Which battery trimmer to choose?

Red Squirrel

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May 24, 2003
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If you already are invested in a power tool brand I'd go with that one so you get more batteries. I don't have any experience with the other brands listed but did buy a 80v Greenworks one last year, I only used it once since it was near end of summer and my goal is to put a brush cutter attachment on it, but I have good experience with greenworks overall. I have the chainsaw, snow blower, leaf blower, earth auger and electric shovel. The chainsaw and snowblower is what gets the most use.
 
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Feb 25, 2011
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Yeah, it makes sense to get the tools that use the same batteries as what you already have, if you have some battery-electric tools already.

My stuff is all Toro 60v stuff. At the time I bought into their ecosystem, there were fewer options available, but it's all worked well for me.

Greenworks seems like a pretty popular brand - even Costco sells them, and they tend not to sell things for very long if their customers aren't happy with them. That, combined with the generally positive reviews, would make me lean towards that brand. If you can afford it I'd stick with the 80v stuff though. (It's more expensive but it looks like the batteries and motors are beefier.)

IME, if you have a couple extension cords, a plug-in electric tool is usually more power for the money. It probably isn't a big deal for string trimmers, but most battery operated tools are limited to about 1hp (based on battery amperage and discharge specs) and a 120v household outlet can easily provide about 2hp of power, assuming the tool has a motor rated for it.
 

GodisanAtheist

Diamond Member
Nov 16, 2006
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I just wish we got a battery to plug in adaptor so there was no "wired/battery" distinction between tools (but then how would manufacturers get you to buy the same tool twice?)

But the answer in this thread is correct, whatever brand you got, just get more of it.

I'm a yellow man myself (AKA DeWalt) simply by inheriting a lot of my FIL's old tools, so I naturally pick up their tools and equipment as I go.
 
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stargazr

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I have a Black & Decker 40V. A bit lightweight (uses .065 line) but it works great. I was going to get a Lowe's Kobalt but the B&D doubles as an edger - the head swivels around and there's a guide that swings out.
 
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stefs12

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Aug 18, 2017
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I am not buy before, its my first project of this kind.
So you all think greenworks is best?
I was think about this model, but he have a lot of negative reviews, so i am afraid.
link
The problem is i am from Montenegro (small country in Europe), so probably when i get it i cant back, so my decision must be right!
 
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lxskllr

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Nov 30, 2004
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I don't have personal experience, but I'd probably buy echo. I couldn't be happier with their gas products. I've been considering a battery top handle saw to keep with the chipper.

An echo cutter will cost a good bit more than greenworks, but it's professional equipment. You need to determine what your workload will be. Twice a year? Sure, the greenworks is probably ok. If it's something that'll be used all the time, it's worth spending the money and getting something nice. 'As cheap as possible' usually isn't the right answer to any question.
 
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stefs12

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I cant find Echo in my country, and i want to have battery powered because i dont want to mess with gas, oil etc.
 

Ken g6

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I have a Black & Decker 40V. A bit lightweight (uses .065 line) but it works great. I was going to get a Lowe's Kobalt but the B&D doubles as an edger - the head swivels around and there's a guide that swings out.
I have a little B&D 20V. No swing-out guide, but I can turn it upside-down to edge pretty easily. It mostly works for my uses, but it can't cut through some of the toughest weeds.

Speaking of which, @stefs12, what will you use this for? Is it for trimming the edges of nicely manicured grass, or for whacking tall weeds in an unused lot?
 
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stefs12

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Mix, but whacking tall weeds i will said. Not too tall.
I found online similar image what i need to trim:
Tall-grass-weeds-OKC-May-2023-1.jpg
 

herm0016

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Feb 26, 2005
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you may find shindaiwa which is the same as echo. I have some of both of their brands and am very happy with them. maybe AEG, their lawn and garden stuff is good as well, same as ridgid in the states, but we do not get the full line of lawn and garden stuff here.
 

stefs12

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Can someone explain to me difference between this two models?
Model 2 looks a lot of more robust. Model 1 ship to my place, model 2 not.
1 2
 

lxskllr

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Looks like you're interested in greenworks. Seems like a reasonable choice for brand, so I'd stick with that and find the model that'll be most useful to you.

Are you clearing /areas/, or just tidying up edges? The smaller/cheaper units are more suitable for edges. If you want to clear areas, I'd get a bigger, more robust machine. One that could take bladed attachments would be ideal. String trimmers suck. String's a constant hassle to keep working right, and constantly throws plastic shit around around the yard contributing to pollution. However, it works reasonably well for clearing right up against rock, masonry, and utility fenceposts. It's also good for chipping vinyl siding and girdling trees.

Checkout the greenworks site, and figure out which model will be most useful. There's a good chance it won't be the cheapest. Buying solely on price will get you a tool that's inadequate for the job, and is basically junk you paid to have shipped to your house. There aren't any electric string trimmers that work for *my* purposes. I have almost no use for string, and none of them are powerful enough, or have the runtime I need for the kind of jobs I do.

 

Red Squirrel

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May 24, 2003
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If you go Greenworks you may as well go with the 80v line. Honestly I'm not sure why they have so many different voltage classes, they even have a 82 volt line, but they are harder to find. I buy direct off their site, greenworkstools.ca.

For a trimmer 20v is going to be fine, but when picking a platform for yard tools I like to consider future tool purchases as well so the batteries work together. I actually use a Ryobi 18v trimmer for at home and it's been fine. The Greenworks one is more heavy duty and I'll keep that one for my off grid land for clearing trails.
 
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dlerious

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Mar 4, 2004
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you may find shindaiwa which is the same as echo. I have some of both of their brands and am very happy with them. maybe AEG, their lawn and garden stuff is good as well, same as ridgid in the states, but we do not get the full line of lawn and garden stuff here.
Does shindaiwa make electric trimmers? All I saw when I bought mine (10+ yrs ago) was gas powered.
 

Paratus

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I’ve got a ryobi hybrid trimmer. Uses their 18V tool battery or an extension cord. It’s reasonably powerful on the larger 4AH/6AH batteries and I can do my relatively small (~5000 ft^2) yard on a single 4AH battery. I do have a lot of flower beds so there’s a significant amount of linear feet to weed whack even for a moderate sized lawn.
 

GodisanAtheist

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Nov 16, 2006
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I’ve got a ryobi hybrid trimmer. Uses their 18V tool battery or an extension cord. It’s reasonably powerful on the larger 4AH/6AH batteries and I can do my relatively small (~5000 ft^2) yard on a single 4AH battery. I do have a lot of flower beds so there’s a significant amount of linear feet to weed whack even for a moderate sized lawn.

- I was a Ryobi guy until I got married. Then my FIL decided I was better be a DeWalt guy like him.

My garage is like the battle of the clans with 1/2 blue (back when Ryobi was dark blue) and 1/2 Yellow.
 

lxskllr

No Lifer
Nov 30, 2004
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I have two battery tools. An ancient B&D drill I got free from Marlboro ~25 years ago, and a Dewalt impact driver I found in the road last year. I don't really use either of them. I make holes with a handcranked drill, use screwdrivers to install fasteners, and cut wood with a chainsaw or carpentry handsaw.
 
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