Any recent grads job hunting right now?

asdftt123

Senior member
Jul 27, 2007
612
0
76
Hey guys,

I'm wondering how all the rest of you (esp. c/o 2009) are doing with the job search. I started looking about a month ago and I've been really aggressive. I've applied to about 100 jobs through HR and I'm currently contacting faculty members at my school to look for a clinical research position. I haven't heard anything yet so I'm definitely feeling a bit doubtful. I consider myself a good candidate since I graduated from a top 10 university with a good GPA and background in chemistry, and I have some great experiences...research experience, publications, resident advisor in college, teaching assistant, peer counselor, etc. How's everyone else doing and anyone have any tips that's worked out for him/her?
 

MovingTarget

Diamond Member
Jun 22, 2003
8,999
109
106
Been doing interviews for three months just about. I should have a teaching position secured soon. This market sucks though...bigtime...
 

magomago

Lifer
Sep 28, 2002
10,973
14
76
Originally posted by: FleshLight
Have an interview with a #1 (in their field) engineering firm on Monday.

everyone loves to call themselves #1 in their field lol....

 

sjwaste

Diamond Member
Aug 2, 2000
8,760
12
81
Originally posted by: asdftt123
Hey guys,

I'm wondering how all the rest of you (esp. c/o 2009) are doing with the job search. I started looking about a month ago and I've been really aggressive. I've applied to about 100 jobs through HR and I'm currently contacting faculty members at my school to look for a clinical research position. I haven't heard anything yet so I'm definitely feeling a bit doubtful. I consider myself a good candidate since I graduated from a top 10 university with a good GPA and background in chemistry, and I have some great experiences...research experience, publications, resident advisor in college, teaching assistant, peer counselor, etc. How's everyone else doing and anyone have any tips that's worked out for him/her?

Top ten school plus hard science degree equals grad school. Not a better economic time to do it, either.

I'm a 2009 tier 2 law graduate with good grades. I ended up leaving my career in management consulting for the opportunity and stability in the Federal Government.

If you need any specific advice on resume, cover letters, etc. please feel free to PM me. I worked full time during law school and did my undergrad in business/economics, so I feel like I've been around the block a bit in terms of job search and knowing the fit on certain skills. I will be very happy to help anyone looking around right now.
 

asdftt123

Senior member
Jul 27, 2007
612
0
76
Originally posted by: sjwaste
Originally posted by: asdftt123
Hey guys,

I'm wondering how all the rest of you (esp. c/o 2009) are doing with the job search. I started looking about a month ago and I've been really aggressive. I've applied to about 100 jobs through HR and I'm currently contacting faculty members at my school to look for a clinical research position. I haven't heard anything yet so I'm definitely feeling a bit doubtful. I consider myself a good candidate since I graduated from a top 10 university with a good GPA and background in chemistry, and I have some great experiences...research experience, publications, resident advisor in college, teaching assistant, peer counselor, etc. How's everyone else doing and anyone have any tips that's worked out for him/her?

Top ten school plus hard science degree equals grad school. Not a better economic time to do it, either.

I'm a 2009 tier 2 law graduate with good grades. I ended up leaving my career in management consulting for the opportunity and stability in the Federal Government.

If you need any specific advice on resume, cover letters, etc. please feel free to PM me. I worked full time during law school and did my undergrad in business/economics, so I feel like I've been around the block a bit in terms of job search and knowing the fit on certain skills. I will be very happy to help anyone looking around right now.

Hey, thanks for offering your help. I've gotten my cover letter and resume critiqued by the career center, my parents, professors, and multiple other sources here so I think they look pretty good. Do you have any advice for the job search? I'm about to kick it into high gear tomorrow and start calling HR to get contacts for the faculty members who listed the job postings and try to contact them directly. I'm trying to secure a job around my area (Baltimore) because I have multiple reasons for staying. My current teaching job at the university ends on the 23rd so I'm trying to secure a job in my area of interest (clinical or public health research) and attend grad or med school in a year or two. I feel like I'm almost running out of places to look and people to contact...
 

sjwaste

Diamond Member
Aug 2, 2000
8,760
12
81
Originally posted by: asdftt123
Hey, thanks for offering your help. I've gotten my cover letter and resume critiqued by the career center, my parents, professors, and multiple other sources here so I think they look pretty good. Do you have any advice for the job search? I'm about to kick it into high gear tomorrow and start calling HR to get contacts for the faculty members who listed the job postings and try to contact them directly. I'm trying to secure a job around my area (Baltimore) because I have multiple reasons for staying. My current teaching job at the university ends on the 23rd so I'm trying to secure a job in my area of interest (clinical or public health research) and attend grad or med school in a year or two. I feel like I'm almost running out of places to look and people to contact...

Well, you're clearly at Hopkins. Professors that you worked for are a great start for networking. Ask them if they know anyone that you can talk to, which is really code for a job lead.

Your job field is strong in the DC area (where I live, incidentally), so if you're willing to commute, don't discount federal jobs.

If med school is on the table, try to use the time you have now to work in a hospital. Try to contact some doctors with ties to your school, family, friends, etc to see if you can shadow. It will lead to a bigger job network, but also fulfill a very necessary experiential requirement in your med school application.

Seriously look at the DC area, though. Our unemployment rate is about half the national, and even less for public sector.
 

IEC

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Jun 10, 2004
14,328
4,913
136
I graduated in May. Ended up in Madison, WI area working for a software company. Your resume needs to grab the attention of the person(s) screening for first rounds. Beyond that, prepare yourself for answers to commonly asked interview questions, but don't give canned responses.
 

mcmilljb

Platinum Member
May 17, 2005
2,144
2
81
Originally posted by: sjwaste
Originally posted by: asdftt123
Hey, thanks for offering your help. I've gotten my cover letter and resume critiqued by the career center, my parents, professors, and multiple other sources here so I think they look pretty good. Do you have any advice for the job search? I'm about to kick it into high gear tomorrow and start calling HR to get contacts for the faculty members who listed the job postings and try to contact them directly. I'm trying to secure a job around my area (Baltimore) because I have multiple reasons for staying. My current teaching job at the university ends on the 23rd so I'm trying to secure a job in my area of interest (clinical or public health research) and attend grad or med school in a year or two. I feel like I'm almost running out of places to look and people to contact...

Well, you're clearly at Hopkins. Professors that you worked for are a great start for networking. Ask them if they know anyone that you can talk to, which is really code for a job lead.

Your job field is strong in the DC area (where I live, incidentally), so if you're willing to commute, don't discount federal jobs.

If med school is on the table, try to use the time you have now to work in a hospital. Try to contact some doctors with ties to your school, family, friends, etc to see if you can shadow. It will lead to a bigger job network, but also fulfill a very necessary experiential requirement in your med school application.

Seriously look at the DC area, though. Our unemployment rate is about half the national, and even less for public sector.

If you're interested in med school or biochemistry. Consider doing a program in Medical Technology/Clinical Laboratory Science. It's typically one year program, and you work in a hospital's lab. You'll get a lot of clinical experience which would set you apart from other candidates.
 

Bignate603

Lifer
Sep 5, 2000
13,897
1
0
Originally posted by: asdftt123
Hey guys,

I'm wondering how all the rest of you (esp. c/o 2009) are doing with the job search. I started looking about a month ago and I've been really aggressive. I've applied to about 100 jobs through HR and I'm currently contacting faculty members at my school to look for a clinical research position. I haven't heard anything yet so I'm definitely feeling a bit doubtful. I consider myself a good candidate since I graduated from a top 10 university with a good GPA and background in chemistry, and I have some great experiences...research experience, publications, resident advisor in college, teaching assistant, peer counselor, etc. How's everyone else doing and anyone have any tips that's worked out for him/her?

That may be part of your problem. I was applying for jobs starting about 7 months before I graduated. They usually recruit for the best positions pretty for new grads pretty far out. You may end up waiting for the next round of recruiting for grads from the fall semester. If you're having bad luck spend some time volunteering or something similar. It gives you something to talk about if a recruiter asks what you've been doing with your free time after graduation.
 

AreaCode707

Lifer
Sep 21, 2001
18,440
101
91
Man, I hate to admit it for fear of being discouraging but I'd hate to be in your shoes. Graduated 2003 here and have some good experience at my back. Going fresh into the market right now and competing against other candidates with several years of experience would be very rough.

You've got a good list of non-work experience. It speaks well of your character as a determined, useful and motivated person. That can outweigh experience if you phrase it right. I would say it's your biggest asset if you don't have actual work experience so play it up big and loud in your cover letter, resume objective and bullet points. If you can convey that as your distinguishing factor then you've got a good shot.
 

Farang

Lifer
Jul 7, 2003
10,914
3
0
Been looking since December after graduating. I worked for about a month and half before the company got sold and I got canned, then got another job a while later that I've been working at for a few weeks now. It is mostly manual labor but the pay is just above what I might make in a worthwhile entry-level job, so I haven't applied to anything since I started there. I really need to start up again sending out applications.

You sound like you're in a better position than me, though, but for any liberal arts grads I feel for them. I'm working with about 10 other recent graduates who are doing heavy lifting or customer service while trying to pick up something else in this market.
 

asdftt123

Senior member
Jul 27, 2007
612
0
76
Originally posted by: AreaCode707
Man, I hate to admit it for fear of being discouraging but I'd hate to be in your shoes. Graduated 2003 here and have some good experience at my back. Going fresh into the market right now and competing against other candidates with several years of experience would be very rough.

You've got a good list of non-work experience. It speaks well of your character as a determined, useful and motivated person. That can outweigh experience if you phrase it right. I would say it's your biggest asset if you don't have actual work experience so play it up big and loud in your cover letter, resume objective and bullet points. If you can convey that as your distinguishing factor then you've got a good shot.

Thanks for the advice. I figure my biggest weakness is trying to get myself into a market without experience but everyone's gotta start somewhere. I have a wide range of experiences and stayed busy in college but I'm hunting for a job that didn't relate directly to my studies in undergrad. If it doesn't work out for me by the end of this month then I'm going to volunteer and find something productive to do with my time as I hunt more... I just hope I can live off my savings... :/

Originally posted by: Farang
Been looking since December after graduating. I worked for about a month and half before the company got sold and I got canned, then got another job a while later that I've been working at for a few weeks now. It is mostly manual labor but the pay is just above what I might make in a worthwhile entry-level job, so I haven't applied to anything since I started there. I really need to start up again sending out applications.

You sound like you're in a better position than me, though, but for any liberal arts grads I feel for them. I'm working with about 10 other recent graduates who are doing heavy lifting or customer service while trying to pick up something else in this market.

What type of industry are you trying to get into?

Also, I haven't been following the news and I know next to nothing about economics, but is the job market expected to get any better within the next year-ish?
 

Dr. Zaus

Lifer
Oct 16, 2008
11,770
347
126
Originally posted by: MovingTarget
Been doing interviews for three months just about. I should have a teaching position secured soon. This market sucks though...bigtime...

what are you teaching?
 

Nightfall

Golden Member
Nov 16, 1999
1,769
0
0
If there is anything I have learned, it is that your ability to relocate will dictate just how good of a job and pay that you will get. After I graduated, I moved a couple hours away to take a job that paid better. Sure, I could have applied and got one that was right on my doorstep at the time, but it didn't pay as well or look as good as the one I got a few hours away.

The new grads have it even harder due to the economy. Which is why your ability to relocate will be even more important.
 

Juddog

Diamond Member
Dec 11, 2006
7,852
6
81
Originally posted by: Nightfall
If there is anything I have learned, it is that your ability to relocate will dictate just how good of a job and pay that you will get. After I graduated, I moved a couple hours away to take a job that paid better. Sure, I could have applied and got one that was right on my doorstep at the time, but it didn't pay as well or look as good as the one I got a few hours away.

The new grads have it even harder due to the economy. Which is why your ability to relocate will be even more important.

The problem is that relocating is a bit difficult while you're knee deep in debt and no guaranteed job at where you move to.
 

Codewiz

Diamond Member
Jan 23, 2002
5,758
0
76
I am just an engineer but my team is looking to expand. We need people that have the following qualifications:

BS or MS in Computer Science/Computer Engineering who graduated in the past 2 years
Self Starter who can work independently to solve problems
Strong Java background
Good knowledge of LDAP
Willingness to learn federated identity specs(SAML and InfoCard)

I would normally post in the unemployed thread but there is no specific job available. My boss is just looking to bring people on if we can find qualified folks

Starting salary is typically based on GPA. Last time I looked BS starting salary with a 3.0 or higher gets around 54K and a MS gets around 64K. That is good money in South Carolina because cost of living is pretty low.
 

imported_Imp

Diamond Member
Dec 20, 2005
9,148
0
0
Started a government job last month, finally get my first pay check this week. However, I did receive my pay stub, and it appears that they raped 33% of my gross pay. Not really happy about the job itself, but I'll take it for now. It took 2/3 of a year to find my first permanent job outside college.

Good luck to OP. I was one of six people who beat out 500 others applying for the job.
 

Hacp

Lifer
Jun 8, 2005
13,923
2
81
Originally posted by: asdftt123
Hey guys,

I'm wondering how all the rest of you (esp. c/o 2009) are doing with the job search. I started looking about a month ago and I've been really aggressive. I've applied to about 100 jobs through HR and I'm currently contacting faculty members at my school to look for a clinical research position. I haven't heard anything yet so I'm definitely feeling a bit doubtful. I consider myself a good candidate since I graduated from a top 10 university with a good GPA and background in chemistry, and I have some great experiences...research experience, publications, resident advisor in college, teaching assistant, peer counselor, etc. How's everyone else doing and anyone have any tips that's worked out for him/her?

Ever consider trying to teach high school?