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1Tb SSD: Crucial vs Samsung

Owen1001

Junior Member
Feb 27, 2018
3
0
1
Hi everyone,

Just a quick question. I've read a lot about the new SSDs released by both Crucial and Samsung and I'm torn as to which one to go for: Crucial MX500 1TB or Samsung 850 Evo 1TB (as far as I can see, the upgraded 860 evo isn't worth the extra money). The samsung is £50 more, but is the added performance / better cloning software worth the money?

Thanks,

Owen
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
13,503
4,144
146
As a long-time Samsung SSD owner, if I were buying one today, I'd buy the MX500 without a doubt (at current prices).
 

razel

Platinum Member
May 14, 2002
2,304
74
101
Crucial does come with a Acronis (castrated version) cloning software. http://www.crucial.com/clone/ Samsung's version isn't much better last time I tried it. It still doesn't do well when trying to clone laptop HDDs GPT with Secure Boot and their recovery partitions intact and bootable.

Per above. MX500 is a bargain and is hard to justify the additional costs of the 850.
 

thecoolnessrune

Diamond Member
Jun 8, 2005
9,456
383
126
I had this exact decision to make and went with the MX500. As already mentioned, the price of the Crucial is unbeatable with it's performance, and for the tier of Storage I was using it for (games and non-critical data that was otherwise being services by the NVMe drive), the performance between it and the 860 EVO would have been imperceptible.
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
18,200
931
126
IMO you probably will want to reinstall your OS.

I noticed on different size drives windows 10 will change the recovery partition.

So i would only recommend data migration software if your looking at similar size drives, and always do a fresh install when your downgrading or upgrading in storage size.

Also you should check out the micron 1100 i posted about.
Its a 2TB drive by the same company as crucial, at the cheapest dollar / GB point.

I highly recommend also consider you pickup the square trade warranty with it that will cover you for 4 years total or a credit refund back on amazon. I only costs like 7 dollars i think.
 

Owen1001

Junior Member
Feb 27, 2018
3
0
1
So i would only recommend data migration software if your looking at similar size drives, and always do a fresh install when your downgrading or upgrading in storage size.
Thanks for the comments everyone. I went with the MX500.

Aigormorla - do you think this also applies to mac OS? I'm upgrading my 500GB HD to a 1TB SSD and was planning on using the acronis software. What if I made a a 500GB partition in the new SSD and migrated my HD onto that?

Cheers,

Owen
 

thecoolnessrune

Diamond Member
Jun 8, 2005
9,456
383
126
Thanks for the comments everyone. I went with the MX500.

Aigormorla - do you think this also applies to mac OS? I'm upgrading my 500GB HD to a 1TB SSD and was planning on using the acronis software. What if I made a a 500GB partition in the new SSD and migrated my HD onto that?

Cheers,

Owen
I'd say do a reinstall still. Aside from time, a reinstall is almost always going to be the best option. It gives you a chance to clean off old crap, programs that don't matter anymore, and in general refresh your system. Apple, OWC, iFixIt, and the other players still all recommend reinstall + data transfer over direct migration.
 

ronbo613

Golden Member
Jan 9, 2010
1,237
45
91
I have both, can't see any performance difference between the two. Just bought another Crucial, no need to spend more.
 

Owen1001

Junior Member
Feb 27, 2018
3
0
1
I'd say do a reinstall still. Aside from time, a reinstall is almost always going to be the best option. It gives you a chance to clean off old crap, programs that don't matter anymore, and in general refresh your system. Apple, OWC, iFixIt, and the other players still all recommend reinstall + data transfer over direct migration.
Thanks.

I'm still a little confused about the best option for transferring data to the new SSD. I think the best thing to do would be to create a bootable OS X installer and get that on to the new SSD for the fresh install. From there, I can use Acronis data migration, disk utilities to copy files or restore using time machine.

Could somebody suggest the best way to do this? What method would minimse the excess junk that I might potentially transfer over? Do any of these methods cancel out the fresh install that I'm planning to do?

Cheers!
 

BonzaiDuck

Lifer
Jun 30, 2004
14,481
931
126
I'd say do a reinstall still. Aside from time, a reinstall is almost always going to be the best option. It gives you a chance to clean off old crap, programs that don't matter anymore, and in general refresh your system. Apple, OWC, iFixIt, and the other players still all recommend reinstall + data transfer over direct migration.
With all due respect to posters and forum veterans, I've even seen magazine articles (Maximum PC) urging users to completely reinstall the OS every year. I decided long ago to depart from that option. It's not entirely a major chore to reinstall the OS, but you'll spend time gathering up drivers, reinstalling software, and other tedium.

When you do reinstall the OS, you will always find glitches and anomalies that show themselves in the Event logs, and it is time-consuming to track down the fixes for them. Every time I build a new system, I spend days -- perhaps a week or so -- cleaning up all that stuff, searching for the fixes on the MS and other web-sites and forums according to Event ID and other descriptors. So each reinstallation would lead you back into that repetitive mess, if it was ever a priority to you for being a practical perfectionist.

I have one system I built in 2011. It still has the original OS installation. Because it was handed down to another family member, I cleaned up the boot drive, uninstalling software as necessary, and tweaking to eliminate red-bang event-log errors. It's still running flawlessly.

I also don't see why you would need to worry about drives of different sizes in the matter of cloning your OS disk. After the effort I expended building my Skylake system, my familiarity with utility software that offers a cloning function expanded considerably. I'd simply download the Macrium Reflect Free, and use it to clone your disk. If I remember properly, it will clone the source volumes in their original sizes. If the target is a larger disk, you should be able to expand the system volume containing Windows without event or mishap.

I'd only worry as to whether your SSD target is properly aligned when you initialize it. And the utility software, like Macrium or EaseUS -- probably Acronis -- usually assures proper alignment.

Offering these words, I by no means criticize any other views of approaches. But these are the total of my experience in these matters, and I feel comfortable recommending them, or simply following them myself.

ALSO -- ALMOST FORGOT, but it was my first attention reading the OP. For SATA drives, and as a matter of Samsung versus Crucial, I'd simply pick the drive that offers the best capacity, performance in a ballpark range, and the best price. If that means the Crucial drive, get that one. I've had several of both manufactures in SATA SSDs. Certainly the Samsung drives were never problematic, but the Crucials never gave me any trouble. Most recently, I bought their 2TB MX300 model, and it's perfectly tip-top.
 
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