Texas County GOP to Vote on Removing Vice Chairman Because He is Muslim

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Oct 18, 2013
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#26
I an saying to @UberNeuman that he has taken his moral outrage to the fanatical level, and in such a way that he manifests or has begun to mirror the very things he fears. Were he Donald Trump riffing on this issue he would be focused on finding and catastrophizing about two Muslim children who have sneaked across our Southern border and stole two White kids teddy bears.

But realize that you are basically arguing both sides to this issue. The Right is completely corrupted by the bad members and is as such irremediable. Conservatism itself is morally corrupt and so any defense or mitigation of criticism will be seen at best as tacit support.

This is what happens when you label from a political group defective rather than having a difference of opinion.
 
Jan 6, 2005
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#27
It doesn't amaze me in the slightest.

It slightly amazes me that a Muslim person would want to live in Texas.
There is a sizable Persian population in Houston. Some of the best halal food in the country and quite a few trendy hookah bars.
 
Nov 8, 2012
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#28
It doesn't amaze me in the slightest.

It slightly amazes me that a Muslim person would want to live in Texas.
Yeah, I mean... Texas is only the 2nd most diverse state you fucking halfwit moron.

I love dem statements like this. Where your heads are SO FAR up your own ass that you are literally being what you proclaim to condemn... generalizing and stereotyping.
 
Jan 6, 2005
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#29
What’s amusing is if conservative Christians could extract their had from their asses and stop hating on Muslims they would find they probably have many policy goals they and conservative Muslims would agree on.
What’s equally amusing is that the liberals so quick to make Muslims part of their coalition are going to eventually discover that many of them hold social consevative views on numerous issues. Once the evangelical white conservative block loses its political influence, other social conservative coalitions will form.

The same can be said for the largely Catholic immigrant waves that Trump is seeking to stop.

As you pointed out, once the evangelicals get past whiteness as a source of identity, they will find allies amongst the Muslim and central/south American immigrant waves.
 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
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#31
What’s equally amusing is that the liberals so quick to make Muslims part of their coalition are going to eventually discover that many of them hold social consevative views on numerous issues. Once the evangelical white conservative block loses its political influence, other social conservative coalitions will form.

The same can be said for the largely Catholic immigrant waves that Trump is seeking to stop.

As you pointed out, once the evangelicals get past whiteness as a source of identity, they will find allies amongst the Muslim and central/south American immigrant waves.
And even more so if the proper and fundamental appeal of conservative morality in its uncorrupted form is rejected. Things like a need for order, a respect for accumulated life experience, organic purity and cleanliness, etc. are rejected under some excessive focus on equality and justice and nothing else.
 
Mar 25, 2001
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#32
The title of the OP is incredibly misleading. It makes it sound like the GOP in that county is trying to oust him when the GOP is actually defending him from a single lady trying to do so. The first paragraph of the article:

A proposal to remove a Texas county GOP leader from his post because he is Muslim is being met with forceful opposition from Republicans on the county, state and national level, ahead of a vote this week.


OP I can’t help but thing such a misleading title was purposeful. You could have went with CNNs title which wasn’t misleading but preferred to lie:

Texas Republicans defend county GOP leader as group pushes to oust him because he is Muslim
 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
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#33
But realize that you are basically arguing both sides to this issue. The Right is completely corrupted by the bad members and is as such irremediable. Conservatism itself is morally corrupt and so any defense or mitigation of criticism will be seen at best as tacit support.

This is what happens when you label from a political group defective rather than having a difference of opinion.
I think it's what happens if you lack self understanding. It seems to me to be a trivial feat to see the good and bad in everything if you have collapsed duality internally. This isn't easy, of course, because it requires the hero's journey into the underworld, the confrontation of the self with the self denied.
 

Vic

Elite Member
Jun 12, 2001
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#34
"I believe in freedom of religion as long as it's my religion!"

SSDD
 
Oct 18, 2013
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#35
I think it's what happens if you lack self understanding. It seems to me to be a trivial feat to see the good and bad in everything if you have collapsed duality internally. This isn't easy, of course, because it requires the hero's journey into the underworld, the confrontation of the self with the self denied.
You are being logically inconsistent. You say the feat is trivial, yet you say its hard to do.
 
Jan 12, 2005
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#37
Sounds like the overwhelming majority of GOP'ers are on the side of the vice chairman. AT P&N will of course focus on the fringe to pretend this is the general view while ignoring the actual general view.
 
Feb 6, 2002
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#38
The title of the OP is incredibly misleading. It makes it sound like the GOP in that county is trying to oust him when the GOP is actually defending him from a single lady trying to do so. The first paragraph of the article:

A proposal to remove a Texas county GOP leader from his post because he is Muslim is being met with forceful opposition from Republicans on the county, state and national level, ahead of a vote this week.


OP I can’t help but thing such a misleading title was purposeful. You could have went with CNNs title which wasn’t misleading but preferred to lie:

Texas Republicans defend county GOP leader as group pushes to oust him because he is Muslim
Don't act like Republicans hating on Muslims is a one off. Its part of a pattern.
 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
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#39
You are being logically inconsistent. You say the feat is trivial, yet you say its hard to do.
Yes. it's easy to see the sun from the top of a mountain that sticks up through fog, but only if you've made the effort to have already climbed to the top.
 
Oct 18, 2013
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#40
Don't act like Republicans hating on Muslims is a one off. Its part of a pattern.
Republicans more often hate their religious beliefs, but agree with their politics. Democrats hate their politics, and ignore their beliefs.

It was brought up before, but, its ironic that the side that is closest to them would be the conservatives. Dems are the party for Muslims right now, but, only because that group is too small to have much political force. Typically, what Muslims seem to want are more traditional and conservative policies.
 

Vic

Elite Member
Jun 12, 2001
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#41
Sounds like the overwhelming majority of GOP'ers are on the side of the vice chairman. AT P&N will of course focus on the fringe to pretend this is the general view while ignoring the actual general view.
Probably because that "actual general view" only came about after this matter was made embarrassingly public. Plus, some of us have memories longer than Dory, so we can recall when Republicans voted for a guy for President because he said he wanted to ban all Muslims.
 

Stokely

Senior member
Jun 5, 2017
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#42
Yeah, I mean... Texas is only the 2nd most diverse state you fucking halfwit moron.

I love dem statements like this. Where your heads are SO FAR up your own ass that you are literally being what you proclaim to condemn... generalizing and stereotyping.
LOL! Someone peed in your cornflakes this morning.

I was fucking joking. I live in Florida for god's sake, I can't throw stones at anyone. We just elected Rick Scott to the Senate.

There's racists morons in every state, not just Texas, so calm down bunky.
 
Jan 12, 2005
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#44
Probably because that "actual general view" only came about after this matter was made embarrassingly public. Plus, some of us have memories longer than Dory, so we can recall when Republicans voted for a guy for President because he said he wanted to ban all Muslims.
Who wanted to ban all muslims? Citation please.
 
Oct 18, 2013
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#47

interchange

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 1999
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#48
The title of the OP is incredibly misleading. It makes it sound like the GOP in that county is trying to oust him when the GOP is actually defending him from a single lady trying to do so. The first paragraph of the article:

A proposal to remove a Texas county GOP leader from his post because he is Muslim is being met with forceful opposition from Republicans on the county, state and national level, ahead of a vote this week.


OP I can’t help but thing such a misleading title was purposeful. You could have went with CNNs title which wasn’t misleading but preferred to lie:

Texas Republicans defend county GOP leader as group pushes to oust him because he is Muslim
The CNN article has been updated since the OP. The title that I used for the post is exactly as it appeared on the title bar of the CNN article page when the OP was written. I agree that it is leading in suggesting there might be greater support for his removal than there actually was. I considered altering the title but chose not to as it was still accurate and attention-getting.
 

interchange

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 1999
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#49
I can see coming from the same general ideas, but, that was not her argument. Her argument was that he literally did not represent every Republican. Its one thing to want a representative that you can identify with in terms of morality. Its very different to say that someone cannot be an effective leader because they do not agree 100% with the people they are supposed to represent. That would require people to to agree on all issues which is obviously not how people are.

So, its one thing to want to have a relatable person, its another thing to expect that the person represent 100% of everyone's beliefs.



I agree as a general rule that its beneficial to get outside perspectives. But, her stance is that a leader must not be of a group/subgroup that 100% of the followers are not.



While the conflict is not going to end here, there is a side that is morally right on this topic. The pro side to the belief that a leader must not be in conflict with any of the people he leads is wrong.
Her words certainly contain a logical error. 100% of Texas Republicans don't share the same religion, so it is impossible for any person to represent 100% of them in this way. Thus, you can either say that her point is meaningless because it contains logical fault or you can say that people are prone to speak a little bit hyperbolically when making a point and impute a meaning approximate to what she said. If you insist on the former, then I'm with you. But I'm not interested in retreating to logical exercise.
 
Oct 18, 2013
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#50
Her words certainly contain a logical error. 100% of Texas Republicans don't share the same religion, so it is impossible for any person to represent 100% of them in this way. Thus, you can either say that her point is meaningless because it contains logical fault or you can say that people are prone to speak a little bit hyperbolically when making a point and impute a meaning approximate to what she said. If you insist on the former, then I'm with you. But I'm not interested in retreating to logical exercise.
If her goal was to emphasize or exaggerate then I could understand. Her stance seems so extreme that it makes it lose all meaning to me.

I just wonder if others see it the way I do, or, if they see her absolute statement as a valid defense. I would imagine that they are willing to accept it on a superficial level as it gives some sort of a defense for their bigotry. Clearly this is not something I am able to intuit.
 

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