Processed meat can cause cancer

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BUTCH1

Lifer
Jul 15, 2000
20,433
1,769
126
I do not know what that is, but if it is the content of a bowel, that is a bad butcher. A proper butcher cuts out very carefully the heart, lungs, stomach and intestines of the carcass. And stores these for examination by a vet. At least that is what quality butchers do. When the intestines are cut open, the proper procedure is to not wash or wipe away the contamination (shit) of the carcass, but cut away a large part of the meat surrounding the contaminated spot. This is done, because the intestines carry bacteria that will be spread over the carcass when washed or wiped away.

The heart and lungs are saved to be examined. This way, the vet can see if the animal had a bacteria or virus infection when cutting open the heart and examining for example the heart valves.

Unfortunately, since the meat industry is big business and penny pinching has been done to the max, the proper procedures are not always done on every carcass and some not even at all.

EDIT:
Forgot the intestines and other organs. These are cleaned i guess and grinded for other purposes or to eat such as baked liver.

That is a "short loin", it's where T-bone and porterhouse are cut from. If it's removed from the bone it's the tenderloin and strip-loin (or NY strip, KC strip, ect). This animal had cancer, that is the pus and discharge. I've seen it in top sirloin butts before but never in a short loin, we also have no idea if that photo has been touched-up or not. The large Co's that pack 99% of all the meat use a person to do one part of the operation. One guy will be on a vertical-moving platform and cut the carcass in half and from there all the primal cuts are broken down with a person trained to do one job in assembly-line fashion.
 

marincounty

Diamond Member
Nov 16, 2005
3,227
5
76
Isn't raw fish consumption in Japan/Korea considered a significant part of why their stomach cancer rates are so much higher than ours? Raw, cooked, processed, doesn't matter.

EDIT: nvm, Googling it looks like it's actually broiled fish and a salt-heavy diet that is considered a risk factor, apparently.
No, I believe it's the pickled food the Japanese eat that causes the stomach cancer.
But apparently all of the smoking and drinking they do is canceled out by eating raw fish and rice? They are the longest living people on earth last time I checked.
What's ironic is when Japanese visit here- the first thing they want to do is go get a steak!
 

tortoise

Senior member
Mar 30, 2013
300
12
81
Perhaps sectioning hot dogs prior to boiling for 10-15 minutes will leach out at least some of the nitrites and nitrates. Works well for mac & cheese and salads.
 

destrekor

Lifer
Nov 18, 2005
28,799
359
126
I first heard of this in the 1990s so I am not sure why people are surprised.

Yep. Nitrates and nitrites have been questionable for a long while - you definitely want to minimize intake.

Red meats, when cooked most ways, are subject to certain chemical changes on the exposed surface (like charring), and these end products are not good to eat often.

These studies say nothing of lean white meats, but the prep style is still a factor.

If you pan cook and sear steak (cast iron), you definitely want to use an oil with a high smoke point. Don't use butter or olive oil or canola oil... use grapeseed oil. I think there are a few other ones that work very well. The purpose? Lower smoke point = smoke = oxidizing the oil = oil chock full of free radicals = bad.

You won't really get that much with olive oil below 350ºF, so cook away with it then. But if any ever get smoke, you have used the wrong oil for the temperature used.
 

lxskllr

No Lifer
Nov 30, 2004
57,513
7,716
126
I don't eat much meat, but my favorites are the worst kind... Spam, sausages, bacon... Yum :^D
 

Ns1

No Lifer
Jun 17, 2001
55,413
1,570
126
Pick one.

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Ns1

No Lifer
Jun 17, 2001
55,413
1,570
126
Unpossible, a good meat product that looks like a hot dog is a bratwurst. Other things are pretenders, there can be only one.

I love me a good brat too, but they each have their time/place.
 

CurseTheSky

Diamond Member
Oct 21, 2006
5,401
2
0
There's so many disease and condition-causing things to think about these days that I only focus on the major ones. I don't smoke. I don't sit around breathing in lead fumes. I don't dance around in asbestos. If I feel like having a steak, or a beer, or a baked potato, or whatever is going to be bad for me next year, I do. Life is too short to worry about the 0.001% increased chance of getting cancer that whatever I ate just gave me.

I'd reckon that you could run a study proving virtually any food (even heath-craze beloved tofu and hummus) leads to increase risks of cancer in great enough quantities. It's just a matter of waiting for the next flavor-of-the-month study to come out.
 

edro

Lifer
Apr 5, 2002
24,328
68
91
So the NBC Nightly news just said there was a 17% increase in risk of colon cancer if you eat higher levels of processed meat.

There is a 2000% risk of cancer if you are a daily smoker.
That really puts it into perspective.

Move along, nothing to see here... just more sensationalist media.
 

CraKaJaX

Lifer
Dec 26, 2004
11,905
148
101
everything gives you cancer who gives a shit.
This is the perfect first post for this BS. I agree 110%.

'This product is known to cause cancer in California...' Well, good thing I'm about as far as you can get from California. I guess I'm safe here. :rolleyes:
 

Matthiasa

Diamond Member
May 4, 2009
5,755
23
81
So the NBC Nightly news just said there was a 17% increase in risk of colon cancer if you eat higher levels of processed meat.

There is a 2000% risk of cancer if you are a daily smoker.
That really puts it into perspective.

Move along, nothing to see here... just more sensationalist media.

This is news from over a century ago, which is why the percent of nitrite in cured products has been regulated so long as well as why in the US manufacturers are forced to add antioxidants into those products... Nothing new came from this recent study.
 

sportage

Lifer
Feb 1, 2008
11,493
3,159
136
Cancer in moderation should be ok for you.
Just don't overdue.

And by the way, smoking causes cancer too and I don't see where everyone quit smoking nor the tobacco companies looking like some abandoned GM warehouse up in Flint.

"Americans have the right to cancer. Keep big government OUT of our lives."
Sarah Palin.
 

zinfamous

No Lifer
Jul 12, 2006
110,667
29,342
146
I guess it goes without saying that the absolute lowest quality cuts of "meat" held together by salt and chemicals you can barely pronounce will have a detrimental impact on your long term health.

I think anyone with a halfway functioning common sense would understand and accept that.

Well, the report defines "processed" as anything cured, as well--so any meat that has been altered by human intervention. So that "artisinal" prociutto and pancetta are just as bad...

well, it's nothing new to the CSoA. This is really old stuff. Still, who gives a shit? Only one life to live. Live it deliciously.
 

OverVolt

Lifer
Aug 31, 2002
14,278
89
91
This is news from over a century ago, which is why the percent of nitrite in cured products has been regulated so long as well as why in the US manufacturers are forced to add antioxidants into those products... Nothing new came from this recent study.

Yup. In the 70's is when they started reducing the amount of nitrosamines formed in industrial processing. Something like a big brand name hot dog with vitamin C added has less nitrosamines than some organic, gourmet version as they often seem to skip the vitamin C to boost the smokey flavor. Because the latter has no idea what the hell they are doing. I think only hot dogs require vitamin C. I have a general idea which brands add it and which brands don't in different products.

Some brands of beer have almost zero nitrosamines and again, microbrewers are the one who have no idea what they are doing on a chemical level.
 

Slew Foot

Lifer
Sep 22, 2005
12,381
96
86
So the NBC Nightly news just said there was a 17% increase in risk of colon cancer if you eat higher levels of processed meat.

There is a 2000% risk of cancer if you are a daily smoker.
That really puts it into perspective.

Move along, nothing to see here... just more sensationalist media.


I like the point that was made, eating 1 hot dog a day raises your lifetime risk of colon CA from 5% TO 6%. Meh.
 

Matthiasa

Diamond Member
May 4, 2009
5,755
23
81
Yes but that is actually only an issue due to people liking to burn there food... Without excess heat the antioxidants already added reduce nitrosamine production to near undetectable levels.

[url=http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/meat-preparation/bacon-and-food-safety/ct_index]USDA[/url] said:
A bacon cooking study, "Effect of Frying and Other Cooking Conditions on Nitrosopyrrolidine Formation in Bacon" (Journal of Science, Vol. 39, pages 314-316), showed no evidence of nitrosamines in bacon fried at 210 °F for 10 minutes (raw), 210 °F for 15 minutes (medium well), 275 °F for 10 minutes (very light), or 275 °F for 30 minutes (medium well). But when bacon was fried at 350 °F for 6 minutes (medium well), 400 °F for 4 minutes (medium well), or 400 °F for 10 minutes (burned), some nitrosamines were found. Thus, well-done or burned bacon is potentially more hazardous than less well-done bacon. Also, bacon cooked by a microwave has less nitrosamine than fried bacon.

USDA
 
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