What modern slang that is becoming mainstream are you annoyed with?

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cronos

Diamond Member
Nov 7, 2001
9,380
24
91
"Literally" used as the opposite of what the word is supposed to mean.
I came here to post this. What annoyed me the most is that ever since Merriam-Webster caved in and formally recognizes the alternative meaning, the English language no longer have a word to explain something that happens, well, literally. This bugs me to no end.

My second top annoyance is the recent(?) trend of using the phrase 'low key' in almost everything. The original meaning is straight forward, but recently I've heard it used in all kinds of different sentences that to me make no sense whatsoever.

And there you go. After all that I feel like I need to get some kids off my lawn or something.
 

BurnItDwn

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
25,867
1,349
126
I came here to post this. What annoyed me the most is that ever since Merriam-Webster caved in and formally recognizes the alternative meaning, the English language no longer have a word to explain something that happens, well, literally. This bugs me to no end.

My second top annoyance is the recent(?) trend of using the phrase 'low key' in almost everything. The original meaning is straight forward, but recently I've heard it used in all kinds of different sentences that to me make no sense whatsoever.

And there you go. After all that I feel like I need to get some kids off my lawn or something.
I agree with this.

We could simply use a different emphasis word such as "fucking." We could then fucking restrict usage of literally to fucking only fucking mean the fucking literal definition of fucking literal. However, if "fucking" is fucking overused, its fucking emphasis fucking fades.
 

Mai72

Lifer
Sep 12, 2012
11,111
1,447
126
Groovy!

Yea man. That's grooovy! Or, that's a stone grove man.
 

ewdotson

Golden Member
Oct 30, 2011
1,295
1,518
136
Hey, people are complaining about the use of "literally" as an intensifier and that's a practice that's literally centuries old.
 

nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
54,805
7,560
126
Hey, people are complaining about the use of "literally" as an intensifier and that's a practice that's literally centuries old.
Fortunately it had died out for a while, and should have stayed that way. I certainly don't recall it being used in this way in the common parlance until the past few years.
 
Aug 11, 2008
10,451
642
126
Because when someone says "No worries" , you could still be worried about a lot of other things. More accurate would be "dont worry about it " or something specific to the topic in question, not a generalized statement like no worries. In fact to have "no worries" in this day and age, one would have to be completely oblivious to the state of the world.
 

snoopy7548

Diamond Member
Jan 1, 2005
7,500
4,366
136
Because when someone says "No worries" , you could still be worried about a lot of other things. More accurate would be "dont worry about it " or something specific to the topic in question, not a generalized statement like no worries. In fact to have "no worries" in this day and age, one would have to be completely oblivious to the state of the world.
You're interpreting it wrong. "No worries" is widely accepted to mean "no worries" about that specific thing you're saying "no worries" about. It's similar to "don't worry about it" but has more of a double meaning - also means "sure." Like, "can I get a glass of water?" "No worries, mate!"

EDIT: I thought about it a little more. "No worries" is more like saying "no problem" to a request. "Don't worry about it" is like saying "it's OK" to an apology.
 

TXHokie

Platinum Member
Nov 16, 1999
2,547
166
106
The ask
My ask

It is called a request.
This really annoys me at work now. I put people on ignore when they come to me with this. Wish there's a way to autocorrect the "k" with an "s" so people stop using it.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
34,247
6,049
126
It bothers me when a female is shown on TV holding a microphone, interviewing a male athlete who's 12" taller than her and he's looking down on her and calls her "man."
 

lxskllr

No Lifer
Nov 30, 2004
55,809
5,770
126
"Impact(ed)" as a replacement for "affect(ed)". It's used because people didn't pay attention in school, and are afraid of confusing the words effect and affect.
 

shortylickens

No Lifer
Jul 15, 2003
82,076
15,892
126
I think impact gets used these days cuz it sounds more serious. Politicians and reporters especially like to sound more serious or make an even more important, so they use Impact instead of all the other choices.
 

lxskllr

No Lifer
Nov 30, 2004
55,809
5,770
126
I think impact gets used these days cuz it sounds more serious. Politicians and reporters especially like to sound more serious or make an even more important, so they use Impact instead of all the other choices.
Could be. Whatever the background is, it *triggers me.

*That's another one I hate, along with all the other terms go along with everyone's precious feelings. The world sucks. Pull up your panties, and deal with it :^S
 

brianmanahan

Lifer
Sep 2, 2006
23,115
4,559
126
Because when someone says "No worries" , you could still be worried about a lot of other things. More accurate would be "dont worry about it " or something specific to the topic in question, not a generalized statement like no worries. In fact to have "no worries" in this day and age, one would have to be completely oblivious to the state of the world.
it's no different than saying "no problem"

i tell people "no problem" even when helping them was a big annoyance

 

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