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Question Time to ditch the Steam logo for this subforum?

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Time to change the subforum logo?

  • Yes

    Votes: 8 19.0%
  • No

    Votes: 23 54.8%
  • I like clicking on polls

    Votes: 11 26.2%

  • Total voters
    42

Craig234

Lifer
May 1, 2006
38,548
345
126
I voted yes. I love things about Steam. I have over 2000 games, one of the best games ever is the portal series, I check their deals pretty much every day, I am considering their new VR.

But I also like game makers to be paid fairly, and don't like monopolies, especially for no good reason except for 'convenient to have one place' (like how Windows got a near monopoly by everyone porting on it), and so I'd like to see more competition including the lower charges by Epic. Hopefully interfaces will help on the convenience. Galaxy 2.0 is trying that.
 

zinfamous

No Lifer
Jul 12, 2006
105,915
20,835
136
Weren't all games back then "just repetitive garbage after about 15 minutes"? I honestly can't remember one that wasn't. Could be wrong though.
platforming games had variety of puzzles, even if you want to distill it down to "just platforms for 15 minutes and longer" At least the puzzles had variety. The Sierra adventure games were also quite different, and with progressive gameplay when Doom and Wolfenstein were a thing. I much preferred a game like Star Control that certainly had repetitive elements (mining), but there was variety with outfitting your ship, space battles, aliens with different character, story...and you could even play against a friend!

What I didn't like about those games at the time was that for me anyway, the novelty just died off quickly. I never agreed that the games "looked good," but the real issue was that I just got bored blasting away endless hordes of mindless sprites coming after me, for no real reason. I just never got into that. If those were a one-off, it would have been a quirk...but it came to dominate the industry and I just never understood that. :D

I justified games to myself because they were puzzles, they made you think, they required effort and oftentimes various solutions. Doom was the dumbest thing ever--the lowest common denominator, so of course it would win out, I guess. :\
 

Skel

Diamond Member
Apr 11, 2001
6,106
400
136
platforming games had variety of puzzles, even if you want to distill it down to "just platforms for 15 minutes and longer" At least the puzzles had variety. The Sierra adventure games were also quite different, and with progressive gameplay when Doom and Wolfenstein were a thing. I much preferred a game like Star Control that certainly had repetitive elements (mining), but there was variety with outfitting your ship, space battles, aliens with different character, story...and you could even play against a friend!

What I didn't like about those games at the time was that for me anyway, the novelty just died off quickly. I never agreed that the games "looked good," but the real issue was that I just got bored blasting away endless hordes of mindless sprites coming after me, for no real reason. I just never got into that. If those were a one-off, it would have been a quirk...but it came to dominate the industry and I just never understood that. :D

I justified games to myself because they were puzzles, they made you think, they required effort and oftentimes various solutions. Doom was the dumbest thing ever--the lowest common denominator, so of course it would win out, I guess. :\
Fair point. Doom wasn't much more than kill everything that come out you till you get a key and then kill everything to the door. Wasn't very deep in terms of puzzles.
 

Craig234

Lifer
May 1, 2006
38,548
345
126
platforming games had variety of puzzles, even if you want to distill it down to "just platforms for 15 minutes and longer" At least the puzzles had variety. The Sierra adventure games were also quite different, and with progressive gameplay when Doom and Wolfenstein were a thing. I much preferred a game like Star Control that certainly had repetitive elements (mining), but there was variety with outfitting your ship, space battles, aliens with different character, story...and you could even play against a friend!

What I didn't like about those games at the time was that for me anyway, the novelty just died off quickly. I never agreed that the games "looked good," but the real issue was that I just got bored blasting away endless hordes of mindless sprites coming after me, for no real reason. I just never got into that. If those were a one-off, it would have been a quirk...but it came to dominate the industry and I just never understood that. :D

I justified games to myself because they were puzzles, they made you think, they required effort and oftentimes various solutions. Doom was the dumbest thing ever--the lowest common denominator, so of course it would win out, I guess. :\
There are games not like that, of course - I assume you've tried some like Stanley Parable (new version coming this year) and This War of Mine?
 

NTMBK

Diamond Member
Nov 14, 2011
9,298
2,714
136
platforming games had variety of puzzles, even if you want to distill it down to "just platforms for 15 minutes and longer" At least the puzzles had variety. The Sierra adventure games were also quite different, and with progressive gameplay when Doom and Wolfenstein were a thing. I much preferred a game like Star Control that certainly had repetitive elements (mining), but there was variety with outfitting your ship, space battles, aliens with different character, story...and you could even play against a friend!

What I didn't like about those games at the time was that for me anyway, the novelty just died off quickly. I never agreed that the games "looked good," but the real issue was that I just got bored blasting away endless hordes of mindless sprites coming after me, for no real reason. I just never got into that. If those were a one-off, it would have been a quirk...but it came to dominate the industry and I just never understood that. :D

I justified games to myself because they were puzzles, they made you think, they required effort and oftentimes various solutions. Doom was the dumbest thing ever--the lowest common denominator, so of course it would win out, I guess. :\
There's still new puzzle and adventure games coming out, but they're mostly made by indie developers.
 

NTMBK

Diamond Member
Nov 14, 2011
9,298
2,714
136
They always have been made by indies, really; it's just indies used to be the big publishers.
By the mid to late 90s, they got pretty big budget. Voice acting, FMV, 3D graphics, prerendered backgrounds... but then the bottom fell out of the market.
 

Craig234

Lifer
May 1, 2006
38,548
345
126
By the mid to late 90s, they got pretty big budget. Voice acting, FMV, 3D graphics, prerendered backgrounds... but then the bottom fell out of the market.
True, what I meant more was that they'd begun as indies. For example, Sierra became pretty big, but it was an indie that grew. Same for Cyan (Myst), etc.
 
  • Like
Reactions: NTMBK
Feb 4, 2009
30,227
10,754
136
True, what I meant more was that they'd begun as indies. For example, Sierra became pretty big, but it was an indie that grew. Same for Cyan (Myst), etc.
I think it had more to do with that was the time PCs became much more competent and 3D stuff was arriving or C&C with cool visuals and video cut scenes
 

Craig234

Lifer
May 1, 2006
38,548
345
126
I think it had more to do with that was the time PCs became much more competent and 3D stuff was arriving or C&C with cool visuals and video cut scenes
Ya? And the market grew and the better indie devs became larger studios. the list goes on - id software, et al.
 

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