RX 480 PC Crash issue (*Headache*)

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Jan 31, 2017
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Please keep in mind that not all PSUs are made to the same quality, some are trash and have fun effects such as:
Coil Whine
Failure @80% rated capacity
Fire hazard
Completely incorrect voltage delivery
And much more...

That power supply in question (Corsair VS650 650W) doesn't appear to be purchasable from the US newegg, (and in fact I can only find it on amazon.in) which raises a few eyebrows, and would encourage me to not purchase it. I'd personally be eyeballing that thing very closely.
It's been two weeks and didn't seen any negative effects from my PSU (just saying) until I doubted my PSU when the GPU is in use and got freezes. I am happily running my PC without any issues without GPU. And yes, that PSU is not available in the US, only available in ASIA regions I think. I must have spent some time keenly in picking up a good PSU though.

Haha, your sentence is funny 'Raised eyebrows and eyeballed'. xD

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[DHT]Osiris

Lifer
Dec 15, 2015
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It's been two weeks and didn't seen any negative effects from my PSU (just saying) until I doubted my PSU when the GPU is in use and got freezes. I am happily running my PC without any issues without GPU. And yes, that PSU is not available in the US, only available in ASIA regions I think. I must have spent some time keenly in picking up a good PSU though.

Haha, your sentence is funny 'Raised eyebrows and eyeballed'. xD

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
And my PSU didn't have coil whine until I put a gtx970 in it (was a gtx470? before). Don't trust that it's okay because it's okay without the GPU.
 
Jan 31, 2017
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The one common theme I keep hearing is people disregarding a product failure. Just because PSU is rated for such, and should work, doesn't mean it wasn't defective. Just like GPU's, PSU's can fail.

On a new build, it's really tough when something doesn't work right, as everything is new. If you still have the system you had prior, you could use parts from that system to test things out. Without spare parts, this is a very difficult diagnosis.
I agree. Unfortunately, I don't have any spare PC Builds in my home to test out the parts.


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bystander36

Diamond Member
Apr 1, 2013
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It's been two weeks and didn't seen any negative effects from my PSU (just saying) until I doubted my PSU when the GPU is in use and got freezes. I am happily running my PC without any issues without GPU. And yes, that PSU is not available in the US, only available in ASIA regions I think. I must have spent some time keenly in picking up a good PSU though.

Haha, your sentence is funny 'Raised eyebrows and eyeballed'. xD

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
If a PSU is borderline, it will usually/often work when using a lower powered GPU, but cause problems when using a higher powered one. I've had a PSU fail, and work fine with a single GPU, but crash my system when in SLI.

Since the problem only happens with the 480 in use, that does narrow the problem down to those 2 components.

Edit: or maybe the motherboard/PCIe slot.
 
Jan 31, 2017
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And my PSU didn't have coil whine until I put a gtx970 in it (was a gtx470? before). Don't trust that it's okay because it's okay without the GPU.
Oh alright, thanks for the information and headsup, pal. Will be testing my RIG keenly when I receive my new NVIDIA GPU.


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Jan 31, 2017
65
3
6
If a PSU is borderline, it will usually/often work when using a lower powered GPU, but cause problems when using a higher powered one. I've had a PSU fail, and work fine with a single GPU, but crash my system when in SLI.

Since the problem only happens with the 480 in use, that does narrow the problem down to those 2 components.

Edit: or maybe the motherboard/PCIe slot.
Of course, I agree. I will be taking a look at my PSU after installing my new GPU. I think GTX 1060 slightly consumes mid-power from my PSU, I mean obviously stressing my PSU. My intention is, the guy in the YouTube video is using a 'Corsair RM850W' Power Supply which is quite powerful for Gaming PCs, though he got the same crash there. Not only this guy also the other guy, same freeze! Please watch the videos from the links I gave in my main post.


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bystander36

Diamond Member
Apr 1, 2013
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Of course, I agree. I will be taking a look at my PSU after installing my new GPU. I think GTX 1060 slightly consumes mid-power from my PSU, I mean obviously stressing my PSU. My intention is, the guy in the YouTube video is using a 'Corsair RM850W' Power Supply which is quite powerful for Gaming PCs, though he got the same crash there. Not only this guy also the other guy, same freeze! Please watch the videos from the links I gave in my main post.


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I'm not sure why his problem would change what your problem is. All you can really learn from his, is new ideas to try. Just because his PSU is rated for 850W, doesn't mean it didn't fail. I've had 850W PSU's fail as well. The problem I described before was with an 850W PSU.
 

SlickR12345

Senior member
Jan 9, 2010
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www.clubvalenciacf.com
Please keep in mind that not all PSUs are made to the same quality, some are trash and have fun effects such as:
Coil Whine
Failure @80% rated capacity
Fire hazard
Completely incorrect voltage delivery
And much more...

That power supply in question (Corsair VS650 650W) doesn't appear to be purchasable from the US newegg, (and in fact I can only find it on amazon.in) which raises a few eyebrows, and would encourage me to not purchase it. I'd personally be eyeballing that thing very closely.
According to toms hardware rating its level 4 rating, which means comparatively its bad, but its still good enough, meaning its not in the category of stay away from it.

I've seen these type of cases and in most cases its the GPU. Faulty PSU would cause problems throughout or most commonly won't even start. The fact that he is getting issues only when gaming is probably the gpu. I would have suspected the PSU more if it was even worse quality one, but this one is of passing level.
 
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tamz_msc

Diamond Member
Jan 5, 2017
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Since the RX 480 is known to exceed its power draw, and coupled with the fact that this particular card, the ASUS STRIX has problems with heat dissipation, and also got really bad thermal paste, I am sticking with my guess that this is a issue with the card drawing excessive power.

Of course, not much can to be done now as the OP has already returned the card.
 

pj-

Senior member
May 5, 2015
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I had a faulty EVGA 850w psu and the symptom was random system shut offs during gaming. Replaced under warranty and have had no problems for almost a year now.

I wouldn't bet against the PSU being at fault.
 

Bacon1

Diamond Member
Feb 14, 2016
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Yep all hardware can have defects even brand new "high end" stuff. That's why people recommend testing isolated parts to try to narrow down the issue. Hopefully the GPU replacement you get will work fine. But don't blame all hardware on one off issues.

GPU, PSU, Motherboard or Memory could all cause the problems you are having, why having a second machine or spare parts is great as it lets you swap out to test and find the problem part.
 
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bystander36

Diamond Member
Apr 1, 2013
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Be sure to let us know after a couple months as well. A bad PSU can and has taken time before it damages a GPU enough to have issues, slowly eating up hardware over and over until replaced.
 
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May 11, 2008
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OP, sometimes you can receive a dud. It happens. But it is not wise to discard a whole gpu line just because one faulty card.
Although just introduced cards can have design flaws because of rushed production.
We have seen this with various AMD and Nvidia based designs. Just read through the forum.
GPU cards are manufactured by the hundred thousands and sometimes you receive a defect one. It happens.
A quality 500W PSU is more than enough for any rx480 card.
If an 850W psu cannot handle a humble RX480, that power supply is defective or just a bad design.
I for example have a season 520W supply and have played for hours without any issue.
I hope that the card you initially got was a manufacturing dud and that you can have fun gaming times with your new card.

As a side note because you are a new pc builder:
Some equipment gets damaged because of unproper ESD handling.
Any pc component is an esd sensitive device.
It is good practice to own and use an esd bracelet.
This esd bracelet will make sure you and the largest metal surface of the pc case(which is Ground) have the same voltage potential.
Also, do never touch the pci-e connector of gpu card with your bare hands.
Always touch the metal mounting bracket first and then the other side of the gpu card.
This way , the ground surface of the gpu will have the same potential as you.
Through the bracelet you have the same potential as the pc case, minimizing any possible electrostatic sparks.
With ESD it is basically that every conductive surface holds an electric charge(skin is also conductive) . And when two different electrically conducting surfaces meet while having a different voltage potential, this difference will equalize, usually through a spark which holds enough energy to damage for example the gpu chip or the pci-e bridge chip on the motherboard.
But ram, the cpu and any component might get damaged.
The lower the humidity is of the air in your environment, the worse esd gets.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrostatic_discharge



 
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bystander36

Diamond Member
Apr 1, 2013
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106
While an ESD bracelet is the recommend and best solution to this, I bet most people around here don't have them and use a low tech technique to help with static. Most people will avoid working over shag carpet, and always grab their case to discharge any static electricity built up on them before touching any component.

Of course if I still lived in Reno, there is no way in a million years I'd touch a component without one. Static electricity was a huge problem in that climate.
 
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May 11, 2008
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Yeah, a sort of solution to the lack of an ESD bracelet is to constantly touch the chassis of the case which is connected to the motherboard ground layer and touching the metal bracket of any AIB pcb that will be inserted and not to move and to be fully naked as well. :D This way, the build up of charge is reduced as well but not eliminated. Even while standing still, the build up of charge can happen between a layer of clothes and skin. :D
 
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bononos

Diamond Member
Aug 21, 2011
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So, GTX 1060 can be handled by my PSU? I am thinking to buy a ZOTAC GTX 1060 6GB. Is that good or else should I choose MSI?

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Your PSU is fine, the other poster is simply clueless. The VS series from Corsair is basic but should be more than enough. It uses a single 12v rail that pumps out 50A which is alot.
 

bystander36

Diamond Member
Apr 1, 2013
5,154
132
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Your PSU is fine, the other poster is simply clueless. The VS series from Corsair is basic but should be more than enough. It uses a single 12v rail that pumps out 50A which is alot.
No one is saying it shouldn't be enough. People are questioning what part is failing/dead on arrival. Either the GPU or the PSU has failed. No part is immune to failing, even if it's doesn't happen that often.
 

tamz_msc

Diamond Member
Jan 5, 2017
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Your PSU is fine, the other poster is simply clueless. The VS series from Corsair is basic but should be more than enough. It uses a single 12v rail that pumps out 50A which is alot.
The PSU cannot be ruled out, as there are at least three different product lines of the VS series - VS 400/500/600 for the US, which are 80 Plus Bronze certified, the VS 450/550/650 for EU which are 80 Plus certified, and another series of SKUs that are uncertified. Guess what, these non-US variants are discontinued, if the information here is correct:http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page447.htm
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page447.htm
So you cannot rule out the possibility that those uncertified models ended up in the Asian market. Without proper testing, there is no reason to not be suspicious of the PSU's ability to deliver more than the ATX specifications on the PCIe cable - something that can definitely happen with custom RX 480s.
 

bononos

Diamond Member
Aug 21, 2011
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The PSU cannot be ruled out, as there are at least three different product lines of the VS series - VS 400/500/600 for the US, which are 80 Plus Bronze certified, the VS 450/550/650 for EU which are 80 Plus certified, and another series of SKUs that are uncertified. Guess what, these non-US variants are discontinued, if the information here is correct:http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page447.htm
So you cannot rule out the possibility that those uncertified models ended up in the Asian market. Without proper testing, there is no reason to not be suspicious of the PSU's ability to deliver more than the ATX specifications on the PCIe cable - something that can definitely happen with custom RX 480s.
The 80plus certification only tests the efficiency of the PSU, its not a test for quality. Some brands like Gigabyte, CM have models which meet the 80plus standard but they do not want to pay for certification on low end models because it would cut into the already low margins. Or they have sell psus without PFC and do not meet 80plus standard but are still reliable. These are not legal in US/EU but some Asian countries do not have standards on consumer products being required to have PFC.

You link also shows other psu lines having many models being discontinued (CS, GX, TX). Corsair is replacing those lines/models with better certified models from what I can see, so its not something that it limited to the VS series.

The problem with the RX480 is the excessive power draw from the pcie motherboard connector not from the 6pin cable.
 

tamz_msc

Diamond Member
Jan 5, 2017
3,382
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The 80plus certification only tests the efficiency of the PSU, its not a test for quality.
The fact that they did not apply for certification does not exclude the possibility of Corsair's confidence in the product being high enough to think it'll clear the test, which may indirectly affect its quality as well.
You link also shows other psu lines having many models being discontinued (CS, GX, TX). Corsair is replacing those lines/models with better certified models from what I can see, so its not something that it limited to the VS series.
They are two different line-ups of the VS series SIMULTANEOUSLY in two different markets, with one being of possibly inferior quality. FYI I think the OP is form India and amazon.in has the uncertified version of the VS650 http://www.amazon.in/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/253-7094567-6457043?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=corsair+vs+650
The problem with the RX480 is the excessive power draw from the pcie motherboard connector not from the 6pin cable.
This is no longer an issue as it has been fixed with a driver update.
 

Bacon1

Diamond Member
Feb 14, 2016
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Also regardless of quality of normal units, it could be a defective part. Any of those parts could have been the issue. Could have been a bad 480, bad PSU, bad mobo, bad memory, heck maybe even a failing HD causing it to crash when not being able to read something. Usually parts that need to be replaced die within the first week or two of use, not months in, so with new builds its hard to tell unless you have other parts to test against.
 

bononos

Diamond Member
Aug 21, 2011
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The fact that they did not apply for certification does not exclude the possibility of Corsair's confidence in the product being high enough to think it'll clear the test, which may indirectly affect its quality as well.

They are two different line-ups of the VS series SIMULTANEOUSLY in two different markets, with one being of possibly inferior quality. FYI I think the OP is form India and amazon.in has the uncertified version of the VS650 http://www.amazon.in/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/253-7094567-6457043?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=corsair+vs+650
There are psu's like the Fortron Hexa which had 80+ then withdrew from certification and stuck its own 80+ label to cut down on certification costs. Same psu, just a change of label. A more likely reason for the discontinuation is that the VS series is uncompetitive at its price point because consumers in US/EU prefer a psu with bronze or at least 80+ certification.

If you're going to assume that the Corsair VS is so bad that it cannot power a 150-200W card, it wouldn't be smart to recommend changing the video card to a 1060 which you did. The better thing to do would be to replace the psu.
 

tamz_msc

Diamond Member
Jan 5, 2017
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A more likely reason for the discontinuation is that the VS series is uncompetitive at its price point because consumers in US/EU prefer a psu with bronze or at least 80+ certification.
That may well be true, but still doesn't mean that the OP's unit has no issues delivering more power when necessary through the PCIe connector which the RX 480 requires.
If you're going to assume that the Corsair VS is so bad that it cannot power a 150-200W card, it wouldn't be smart to recommend changing the video card to a 1060 which you did. The better thing to do would be to replace the psu.
I recommended changing to the GTX 1060 because it typically won't consume more than 140W under maximum load, which should alleviate any issues the OP's PSU might have with regards to power draw, if that is indeed the case. A typical RX 480 can easily consume upto 200W, sometimes even more, if the ASIC quality is low.

I asked the OP if he wants to get a new PSU, and he didn't seem to respond to that, that is when I recommended him to return it and get the GTX 1060. Maybe I should have asked him again if he wanted to change his PSU.
 
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