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Bunny is scared about possible lack of career opportunities.

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enwar3

Golden Member
Jun 26, 2005
1,086
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Take up a side job using some of your photography skills.

I know people who have DJed weddings and parties on the side because they have that skill. Anything like that, you get paid a LOT. You won't get paid as much as a pro, but you'll definitely get something. With photography, try stuff like wedding pics (like nkgreen said). You have to find something that people are willing to shell out for. Like senior pictures. I know seniors in high school who pay high triple digits for senior pictures, and it's mainly because the photographer comes very well recommended. Advertise yourself by word of mouth or Craigslist, meet with people and explain your qualifications. The key is going to be making your clients feel like they're working with a pro, even if it is a freelancing pro. Like have them hold the white/black/gray balance thing and stuff. Make sure they know, and you show, that you're qualified. Even if you charge HALF of what photography studios cost, you'll be making a LOT of money. Especially if you've already got the equipment and software.

And as a, essentially, freelancer, you can do things big studios don't do. Take your clients out to more scenic areas for pictures, make your pricing a little flexible, etc. A lot of big studios only let you purchase in packages. A photo CD (with all the pictures you took) comes in an awkward format and costs hundreds. It would be nothing for you to throw that cd in free, but it would be HUGE to the client.

Seriously. Think about it. With photography skills like yours, and no established business, you can do everything your way. If you do it the right way, people will want to come to you more than professional studios. And- you will get paid very nicely.

Edit: Note that this isn't (could turn out to be, but isn't at first) a full-time job. But even as you're a student, it's a great way to make a significant dollar in your spare time. If you enjoy it, that's an extra plus.
 

fuzzybabybunny

Moderator<br>Digital & Video Cameras
Moderator
Jan 2, 2006
10,455
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Originally posted by: Throckmorton
You didn't go back to CORNELL, one of the best schools in the country, because you were mad at them for giving you a year off? Are you kidding? They did not kick you out.

Get an internship after college. That's what I did
Being mad was just part of the reason. During my time there I got the distinct feeling that the administration didn't care at all about the students. They were just walking dollar signs, and if one goes away, the school is in such high demand that they'll just get a student to replace those who go away.

But by far the biggest factor was expense. It is a full 4 times more to go to Cornell than it is to go to my current college. One year at Cornell pays for four years at my current college. And we weren't certain what benefits this would bring either. Sure, you've got the distinction of graduating from an Ivy League and prime spots for initial jobs, but once in the actual job market it's all about experience. We also were concerned that Cornell would burn me out.

And Miami is definitely know for its business school. Quite a few CEOs are Miami Alumni.
 

RKS

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
6,824
3
81
Dan, is that you??

I think my next door neighbor's son left Cornell Engineering last year. He is back home but I'm not sure if he is finishing up here in the Cincinnati area.
 

fuzzybabybunny

Moderator<br>Digital & Video Cameras
Moderator
Jan 2, 2006
10,455
33
91
Originally posted by: RKS
Dan, is that you??

I think my next door neighbor's son left Cornell Engineering last year. He is back home but I'm not sure if he is finishing up here in the Cincinnati area.
Sorry, I'm not Dan. But leaving an Ivy League is sure a kick to the ego. I feel for him :(
 

Imdmn04

Platinum Member
Jan 28, 2002
2,566
6
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Why did you not go back to Cornell?

With an engineering degree from Cornell, you will practically be lined up for a job offer. "Being pissed at the school" was a very childish reaction and ultimately cost you in the end.

Even aside from the quality of the education and reputation, the connections you will make from an ivy league school alone is worth the tuition.
 

Throckmorton

Lifer
Aug 23, 2007
16,830
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Well keep in mind that you have your whole life ahead of you. But if your goal is to be a well off managerial type of person, life might as well be over anyway.
 

enwar3

Golden Member
Jun 26, 2005
1,086
0
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Originally posted by: Throckmorton
Well keep in mind that you have your whole life ahead of you. But if your goal is to be a well off managerial type of person, life might as well be over anyway.
That's nonsense. This ivy-degree-will-automatically-get-me-a-nice-job mindset only works for those who routinely get spoonfed everything (children of celebrities, for example) - and they would've gotten it anyways. For us normal people, ivy league degrees only make the first job easy. From then on, it's experience. Trust me - I've talked to hiring managers at the company I work at (giant printer corporation, not too hard to figure out) and they say the degree makes little to no difference in the hiring decision. And don't think I say this because I'm an ivy-hater; I too go to a very prestigious university, but it's not because I think that means I'll be set for life.

If you do a good job at your first two places of employment, that will mean much more than a degree from whatever school could ever mean. The only exception I can think of would be a really prestige-based field, like law. And in those cases, it's graduate school people brag about, not undergrad.
 

RedCOMET

Platinum Member
Jul 8, 2002
2,837
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So, i didin't bother to read most of this thread, but being able to speak and somewhat read a foriegn langauge is a good thing, and having traveled in Asia on the business thing that you did was also a good thing.

Having the international exposure, espeically Asia, is more than a bonus than you think. Make sure you put that on your resume, and if possible talk about the experience at future job interviews. I'm sure vising plants and staying with host families was a positive experience, and demonstrates your willingness to learn about other cultures and their businees practices. In a global econmony, having that exposure now is a plus,

So, just keep focused and you know.... if you find a job is interesting but don't think you are completely qualifed for it, apply for the job any way. What the worst than can hapen, you don't get an interview or you do get an interview and get turned down, no big loss their except your time.


Shameless plug though, the oil and gas industry needs people...

<---works in oil/gas industry w/ a Computer Engineering degree not doing anything CoE related. Good stuff :)
 

91TTZ

Lifer
Jan 31, 2005
14,374
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Originally posted by: steppinthrax
The perception is skewed on the success rate for those persons. Statistically persons who don't possess a degree financially do worse then those who do. Income actually increases with degree. It's when we hear about those few who do well without even a H.S. that we think it's a big deal and advertise this. Giving those the perception that you don't need a degree. I would say a few would qualify for this.
Don't forget that those who could have easily earned a degree but decided not to are being lumped in with those who were simply not capable of getting one.

I'd imagine that someone who was accepted into Harvard and decided not to go is going to still make more money than someone who wanted to get into Harvard, couldn't, and decided to pick up a degree at a lesser school.
 

Mxylplyx

Diamond Member
Mar 21, 2007
4,197
100
106
Originally posted by: fuzzybabybunny
Thanks for the replies guys.

My obvious goals are happiness and financial stability, including the ability to retire somewhat early and to have adequate resources to cover mounting costs as I get older.

But I also want to effect the world at large in some way in my work. To work on products that I have an emotional stake in. To take product ideas and bring them to a global market is definitely one way. To be a very important cog in an overall process is also a desire. To strengthen and keep alive the photography market is definitely there too (hence my desire to work for a photography-related manufacturer).

The career fair is so close! (19th of this month). I'm also pretty shy compared to all my extroverted business major peers, and I convey messages better through type than speech. Bah, I'm just going to write up a resume tonight and contact the career center to see if they can help me out.

And yeah, I fully understand that I'll probably have to start out at some podunk company to gain experience before being able to really move up.
Dont worry. Your young. That wishy washy idealism will soon pass.

 

Capt Caveman

Lifer
Jan 30, 2005
34,547
651
126
Get an internship and get some experience. After, get into a company that you might have interest in anyway you can. As a temp or entry level just to get in the doors, bust your ass and show them what you have and work your way up.
 

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