies
Make some exercises
No beer
No snacks
No salt
More water
Agree, except 'no salt'. Limited salt would be better. Salt cause water retention in the body, that's true, but is also needed for acid-base balance. I reccomend Himalayan salt, the most healthy one, but as I said, in very limited amount.
 

shortylickens

No Lifer
Jul 15, 2003
82,076
15,891
126
Alright, I just found a new motive.
My high school reunion is next year. I've got 13 months to get in shape.

Gonna increase my green veggies and decrease the junk, slowly.
Need something that will give me slow, steady, permanent results. I think jogging at my gym will help some, but I should probably add some weight lifting as well.

BUT, I know I'll eventually get bored with jogging. Should I add in yoga or spinning or something else to keep myself entertained?
 

blackdogdeek

Lifer
Mar 14, 2003
14,454
9
81
shorty, if you're looking to lose weight, you'd be better off lifting rather than running, but you'd be best off calculating your TDEE and then weighing your food to make sure you're eating less than 300 cals BELOW your TDEE with myfitnesspal.
 

SlitheryDee

Lifer
Feb 2, 2005
17,252
18
81
Alright, I just found a new motive.
My high school reunion is next year. I've got 13 months to get in shape.

Gonna increase my green veggies and decrease the junk, slowly.
Need something that will give me slow, steady, permanent results. I think jogging at my gym will help some, but I should probably add some weight lifting as well.

BUT, I know I'll eventually get bored with jogging. Should I add in yoga or spinning or something else to keep myself entertained?
Weight lifting doesn't do much for fat loss, but one thing it does do is give you rapid, measurable results that keep you coming back in the long term. Also, your perception of your progress will be far greater because you'll simultaneously be seeing fat loss and muscle growth for a good while in the beginning so long as your diet is in check.

Last year I lost ~85lbs in a 10-11 month span, so I know what you want is possible. I lifted weights from the start because to me "getting in shape" means a combination of diet, cardio, and resistance training. It doesn't even make sense to me to do one without the other, because I'm doing it to look good, not just average.

Diet should be the focal point of your efforts though. Diet is everything. I couldn't have done what I did without tracking what I ate. You can do that with pen and paper, or you can do it with an app on your phone. The app is way easier and less time consuming, but whatever you feel comfortable with is the right answer. I used an app called "myplate", but there are many equally good ones out there. Get into the habit of logging every single thing that passes through your lips and suddenly you'll feel in control of your weight loss like never before. Eventually the same app can be used to help you maintain proper balance of carbs, fat, and protein to aid you in gaining muscle as well, but to start with you'll probably want to focus purely on calories in vs. calories out.

Don't think that now you are in "diet mode" and can't have good food ever again either. Tracking calories is better than getting on any kind specific diet with only certain carefully curated foods that you can have because it doesn't really matter where those calories come from, so long as you come in below the designated number every single day.

You can eat your entire allotment in cake icing if you want to, but you'll quickly learn that there are drawbacks to that approach. For one thing your calories won't go very far, and eating sugary foods ultimately does nothing but make you hungrier in the long term. These are good, concrete reasons to change your diet that you'll come to understand on a visceral level as you progress though. That's much better than simply being told "have this, but not that because of reasons" IMO. In that way you'll slowly steer yourself toward better foods for the simple reason that they're lower calorie and more filling, so you can eat more and feel satiated.

I look at exercise in a similar way. I understand that it's ultimately not going to be the relative optimization or intensity of this training philosophy vs. that one, but the consistency and total time I'm willing to put in that determines just what kind of shape I manage to get into. I want results, but I have to balance that against my own continued willingness to exercise basically in perpetuity. The workouts have to be designed so that I can keep coming back day in and day out. I want to do my work, make some discernible amount of progress no matter how small, and then go about my day having expended as little time and effort as humanly possible. To that end I decided to make my workouts as short and easy as I could while still allowing myself a path for progress. That means that no matter how tired or unmotivated I feel on a given day I KNOW that I can get my workout out of the way without much trouble, so I never dread it and I almost never miss it. I have achieved consistency and probably will be able to keep going essentially forever, which means I'm eventually going to surpass 99% of the people out there who are in danger of burning out because they think the only path to fitness is a grueling, hours long workout 5 days a week.
 

Dr. Zaus

Lifer
Oct 16, 2008
11,770
347
126
Weight lifting doesn't do much for fat loss, but one thing it does do is give you rapid, measurable results that keep you coming back in the long term. Also, your perception of your progress will be far greater because you'll simultaneously be seeing fat loss and muscle growth for a good while in the beginning so long as your diet is in check.

Last year I lost ~85lbs in a 10-11 month span, so I know what you want is possible. I lifted weights from the start because to me "getting in shape" means a combination of diet, cardio, and resistance training. It doesn't even make sense to me to do one without the other, because I'm doing it to look good, not just average.

Diet should be the focal point of your efforts though. Diet is everything. I couldn't have done what I did without tracking what I ate. You can do that with pen and paper, or you can do it with an app on your phone. The app is way easier and less time consuming, but whatever you feel comfortable with is the right answer. I used an app called "myplate", but there are many equally good ones out there. Get into the habit of logging every single thing that passes through your lips and suddenly you'll feel in control of your weight loss like never before. Eventually the same app can be used to help you maintain proper balance of carbs, fat, and protein to aid you in gaining muscle as well, but to start with you'll probably want to focus purely on calories in vs. calories out.

Don't think that now you are in "diet mode" and can't have good food ever again either. Tracking calories is better than getting on any kind specific diet with only certain carefully curated foods that you can have because it doesn't really matter where those calories come from, so long as you come in below the designated number every single day.

You can eat your entire allotment in cake icing if you want to, but you'll quickly learn that there are drawbacks to that approach. For one thing your calories won't go very far, and eating sugary foods ultimately does nothing but make you hungrier in the long term. These are good, concrete reasons to change your diet that you'll come to understand on a visceral level as you progress though. That's much better than simply being told "have this, but not that because of reasons" IMO. In that way you'll slowly steer yourself toward better foods for the simple reason that they're lower calorie and more filling, so you can eat more and feel satiated.

I look at exercise in a similar way. I understand that it's ultimately not going to be the relative optimization or intensity of this training philosophy vs. that one, but the consistency and total time I'm willing to put in that determines just what kind of shape I manage to get into. I want results, but I have to balance that against my own continued willingness to exercise basically in perpetuity. The workouts have to be designed so that I can keep coming back day in and day out. I want to do my work, make some discernible amount of progress no matter how small, and then go about my day having expended as little time and effort as humanly possible. To that end I decided to make my workouts as short and easy as I could while still allowing myself a path for progress. That means that no matter how tired or unmotivated I feel on a given day I KNOW that I can get my workout out of the way without much trouble, so I never dread it and I almost never miss it. I have achieved consistency and probably will be able to keep going essentially forever, which means I'm eventually going to surpass 99% of the people out there who are in danger of burning out because they think the only path to fitness is a grueling, hours long workout 5 days a week.
My weight loss has been without tracking anything: if i'm hungry I eat, as I eat only on-diet that day I never feel continuous hunger pangs.

I do hit chronometer like once a week because i'm a geek, but only eaten whole plant foods i've never had to worry about anything including counting calories.

I have a smoothie (black+blue+rasp berries & 1 cup almond milk, 1tbsp non-alkalized coco powder, 1tbsp ceylon cinnamon (standard cinnamon is poisonous at that level), 1sp cloves, 1tbsp turmeric, crack of pepper) for breakfast,

fruit as ongoing snacks (2 green kiwi, 2 yellow kiwi, 2 apples, 4 oranges, 1 red banana),

A salad at lunch time (1 cup packed: baby kale-spinach-arugula, broccoli, garbanzo beans, black beans, & 1/4th cup of balsamic vinegar),

dinner involves red cabbage, kale, red onion, leeks, fresh broccoli (kids love it w/ mustard), 3 cups of beans (black, red, black-eyed or split-pea), cooked mushrooms, and now a 1/4th cup of black or red rice.

I'm going to increase the beans and rice when I'm ready to stop losing weight.

Drink in the morning: black tea w/ lemon juice and zest of both
Noon: White tea steeped for 5min+ w/ lemon juice, lime juice, and zest of both
Evening: green tea w/ lemon and lime and zest of both

This is known as a "nutrient dense" approach to weight management:

http://nutritionfacts.org/video/nutrient-dense-approach-to-weight-management/
 

mike8675309

Senior member
Jul 17, 2013
477
100
116
My weight loss has been without tracking anything: if i'm hungry I eat, as I eat only on-diet that day I never feel continuous hunger pangs.

I do hit chronometer like once a week because i'm a geek, but only eaten whole plant foods i've never had to worry about anything including counting calories.
I would always recommend someone use something like chronometer anytime they change their dietary intake significantly. The micro nutrients are as important as the macro and people may need to adjust what they are eating to make sure they hit their Daily Recommended amounts for many micro-nutrients.
 

shortylickens

No Lifer
Jul 15, 2003
82,076
15,891
126
With the increase in exercise I have lost 15 pounds so far this year. But thats not enough.
Mom got on Meals to Go and even with minimal exercise she lost 15 pounds in a couple months. I'm gonna try it for bit as well. See if it meshes with increased physical activity and produces better results.
 

Bardock

Senior member
Mar 12, 2014
346
39
91
I am not that fat but trying to get in shape for snowboarding. I have been doing a calisthenic routine of leg lifts and squatting and jumps and going to start running on the treadmill. I am 175-178 lbs and 5'10" so not that bad but too weak for shredding the way I want and would love to be in shape by January. I have been eating a lot less. (I was 210 at my zenith). My brother told me to do pushups and sit-ups and planks which I haven't started, I am really lazy about exercise. But I got an app called FitNotes to track my fitness and progress. Yesterday I did nothing so today I have to do it up. In 2014 I had an abdominal hernia repaired with a mesh screen. I can lift and move fine but my abs are weak and when they are sore it scares me that it's going to break. I need to build muscle around it according to the doc. It's my weakest area and very important in snowboarding. Any advice on ways to train are appreciated. I am going to the Cascades so not the steepest runs but lots of snow, going to need a lot of cardio to walk through it on flat parts. I'm 31.
 

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