Discussion Do you keep emergency supplies at home? (And if so, any plans to increase or decrease those items?)

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
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For the love of all that is holy, please no politics in this thread. I know some are just chomping at the bit to turn this into a left vs. right argument, but this thread is for people and what steps they have taken to being self-sufficient (if they choose to do so) for a period of time if SHTF in a particular region.




After the myriad of issues the U.S. has faced over recent memory (e.g. storms, natural disasters, war, drought, social unrest, Covid, ransomware shutting down gas distribution on the East Coast, water contamination, etc.)

For me, since I grew up pretty poor and went significant periods of time without food, had power, heat, and water disconnected, when I set out on my own (and especially after we had kids), I began to keep extra essentials at home. I also learned first-hand the hard way that with the significant power outages down here, without having a generator, all that chest freezer and main fridge items all went bad and were thrown away (probably I had to throw out around $600 worth of food).

Up until now, I never have gone to the level doomsday preppers, or even what Mormons (are supposed to do), which for me has had me always have at least:

- 2 weeks of non-perishable food

- 2 weeks of drinking water

-Large portable generator (along with extra oil) with enough LP to run for at least a week if ran 24/7

-Chest freezer

-About two weeks worth of charcoal, along with a gas grill that can use the LP tanks on hand.

-Flashlights, lanterns, around a dozen large wax candles, battery power banks for things like cell phones, and multiple kits of rechargeable batteries.

-I keep things for our cars like coolant, brake fluid, oil and air filters, along with at least enough motor oil for an oil change on all four cars,

-Enough heavy clothing / boots / blankets to keep warm in winter.

-Several oil filled radiators that could be run off the generator if needed.

-A first aid kit along with essential things like Pepto, aspirin, Aleve, allergy / sinus medication, and prescription medications to be ok for at least a month.

-Two bags of dry dog food for the puppies.

Some things I'm looking at adjusting going forward based on some near direct hits from hurricanes over the last several years, which caused extended power outages. We also lost power for about a week when a strong thunderstorm had "straight-line winds" took down many power lines (because they runs their lines under trees) across pretty the whole state of NC. We had to wait for electrical crews to come up from states like Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, and Alabama since it was such a large mess to get cleaned up.

I think going forward from here on out, I'm going to change some things up a bit though. For example, once I get some additional shelves in our garage up soon, I will:

-Take the non-perishable food supplies to a 30 day supply

-Take the drinking water up to a 30 day supply, and supplement it with some bottled Gatorade / Propel, and a little bit of soda / energy drinks.

-I'll be looking at possibly storing some non-ethanol gas here for emergency vehicle needs since the whole ransomware thing almost had us where my wife was close to not being able to get to her hospital because gas was sold out everywhere for multiple days. The problems is, there are not many stations down here who sell that, and I'd likely have to drive about an hour outside of area to country type station.

-I might buy a few more LP tanks for powering the generator out to being able to be powered for 2 weeks if powered 24/7. Thankfully it can last up to 10 years, so that's why I use it over gasoline.

-Keeping a 6 pack of 50/50 oil gas premixed so that I can run things like a chainsaw and leaf blower.


Whew, that was a lot to think through this late. :p
 

lxskllr

No Lifer
Nov 30, 2004
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I don't intentionally stockpile stuff, but I have a lot of food stocked cause I mostly shop secondary stores, and when they get something, it's usually a one time thing. When they get something I like, I buy a lot. I keep 10-15G corn free gas for my small engines, and have a small generator.

The only thing I'll intentionally stock to hedge against trouble is toiletpaper. That wouldn't have occurred to me in a million years until covid V1.0. I knew there were a lot of stupid people, but they completely annihilated my estimate. I always had toiletpaper, but it wasn't always my preference. I'll make sure that doesn't happen again.

edit:
for occasional use of small engines, or for storage, look into Aspen fuel. It keeps a long time. It's also nice fuel, and healthier to run. If you don't mind spending the money, it would be better to run all the time in stuff like chainsaws. It's better for the machine, and better for you.
 

deustroop

Golden Member
Dec 12, 2010
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You're gonna need a weapon son and training on its use and maintenance. I don't see no SW radio on the list either.
 

[DHT]Osiris

Lifer
Dec 15, 2015
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I don't intentionally stockpile stuff, but I have a lot of food stocked cause I mostly shop secondary stores, and when they get something, it's usually a one time thing. When they get something I like, I buy a lot. I keep 10-15G corn free gas for my small engines, and have a small generator.

The only thing I'll intentionally stock to hedge against trouble is toiletpaper. That wouldn't have occurred to me in a million years until covid V1.0. I knew there were a lot of stupid people, but they completely annihilated my estimate. I always had toiletpaper, but it wasn't always my preference. I'll make sure that doesn't happen again.

edit:
for occasional use of small engines, or for storage, look into Aspen fuel. It keeps a long time. It's also nice fuel, and healthier to run. If you don't mind spending the money, it would be better to run all the time in stuff like chainsaws. It's better for the machine, and better for you.
I'm in this boat. I unintentionally have a pretty substantial supply of food, a few gallons of drinkable water (river on property so I can get plenty more), lots of paper products.

Aside from that, lots of wood for burning, lots of non electric fire starters, so I could cook outside if need be. Most of my tools are electric unfortunately but I've got an axe so I'd survive if all I needed was wood. Also have a 30-30 with a box of ammo, not enough to wage war with the local cannibal tribe but it'll put down a hungry dog or a tasty deer.
 

stargazr

Diamond Member
Jun 13, 2010
3,439
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Nothing crazy but tend to stock up a little more than I used to since the Covid shortages.

I have a gas grill with an extra full tank of gas for cooking during a power outage. I'd like to also pick up a Coleman gas stove and some fuel bottles for indoor use making coffee etc.

Also like to get a few small portable gas heaters, but keep pushing it off.
 

KB

Diamond Member
Nov 8, 1999
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I used to keep 2 weeks worth of food, but upped it to 4 weeks after the COVID shortages.
I have always had plenty of handsanitizer and medical supplies.

Remember your hot-water heater contains drinkable water in a pinch, so your water supply is higher than you think.
 
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dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
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As an avid hiker/backpacker I just naturally have stuff to sustain myself for a few weeks. Typical backpacking stuff like freeze dried meals (just add water), denatured alcohol for cooking, water purification sets, large boxes of protein bars, multiple 4 gallon jugs of water (full), etc.

As a gear lover, I keep adding to my stockpile of safety items for hiking/backpacking/single track biking/kayaking. I recently got a 5 gallon gas can (full) and a car starter/cell phone charger ( https://us.gooloo.com/products/gt-3000 ). I have headlamps in every bag for every activity. Many first aid kits, tire inflators, hand-cranked power generator/emergency radio, personal locator beacon, GPS, etc. My winter hiking clothing has kept me quite toasty in all day long -7°F hikes (-22°C) with much colder wind chill. No need for that much heat if you have the right clothing to keep you warm.

Add to the list both a large outdoor garden and a small indoor garden. Growing your own food is a great way to be prepared for emergencies. Plus, the left over veggies go into jars of food (mostly tomato sauce).

I'm eying a little solar power, big enough to run the fridge and freezer and a few other things indefinitely, but the cost is just too high at the moment.
or
 
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Mermaidman

Diamond Member
Sep 4, 2003
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I'm stockpiling a list of people with stockpiles that I can hit when the world falls apart. Heck, maybe even when the world isn't falling apart. :p

On a 'serious' note, my literal cash-in-the-sock drawer has increased. I sold some stuff locally and haven't bothered to deposit the proceeds.
 

herm0016

Diamond Member
Feb 26, 2005
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We like to have at least a months worth of things to live. we also raise sheep and rabbits for food, have laying hens. just contracted for 10.8 kw of solar and a backup propane generator to be installed this summer as well. As long as we have power, we will have water from the well and the wood stove is our primary source of heat. I currently have about one seasons worth of wood that needs to be split. soon as I have a truck again, ill be looking for free firewood. we live in a very rural place and most of our neighbors are also well prepared. our valley is fairly defeasible as well. only 2 easy ways in/out and the population is all from one direction.
 

olds

Elite Member
Mar 3, 2000
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I keep a months worth of dehydrated food. We have city water, a well and a generator. We also have go bags that contain
food and water for 3 days. Radio that has weather bands that can operate off of batteries or it's hand crank. First aid kit as well as various fish medications like penicillin, ampicillin, etc. Other misc items, like cord, Leatherman, flint, matches, etc.
 

Stiff Clamp

Senior member
Feb 3, 2021
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propane tanks, propane stove, propane lantern, propane heater
40 cases of bottled water
assorted food - rice, lentils, split peas, peanut butter, canned stuff
packs of flushable wipes
engine oil, lamp oil
 

kage69

Lifer
Jul 17, 2003
21,915
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Yes, since starting a family and still having a penchant for living off in the sticks, I find it prudent to be prepared. Sure paid off in a huge icestorm once. I don't take it to Mormon levels, but I've got about 6-8 weeks worth of water and food for my family and I. Backup hunting and fishing gear along with the normal basic essentials and medical supplies of course. I can run a big gas generator for about 8 days before my fuel storage is spent. Battery packs, solar charging devices and LED lanterns pick up the slack.

Also keep a large cache of backup repair items. Saws, axes, files, hammers, chisels, pliers, plus the disposables like nails, screws, tape, caulk, wire, etc. Can whip up a chicken coop or firewood shelter fast if I need to. Water is easy to come by in VT thankfully, not like out West. I have land to garden and neighbors who keep wagyu cows and pork.

Various home safety measures taken, plus canine eyes and ears are once again on duty. He's no kangal but he'll do.
 

nisryus

Senior member
Sep 11, 2007
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I used to stock up three weeks worth of food and water. But lately with inflation, I have dipped into the food storage and only have a week worth now.. time to stock up again.
 

FelixDeCat

Lifer
Aug 4, 2000
27,560
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I have no supplies. I plan to join the hysterical rush to clean out store shelves during the next hysterical over reaction.
 

njdevilsfan87

Platinum Member
Apr 19, 2007
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Natural disasters in SoCal are the ones that displace you, so there isn't much point in having beyond a month's worth of supply. I guess water shortages are the biggest threat, so we do have a few extra multi-gallon jugs sitting in the garage that get recycled periodically. On the chance a 9.0 earthquake hits, things can be rationed out to 2 months. But beyond that, things are screwed in ways bigger than most can prepare for in which case the above meme applies.
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
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The only thing I'll intentionally stock to hedge against trouble is toiletpaper. That wouldn't have occurred to me in a million years until covid V1.0. I knew there were a lot of stupid people, but they completely annihilated my estimate. I always had toiletpaper, but it wasn't always my preference. I'll make sure that doesn't happen again.
I forgot about that.

I'm the same way after the Covid shortages. Luckily I had just bought toilet paper at Sam's Club during my monthly shopping trip right before Covid really kicked off and the news stations began running the stories prompting everyone to go and wipe out it all out.

I think it was at least 3 months before I came across a package of toilet paper / paper towels in stock. Even then it still sold out almost instantly, and probably was close to a full year before I was confident that if I needed it, I could find it in stock somewhere locally.

You're gonna need a weapon son and training on its use and maintenance.
I'm lethal with my feet in martial arts.



:p
 

Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
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When covid first arrived and there was talks about lockdowns I stocked up food for 2 weeks, figured we'd be in full lockdown for that long and then it would be over. No grocery stores, no take out etc.

When that didn't happen then I felt I should probably still stock up anyway not knowing what the future holds so I started to stock up and add to my pile of canned food. Also rice and frozen stuff too.

When the TP fiasco hit I realized I need to stock up more on that too. I probably have enough for a year now lol. Every time I do groceries I just buy a package too if I have a cart or otherwise room to carry it. Ex: go there for 1 thing, get TP too.

I also have basic backup power, I have 400w of solar on my shed and about 5kwh of battery, and ran power to the house to a separate panel. The setup is not really finalized yet but if SHTF I can at least run extension cord to the only outlet in the basement and at least rotate between the freezer, fridge and other important stuff. Eventually I want to just have outlets at point of use and some kind of transfer switch. I have a small ryobi inverter too that can also act as a power bank, so between all the ryobi batteries I have, as far as powering small devices I have zero issues. Same with light.

I would not consider myself a true prepper though as there are still some things I could do better at, like growing my own food, filtering my own water etc. I do eventually want to get to that point. I'm probably not 100% prepared but probably more than the average person. If SHTF I could at very least manage for a little while. Once I start building on my off grid property I'll of course be way better setup out there.

The real issue with SHTF scenarios is other people though. If people know you are well setup they will come for you. So not only do you need to be well setup you need to be able to defend it all too. This could be hard to do alone if a gang shows up.
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
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This thread will for sure bring out the crazies.
Maybe.

But this thread is more of could you be self sufficient for a period of time if a person's location lost things like power, gas, water for a period of time?". It's not intended to be the end of times style discussion.

For example, in the last 5 years here in NC, we've lost power 4-5 times, and the outage once lasted for 6 days before they were able to restore power in all local areas. Then most people couldn't find gas on the East Coast for 7-10 days because of the rsnsomware attack. Finally, we had about a week of not being able to use tap water because some large truck drained something toxic into the storm drains (caught on video), and the water treatment center couldn't filter it out with their equipment.

During these events, there were large numbers of people having to stand in long lines to get things like food and bottled water because they didn't keep any emergency supplies. The same seems to be common across the country when services are suddenly lost (e.g. power loss in Texas due to extreme cold or in California due to high demand, tornado, hurricane, etc.).
 

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