Any recent grads job hunting right now?

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BrownTown

Diamond Member
Dec 1, 2005
5,314
1
0
Originally posted by: asdftt123
Hey guys,

I'm wondering how all the rest of you (esp. c/o 2009) are doing with the job search. I started looking about a month ago and I've been really aggressive. I've applied to about 100 jobs through HR and I'm currently contacting faculty members at my school to look for a clinical research position. I haven't heard anything yet so I'm definitely feeling a bit doubtful. I consider myself a good candidate since I graduated from a top 10 university with a good GPA and background in chemistry, and I have some great experiences...research experience, publications, resident advisor in college, teaching assistant, peer counselor, etc. How's everyone else doing and anyone have any tips that's worked out for him/her?

Its my understanding that graduate school is usually the path you would take with a graduate degree. I know for example my brother graduated from MIT with a decent GPA in chemistry and couldn't find a job for several months despite being a freaking genius. Meanwhile I graduated with a lowsy GPA from a second teir engineering school and accepted a job offer 8 months before I graduated. But if you get a Ph.D in chemistry from a good school its my understanding that you start off like 80-90k. Honestyl, this job market REALLY favors staying in school. Also, if it makes you feel any better I will probably make $100,000 this year (due to shit tons of overtime) and I am far less happy than I was as a dirt poor college kid. Real life is a bitch, stay in school as long as you can. IMO you can have more fun for free on a Saturday night in college than you can have for any amount of money in "real life" (also there are alot more hot chicks in college and none of them are married which is the thing I've noticed in real life all the hot ones already married. and only the fatties left.

EDIT: as for the idiot(s) making comment that a good school doesn't mean anything, they are just jealous, going to a good school makes you life FAR easier. Its not just finding a job, but the challenges you face in college are likely harder than your real job would be. I know the first thing I noticed in my job was just how DUMB all these people were that went to the state schools. Even if you start out the same, in a few years you will be their boss.

EDIT2: for the post above me, I was jsut thinking, and I actually work for the "#1 in their field" company too, but that statement is meaningless since you can get pretty picky to what a "field" really is. Just like every care commercial saying they have the "best in class" cars because they make up a million different classes or something.
 

mugs

Lifer
Apr 29, 2003
48,924
45
91
Originally posted by: BrownTown

EDIT: as for the idiot(s) making comment that a good school doesn't mean anything, they are just jealous, going to a good school makes you life FAR easier. Its not just finding a job, but the challenges you face in college are likely harder than your real job would be. I know the first thing I noticed in my job was just how DUMB all these people were that went to the state schools. Even if you start out the same, in a few years you will be their boss.

You're confusing the people for the school. Of course the people who go to good schools are likely to do better, because the better schools accept better students. Yes there are advantages to going to a top school, but the best people will do well no matter where they go to college (if at all).
 

TecHNooB

Diamond Member
Sep 10, 2005
7,460
1
76
Originally posted by: BrownTown
Originally posted by: asdftt123
Hey guys,

I'm wondering how all the rest of you (esp. c/o 2009) are doing with the job search. I started looking about a month ago and I've been really aggressive. I've applied to about 100 jobs through HR and I'm currently contacting faculty members at my school to look for a clinical research position. I haven't heard anything yet so I'm definitely feeling a bit doubtful. I consider myself a good candidate since I graduated from a top 10 university with a good GPA and background in chemistry, and I have some great experiences...research experience, publications, resident advisor in college, teaching assistant, peer counselor, etc. How's everyone else doing and anyone have any tips that's worked out for him/her?

Its my understanding that graduate school is usually the path you would take with a graduate degree. I know for example my brother graduated from MIT with a decent GPA in chemistry and couldn't find a job for several months despite being a freaking genius. Meanwhile I graduated with a lowsy GPA from a second teir engineering school and accepted a job offer 8 months before I graduated. But if you get a Ph.D in chemistry from a good school its my understanding that you start off like 80-90k. Honestyl, this job market REALLY favors staying in school. Also, if it makes you feel any better I will probably make $100,000 this year (due to shit tons of overtime) and I am far less happy than I was as a dirt poor college kid. Real life is a bitch, stay in school as long as you can. IMO you can have more fun for free on a Saturday night in college than you can have for any amount of money in "real life" (also there are alot more hot chicks in college and none of them are married which is the thing I've noticed in real life all the hot ones already married. and only the fatties left.

EDIT: as for the idiot(s) making comment that a good school doesn't mean anything, they are just jealous, going to a good school makes you life FAR easier. Its not just finding a job, but the challenges you face in college are likely harder than your real job would be. I know the first thing I noticed in my job was just how DUMB all these people were that went to the state schools. Even if you start out the same, in a few years you will be their boss.

EDIT2: for the post above me, I was jsut thinking, and I actually work for the "#1 in their field" company too, but that statement is meaningless since you can get pretty picky to what a "field" really is. Just like every care commercial saying they have the "best in class" cars because they make up a million different classes or something.

Damnit, I go to a state school.

*cries in a corner*