AMD Ryzen (Summit Ridge) Benchmarks Thread (use new thread)

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lolfail9001

Golden Member
Sep 9, 2016
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We know that ryzen does well against a 6900k in gaming
Unless there were some issues with the sample at new horizon, we know that ryzen at 3.4Ghz is sensibly slower than 6900k at 3.5-3.7Ghz even in 4k, actually.
Anything close to 4.5 Ghz on good air cooling and the core i5 non k line is going to have a really tough time fetching the current prices given that AMD is pricing 4C/4T at USD 150 and 4C/8T at USD 199.
Bear in mind that core i5 non k can be easily put in like $40 mobo with stock cooler and it will be just fine. If a mobo+cooler for 4c ryzen that is good enough for safe 4.5Ghz OC totals over $100, they are basically tied. It is the same issue that makes 7350k so unappealing outside of really niche use cases. I assume Ryzen matches Broadwell in OC department.

With that said, i do look forward building myself a little Ryzen workstation in the future.
 

Glo.

Diamond Member
Apr 25, 2015
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I have a question. Why are we talking about Base 4C/8T with 3.4 GHz boost clock?


R5 1300 is 3.3/3.6 GHz...

Did someone typically f****d up information on WTFTech?

Back to topic. What are the Skylake chips boost clocks?

Lets compare: Core i5 6500 with R5 1300:
i5: 3.2/3.6 GHz, 4C/4T CPU. Currently retails for around 199$.
R5 1300: 3.3/3.6 GHz, 4C/8T CPU, rumored price: 175$.
R5 1400X: 3.5/3.9 GHz, 4C/8T CPU, rumored price 199$.
RAM which apparently with B350 chipset can natively work with 2666 MHz(vs. 2133 MHz in Skylake and 2400 MHz for Kaby Lake) memory can make bigger difference in gaming performance, than the CPU IPC.
 
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OrangeKhrush

Senior member
Feb 11, 2017
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Ryzen is being compared to Kaby Lake because that's the product that potential Ryzen buyers will also consider. Nobody is buying Haswell today.
I was refering to perforance and not age, performance of Haswell/DC is still very good today. I believe that Ryzen will replicate haswell level IPC/Throughput which at low frequency is very good. Low clock speed limits will put Ryzen under strain in applications that are clockspeed sensitive howerver I thing a 4Ghz Ryzen will knock the socks of every game available.
 

OrangeKhrush

Senior member
Feb 11, 2017
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Unless there were some issues with the sample at new horizon, we know that ryzen at 3.4Ghz is sensibly slower than 6900k at 3.5-3.7Ghz even in 4k, actually.

Bear in mind that core i5 non k can be easily put in like $40 mobo with stock cooler and it will be just fine. If a mobo+cooler for 4c ryzen that is good enough for safe 4.5Ghz OC totals over $100, they are basically tied. It is the same issue that makes 7350k so unappealing outside of really niche use cases. I assume Ryzen matches Broadwell in OC department.

With that said, i do look forward building myself a little Ryzen workstation in the future.
1700X FTW, still looks the most compelling part in the family. and the silicon yields will be highest quality at the top end.
 

KTE

Senior member
May 26, 2016
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I was reading the detailed papers that i have not read and i found new details:
- The statistics is used to construct a voltage frequency temperature table (10 bit per entry, 10x8 entries, encoding the optimum voltage), so that the statistics must not be performed too often, because the table includes more operating points. The statistics calculate gaussians for various type of circuits and include guard bands. The circuit replica is checked for the results delay and the "near miss" are counted. Near miss are results that are arrived just in time and would be too late if only the Vcore is slightly lower.
- There is one table for each core so the Vcore is calibrated for each and so die inhomogeneity is taken into account (it is possible to have different Vcore for each core, see DLDO specification)
This is why I asked for the table details.
There's always a table, and usually it will be accessible... Overwriteable

How often it is updated and what exact conditions it needs for an upshift/downshift are key.

K10Stat Dev needs to come out of hiding

Different VID/FIDs and power planes have been on AMD CPUs for a long time.

Typically, FPUs are littered with the highest number and most sensitive digital sensors, as it's a region that heats up quicker than any, hence a single point of failure that is well monitored.

But this region is also typically far hotter than the rest of the chip. So I'm wondering if anything has been done to mitigate this.

30W for a core should be perfectly allowable as it has been previously, providing leakage currents are well controlled.

There will always be a priority weighting for such table based schemas, and VID bandings are usually inflexible and strict, being too safe on the side of caution (causing more heat that necessay).

I'll have a full read of the papers now.

Sent from HTC 10
(Opinions are own)
 

lobz

Platinum Member
Feb 10, 2017
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What I meant is, Intel is on pace to ship Cannonlake this year. It's allegedly going to be another Broadwell-like release since - as you say - the process is insufficiently mature for anything but low-power operation. It will be awhile until we see Icelake or anything of its ilk. 2018 would be my guess. It's going to be a bit odd. Also, with AMD's prices being as low as they are, it's really impossible for Intel to counter with their HEDT lineup without significant brand devaluation. Say goodbye to those ph4t margins, Intel.
Ah, I see :) Though I'll have to further add that the problem with 10nm is _a lot_ worse than with 14nm, which was more or less limited to a very inefficient ramp. I totally agree with you, that in light of this, AMD's very aggressive prices are going to be the biggest problem for Intel to swallow the massive extra costs that the 10nm problems bring.
 

Agent-47

Senior member
Jan 17, 2017
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Bear in mind that core i5 non k can be easily put in like $40 mobo with stock cooler and it will be just fine. If a mobo+cooler for 4c ryzen that is good enough for safe 4.5Ghz OC totals over $100, they are basically tied. It is the same issue that makes 7350k so unappealing outside of really niche use cases. I assume Ryzen matches Broadwell in OC department.

With that said, i do look forward building myself a little Ryzen workstation in the future.
Why would you compare a over clocked ryzren 4c to a non over clocking 7400 7500???

At 3.5 GHz the ryzen can match the 7500 of it assuming Haswell IPC and 3.9-4.0 ST turbo with XFR on stock cooler at least.
 

lobz

Platinum Member
Feb 10, 2017
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Its a very serious time for him. For a lot of people in this forum actually.

Or are you the one that laugh at bubbles being burst in your face?
ahhhhh that last sentence must sting a lot to quite a few ppl here :D
 

lobz

Platinum Member
Feb 10, 2017
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I wonder if people who casually talk about 4.7Ghz overclocks on 8c/16t Zen realize they're gonna have to handle a 200W+ CPU.
Exactly how much the 6950X consumes @ 4.7 while being produced on a superior process?
 

coercitiv

Diamond Member
Jan 24, 2014
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Exactly how much the 6950X consumes @ 4.7 while being produced on a superior process?
TomsHardware hit 240W at 4.3Ghz OC. I fully encourage you to go for 4.7Ghz and report your findings. Watch out for solar flares.
At 4.3GHz using a 1.38V setting, and despite a great water-cooling solution, we're looking at a sky-high 240W result. Playing with AVX-optimized apps while keeping the processor from dropping its clock rate can get us all the way to 270W.
 

.vodka

Golden Member
Dec 5, 2014
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TomsHardware hit 240W at 4.3Ghz OC. I fully encourage you to go for 4.7Ghz and report your findings. Watch out for solar flares.
Socket will probably melt before that happens. To be fair, there's 10 cores under that heatspreader. Broadwell in all of its iterations is a crappy overclocker. AT's 6950x did 4.1GHz at 1.3v, Tom's did 4.3GHz at 1.38v. I wonder what Skylake-X will be able to do in this regard.

Nevertheless 8c Ryzen is easily going to draw more than 200w when heavily overvolted and overclocked well past the 4GHz mark under the right workload. You can't fight physics.
 
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lobz

Platinum Member
Feb 10, 2017
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Isn't that a horrible waste of money doing such sidegrade to Zen? You are moving from 8 core @4.4 to 8 core @ some unknown clocks, but you will hardly gain any measurable performance delta to justify it, unless Zen is running @5Ghz or so?
Dude, I don't think he's looking for any financial gain with this.........
 

The Stilt

Golden Member
Dec 5, 2015
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Nevertheless 8c Ryzen is easily going to draw more than 200w when heavily overvolted and overclocked well past the 4GHz mark under the right workload. You can't fight physics.
Ryzen's power consumption is and stays relatively low, unless the user is a complete imbecile and acts accordingly.

Also there is almost no difference in power consumption based on the utilized instructions, like there is with Intel's wide designs (Haswell and newer).
You can achieve pretty much identical power consumption with SSEx as you can with either 128-bit or 256-bit AVX, AVX2 or FMA.
 

Crumpet

Senior member
Jan 15, 2017
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Kaby Lake is not a rebrand. How many times do I have to explain it? I put a lot of effort into those explanations :(
You're right, it's only 95% identical to Skylake to the point where technicians wouldn't describe Kaby Lake as an existing cpu, however it could be seen as Skylake 2.0...
 
Mar 10, 2006
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You're right, it's only 95% identical to Skylake to the point where technicians wouldn't describe Kaby Lake as an existing cpu, however it could be seen as Skylake 2.0...
If you change the circuit implementation and you change the process technology, then why is that not a new CPU? Just because IPC is the same even though performance/watt went up?

Coffee Lake has some really interesting stuff too, even though it uses the same Skylake CPU microarchitecture :)
 
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