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Ya'll gettin enough water?

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Spacehead

Lifer
Jun 2, 2002
11,716
6,096
136
Maybe i'd better have a "pro" do it :p


Normally not enough water is not an issue around here. I remember checking when we didn't have much rain here & people were having their wells drilled deeper. Checked mine & the water was only a few feet down.
There's a spring that starts behind my house. I've never seen it not flowing in the 30yrs i've lived here.
 

Stiff Clamp

Senior member
Feb 3, 2021
223
53
61
Plenty. April and May were extra moist (and extra cool for Texas) so we're at 4" more rainfall than normal this time of year. But we hit a drydown and normal summer pervades.

Lawns are doing great.
 

Ajay

Diamond Member
Jan 8, 2001
9,422
3,913
136
War and politics is my main worry. I doubt we need to worry about water here in Canada, even in a drought status, it's usually not at a point where we will run out of drinking water, but if the states are at that point then we are in trouble. We already have companies like Nestle setting up pipelines and sucking up millions of gallons of our water to the point that lake levels go down. If we have more of that, it could very well actually cause problems.
Don't worry, as the west dries up we'll (USA) offer you friendly terms for your water - give us your water and we won't annex your country. We've always been open, honest and fair about that stuff. Just ask Mexico. :p
 
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Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
6,281
796
126
Don't worry, as the west dries up we'll (USA) offer you friendly terms for your water - give us your water and we won't annex your country. We've always been open, honest and faira out that stuff. Just ask Mexico. :p
Canucks can keep the crappy real estate. Okay, maybe Vancouver is worth stealing.
 

Iron Woode

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 10, 1999
29,093
9,539
136
It's been raining here at least once a week for the last 2 months. Rained good this morning.

The farmers around here are quite happy for the rain and sunny weather we have been getting so far. Corn is nearly 1 month ahead of schedule and is being harvested and sold now.

Field tomatoes are now available.
 

shortylickens

No Lifer
Jul 15, 2003
80,053
12,827
126
Its not gonna happen. Eventually all the nations of earth will be forced to invest in large scale desalinization plants.
We have the technology.
Nobody wants to spend billions of dollars to make them.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
31,401
4,041
126
He's kind of right. Price of water affects food crops and prices...as well as manufacturing that uses a lot if water.


We had our first measurable rain in over 40 days early this morning. (Just a couple of hundredths of an inch) We need rain here in the PNW desperately.
There was very little rain here last winter and the last measurable rain was, I'm thinking, April? Average rainfall in San Francisco (10 miles from me) is 24.6 inches. 2020 total was 7.8 inches. 2021 so far is probably less. I'm so used to drought conditions here that I basically am always conserving water. My tiny lawn is more than 1/2 dead. I have washed my car I think twice this year, using as little water as possible. Most of my water goes in my backyard on the vegetables, some at the base of the two plum trees. Even washing dishes, I try to not use too much water.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
31,401
4,041
126
Its not gonna happen. Eventually all the nations of earth will be forced to invest in large scale desalinization plants.
We have the technology.
Nobody wants to spend billions of dollars to make them.
IIRC, they do it in Israel. I hear they built one toward southern California but it never went online because conditions improved.

I wonder sometimes if water could be piped down from the PNW, where it seems to rain a ton more than in CA. I suppose it would be prohibitively expensive.
 

Roger Wilco

Golden Member
Mar 20, 2017
1,213
770
136
Woke up yesterday thinking I had a cold (or covid).

I noticed things were exceptionally hazy and dark outside for a cloudless sunny Michigan day.

Eventually, I checked the news and realized wildfire smoke was covering my neck of the woods. The air quality metric on my watch confirmed this as well.

The air improved throughout the day (per my watch), and my "cold" went away.
 

rh71

No Lifer
Aug 28, 2001
52,727
916
126
I live on the island of long. We'll be fine.

Drought and uncontrollable fires... I had always thought the left coast had it better.
 

WelshBloke

Lifer
Jan 12, 2005
28,261
5,306
126
Don't worry, as the west dries up we'll (USA) offer you friendly terms for your water - give us your water and we won't annex your country. We've always been open, honest and fair about that stuff. Just ask Mexico. :p
We'll export you some! We can offer you a variety!
Do you want water from drizzle? We have lots!
At the moment we can probably do you an offer on unexpected downpours!
 
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Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
60,806
9,052
126
www.uovalor.com
IIRC, they do it in Israel. I hear they built one toward southern California but it never went online because conditions improved.

I wonder sometimes if water could be piped down from the PNW, where it seems to rain a ton more than in CA. I suppose it would be prohibitively expensive.
And yet governments don't bat an eye at the willingness to build oil pipelines. Kind of sad that oil is basically more important than water. Though I don't know if I'd like the idea of knowing that our water resources are being piped away, BUT they could easily build a pipeline network to/from areas that are prone to flooding. When flooding conditions start, you just start to pipe the water to the places that need it, before it floods. Everyone wins.
 

repoman0

Diamond Member
Jun 17, 2010
3,546
1,903
136
More than enough here in Massachusetts and the map in the OP confirms it. It’s been exceptionally wet actually. The water table was so high a few weeks ago that my sump pump overheated due to overwork, shut itself down, and I had a couple inches of water in my basement by the time I got home and discovered it. The house is at the top of a 100+ meter hill! I learned my lesson and bought a fancy secondary pump / battery backup unit.

I’ll take refinishing my flooded basement over water shortages and fires though … would never move west at this point even though five short years ago I desperately wanted to.
 
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Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
6,281
796
126
And yet governments don't bat an eye at the willingness to build oil pipelines. Kind of sad that oil is basically more important than water.
Oil does far more than water. There is no rural life in the middle of nowhere without oil. I picked up a magazine for cars and Charles Kettering of GM wrote an article on how the automobile changed how people lived. No longer did people have to be jam packed in cities. Food production and drug production are also based on oil-derived chemicals.
Water helps people live. Oil makes people thrive. Right down to sex itself since oftentimes...people use the synthetic latex when getting down to business.

Giant water distilleries basically need a giant fuel source to separate the salt from the water. Plus, coastal real estate is usually quite valuable....
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
31,401
4,041
126
And yet governments don't bat an eye at the willingness to build oil pipelines. Kind of sad that oil is basically more important than water. Though I don't know if I'd like the idea of knowing that our water resources are being piped away, BUT they could easily build a pipeline network to/from areas that are prone to flooding. When flooding conditions start, you just start to pipe the water to the places that need it, before it floods. Everyone wins.
Oil crossed my mind when I made those comments. One thing I thought, I didn't say, being that we need a LOT (!!!) more water than oil. Piping water like we do oil wouldn't get us very far. Maybe canals???
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
31,401
4,041
126
Oil does far more than water. There is no rural life in the middle of nowhere without oil. I picked up a magazine for cars and Charles Kettering of GM wrote an article on how the automobile changed how people lived. No longer did people have to be jam packed in cities. Food production and drug production are also based on oil-derived chemicals.
Water helps people live. Oil makes people thrive. Right down to sex itself since oftentimes...people use the synthetic latex when getting down to business.

Giant water distilleries basically need a giant fuel source to separate the salt from the water. Plus, coastal real estate is usually quite valuable....
But oil has got us in trouble, that is, the dependency on it. The global warming crisis! The carbon, which is leading to the Pandora's box of methane release as the tundra thaws. Our backs are against the wall. We need oil alternatives. There is no alternative to water, however.
 

Wreckem

Diamond Member
Sep 23, 2006
9,333
791
126
Texas is mostly drought free this year. I haven’t had to water my lawn at all this year other than this past week when I resodded the areas that got trenched during my pool build. It rained yesterday and this morning breaking up the summer heat. I was concerned with laying sod in triple digit heat but it has taken nicely.
 

Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
6,281
796
126
But oil has got us in trouble, that is, the dependency on it. The global warming crisis! The carbon, which is leading to the Pandora's box of methane release as the tundra thaws. Our backs are against the wall. We need oil alternatives. There is no alternative to water, however.
That's true as well, but a lot of non-transportation things will still be based on oil for the foreseeable future. But getting off oil is politically expedient. The Middle East will have less say, for example.

Plastic furniture, for one. After all, the matter of living frugally means products that help one function at the lowest cost, and plastic drawers win on price.

And Big Pharma is never letting oil go. The gazillions of organic compounds are usually made from hydrocarbons.

And the exhaust of consumers in third world countries is much nastier than what comes out uof cars with catalytic converters.
 

Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
60,806
9,052
126
www.uovalor.com
But oil has got us in trouble, that is, the dependency on it. The global warming crisis! The carbon, which is leading to the Pandora's box of methane release as the tundra thaws. Our backs are against the wall. We need oil alternatives. There is no alternative to water, however.
Yeah we only need so much oil because the government and corporations designed society in such a way that it needs it and built the economy around it, and they don't want to change that. Does not actually need to be that way. If we only used oil for materials and not for energy there would not be such a huge need. It would just be a mineral like copper or iron. Zero reason why we can't use electricity for everything and generate that electricity through renewable sources and nuclear. The biggest challenge is storage but take even half the effort that goes into oil, and put that effort towards R&D and the storage solution would pop up overnight.
 
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nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
52,019
4,467
126
IIRC, they do it in Israel. I hear they built one toward southern California but it never went online because conditions improved.

I wonder sometimes if water could be piped down from the PNW, where it seems to rain a ton more than in CA. I suppose it would be prohibitively expensive.
Not lately, it doesn't. 48 days without measurable rain.
 
Feb 4, 2009
31,363
11,771
136
Can someone explain why California hasn’t move to desalination plants. I want to be clear I am no expert in the subject but I do know they are possible. Sort of remember a new type being tested from years ago and California was worried about sucking in too many fish but that can’t be the reason it is holding it up.
 

JujuFish

Lifer
Feb 3, 2005
10,447
428
136
It's been a pretty wet summer in New Hampshire. I feel like the White Mountains haven't had 3 dry days in a row, and some of the trails I want to do haven't had much of a chance to dry out.
 
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uallas5

Golden Member
Jun 3, 2005
1,032
718
136
No problem with water here:
Worcester Surpasses Wettest July In Recorded History – CBS Boston (cbslocal.com)
As of Sunday afternoon, Worcester has recorded 12.67 inches of rain for the month. The previous record was 11.24 inches, set back in 1938.

Oh and that article was from the 18th...so wettest month on record when July was barely 1/2 way over. Ended up with just over 35 inches for the month.


1627930848456.png


Over 80 inches for the year so far with some sort of precipitation 42% of the days

1627930992733.png

Our mold has mold.
 

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