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Per Fox News Red States Are Packed

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Nov 8, 2012
20,778
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lol love how people are trying to equate obesity to a partisan issue - as if it has any relevance whatsoever.

As if democrats don't live in red states as well.... Nope, it's just a constant infinite sea of republicans. Didja know that all those red states every year during elections have 100% republicans? Yeap, zero vote blue.
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
33,697
12,477
146
lol love how people are trying to equate obesity to a partisan issue - as if it has any relevance whatsoever.

As if democrats don't live in red states as well.... Nope, it's just a constant infinite sea of republicans. Didja know that all those red states every year during elections have 100% republicans? Yeap, zero vote blue.
haha, it's the dem's fault anyways, you should celebrate.

but seriously, if you review the CDC's stat maps, it clearly not partisan outright....yet it's hard to ignore where the unhealthiest american populations are concentrated. You can go ahead and just admit those states are really just a majority Democrat, fine with me, then explain why the majority doesn't run the state.
 
Feb 4, 2009
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1prophet and starbuck will be along shortly to properly address this.
lol love how people are trying to equate obesity to a partisan issue - as if it has any relevance whatsoever.

As if democrats don't live in red states as well.... Nope, it's just a constant infinite sea of republicans. Didja know that all those red states every year during elections have 100% republicans? Yeap, zero vote blue.
@ch33zw1z BING!
Here it is #bothsides!
 
Nov 8, 2012
20,778
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haha, it's the dem's fault anyways, you should celebrate.

but seriously, if you review the CDC's stat maps, it clearly not partisan outright....yet it's hard to ignore where the unhealthiest american populations are concentrated. You can go ahead and just admit those states are really just a majority Democrat, fine with me, then explain why the majority doesn't run the state.
I'm really not, you're apparently misunderstanding my post.

I'm legitimately saying this isn't a partisan issue. It's cultural, work related, weather related, urban vs rural related, public transit walking vs. car commuting related, education related, and a bunch of other factors I'm sure.


That and obesity is up... literally... everywhere that is developed including Europe, Australia, etc..

1573056272232.png
 
Feb 4, 2009
31,110
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I'm really not, you're apparently misunderstanding my post.

I'm legitimately saying this isn't a partisan issue. It's cultural, work related, weather related, urban vs rural related, public transit walking vs. car commuting related, education related, and a bunch of other factors I'm sure.


That and obesity is up... literally... everywhere that is developed including Europe, Australia, etc..

View attachment 12915
#allsides!

The point is the ranking show historically Red States are fatties. Historically Blue States are toward the bottom of the list.
Per Fox News
 
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nOOky

Platinum Member
Aug 17, 2004
2,065
901
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The educated tend to be healthier and more into proper dieting and fitness on the whole. Dems tend to be more educated, so you could anecdotally conclude that on the whole they would be less obese than conservatives.

I am very big into exercise and fitness. Many of my conservative co-workers think staying in shape is for "fags" and they would never think of running or biking to work. I could say anecdotally that in my workplace and in the upper midwest as a whole that conservatives seem to be more into fast food and zero exercise over their educated exercising counterparts.

Regardless it is a national epidemic, right up there as one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. But it's easier to take pills than to change your lifestyle.
 
Nov 8, 2012
20,778
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The educated tend to be healthier and more into proper dieting and fitness on the whole. Dems tend to be more educated, so you could anecdotally conclude that on the whole they would be less obese than conservatives.

I am very big into exercise and fitness. Many of my conservative co-workers think staying in shape is for "fags" and they would never think of running or biking to work. I could say anecdotally that in my workplace and in the upper midwest as a whole that conservatives seem to be more into fast food and zero exercise over their educated exercising counterparts.

Regardless it is a national epidemic, right up there as one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. But it's easier to take pills than to change your lifestyle.
Your "assertions" don't hold up in the slightest unless you're insinuating that...

1) We are becoming less educated than in the last 10, 20, 30, 40 years (definitely not true)
2) That conservative states in general are less educated - which again, there is no basis for that - especially because you can't measure such things on a state by state since the issue is likely more at a local level.

Hell, if you want the best cancer treatment with the best up-to-date research guess where you should fly to? Texas mofo ;)
 
Feb 4, 2009
31,110
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Your "assertions" don't hold up in the slightest unless you're insinuating that...

1) We are becoming less educated than in the last 10, 20, 30, 40 years (definitely not true)
2) That conservative states in general are less educated - which again, there is no basis for that - especially because you can't measure such things on a state by state since the issue is likely more at a local level.

Hell, if you want the best cancer treatment with the best up-to-date research guess where you should fly to? Texas mofo ;)
Without much research it appears many of the “fat” states are rated at average IQ of 100 or less.


6A64A367-1E43-4ED7-B752-95BB313A9AE3.png

Top of the list:

B85DF47C-A7B4-4DB6-A9F9-9BA81F953ED2.png
 
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ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
33,697
12,477
146
I'm really not, you're apparently misunderstanding my post.

I'm legitimately saying this isn't a partisan issue. It's cultural, work related, weather related, urban vs rural related, public transit walking vs. car commuting related, education related, and a bunch of other factors I'm sure.


That and obesity is up... literally... everywhere that is developed including Europe, Australia, etc..

View attachment 12915
You're posts are easily "misunderstood", since they're mostly rants and attacks on liberals.

In the great country of ours, these ailments are heavily concentrated to the midwest and southeast. I blame diet and exercise for the most part, where the root cause of that blame is from is certainly a case by case situation at times(cultural, socioeconomic, etc). People, as a whole, in developed and developing countries are less active than any point in our history that I can think of (off the top of my head).

I source most of my information regarding this topic from here: https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html
 

nOOky

Platinum Member
Aug 17, 2004
2,065
901
136
Your "assertions" don't hold up in the slightest unless you're insinuating that...

1) We are becoming less educated than in the last 10, 20, 30, 40 years (definitely not true)
2) That conservative states in general are less educated - which again, there is no basis for that - especially because you can't measure such things on a state by state since the issue is likely more at a local level.

Hell, if you want the best cancer treatment with the best up-to-date research guess where you should fly to? Texas mofo ;)
It took me all of 10 seconds Googling "are educated people healthier" to reinforce my case. And I'm a 45 minute drive from the Mayo clinic which is where I'd go for cancer treatment. I've heard they do a reasonably decent job with some things.

And I believe I typed "anecdotally" multiple times.
 
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kage69

Lifer
Jul 17, 2003
18,745
11,148
136
Minnesota is the 6th healthiest state. Are you sure you want to use the winter as an excuse for Iowa?
I agree, it's all about mindset and culture. I've always thought Iceland to be a great example. Maybe fat states should take their cue and invest in gyms, pull all TV broadcasting for the summer months.

Go chop firewood for a couple hours when it's 12 degrees outside. It's motivational - you get to see the calories evaporate right off ya!
 
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Sunburn74

Diamond Member
Oct 5, 2009
4,415
1,747
136
Obesity correlates strongly with education. At the end of the day, the obesity issue is largely an education issue and its without a doubt clear that red states are doing the worst job by far when it comes to education of its citizenry.
 
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Nov 8, 2012
20,778
4,750
136
Obesity correlates strongly with education. At the end of the day, the obesity issue is largely an education issue and its without a doubt clear that red states are doing the worst job by far when it comes to education of its citizenry.
Show me ANY remote proof of that.

Why is it that once any country becomes more industrialized (1st world) do obesity rates skyrocket? If anything, the MORE educated a country becomes the more the obesity increases.

Even fucking Asia isn't immune to the trend.



To be clear, I'm not saying education isn't a factor - but if you think it is THE factor then you're incredibly mistaken.
 
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Feb 4, 2009
31,110
11,527
136
Show me ANY remote proof of that.

Why is it that once any country becomes more industrialized (1st world) do obesity rates skyrocket? If anything, the MORE educated a country becomes the more the obesity increases.

Even fucking Asia isn't immune to the trend.



To be clear, I'm not saying education isn't a factor - but if you think it is THE factor then you're incredibly mistaken.
Post #35 says hello I’m here.
Top fat list and lowest IQ scores look pretty similar.
Highest IQ list and least fat list look pretty similar.
 

woolfe9998

Lifer
Apr 8, 2013
13,961
9,385
136
Show me ANY remote proof of that.

Why is it that once any country becomes more industrialized (1st world) do obesity rates skyrocket? If anything, the MORE educated a country becomes the more the obesity increases.

Even fucking Asia isn't immune to the trend.



To be clear, I'm not saying education isn't a factor - but if you think it is THE factor then you're incredibly mistaken.
It's a factor.

 
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Maxima1

Diamond Member
Jan 15, 2013
3,338
657
126
Post #35 says hello I’m here.
Top fat list and lowest IQ scores look pretty similar.
Highest IQ list and least fat list look pretty similar.
Genetics contributes significantly to the risk of obesity in various ways. It's highly heritable, but I've never seen anyone suggest it has considerable overlap with the genes associated with educational attainment or intelligence. That list by itself is just some measurements. You need a stat analysis of it of which would have to include a lot more data.

This doesn't really say much at all. It only suggest an association.

Conclusions

Future research should address these gaps to understand if the relationship between educational attainment and obesity may be causal, thus supporting education policy as a tool for obesity prevention.

Let's say they did get a study saying it is causal to some degree...this would probably be as effective as business ethics classes or high school PE. Taking classes is a poor tool for cultivating culture. And of course you're saying ANY higher education which obviously has more to do with other factors related to educational attainment.

Some highlights within the link:

Education may be associated with health via adult socioeconomic status (e.g. income and occupation4,7), but also via health literacy and health behaviors4,7-10 and sense of control and empowerment11.

For example, one study found that receiving dietary information as a way to reduce obesity was more effective among those with a higher education132. Alternatively, socioeconomic status may mediate the education-obesity relationship; most studies have not isolated the effects of education separately from other socioeconomic measures, including measures of income that may also be associated with obesity

We acknowledge several limitations to this study. Most importantly, the heterogeneity in the way articles measured education and obesity and reported measures of association hampered our ability to summarize across the studies beyond direction of association, especially since some of the measures of association may have reported total effects and others reported only direct effects. An additional issue when considering the studies that reported direct effects is that none adjusted for all possible mediators, and these analyses, which adjusted for mediators using more traditional approaches, could actually lead to additional sources of bias.
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
33,697
12,477
146
Genetics contributes significantly to the risk of obesity in various ways. It's highly heritable, but I've never seen anyone suggest it has considerable overlap with the genes associated with educational attainment or intelligence. That list by itself is just some measurements. You need a stat analysis of it of which would have to include a lot more data.
Genetics doesn't play a big enough role in a short period of time to account for the drastic increase in obesity over a few decades. We can agree that there are some people who are more prone to obesity regardless of diet, and we can agree that diet / exercise / lifestyle is a contributor for many others. We, as an entire people group, dropped the "normal" type of diet in trade for a high sugar diet about 40 years ago. I can say that personally, when I stopped eating added sugar (not natural sugars), I dropped weight quickly. I'm confident that many people would benefit weight-wise from a low glycemic load diet.

I'm willing to share my secret diet with anyone :p


This doesn't really say much at all. It only suggest an association.

Conclusions

Future research should address these gaps to understand if the relationship between educational attainment and obesity may be causal, thus supporting education policy as a tool for obesity prevention.

Let's say they did get a study saying it is causal to some degree...this would probably be as effective as business ethics classes or high school PE. Taking classes is a poor tool for cultivating culture. And of course you're saying ANY higher education which obviously has more to do with other factors related to educational attainment.

Some highlights within the link:

Education may be associated with health via adult socioeconomic status (e.g. income and occupation4,7), but also via health literacy and health behaviors4,7-10 and sense of control and empowerment11.

For example, one study found that receiving dietary information as a way to reduce obesity was more effective among those with a higher education132. Alternatively, socioeconomic status may mediate the education-obesity relationship; most studies have not isolated the effects of education separately from other socioeconomic measures, including measures of income that may also be associated with obesity

We acknowledge several limitations to this study. Most importantly, the heterogeneity in the way articles measured education and obesity and reported measures of association hampered our ability to summarize across the studies beyond direction of association, especially since some of the measures of association may have reported total effects and others reported only direct effects. An additional issue when considering the studies that reported direct effects is that none adjusted for all possible mediators, and these analyses, which adjusted for mediators using more traditional approaches, could actually lead to additional sources of bias.

This CDC link indicates while the relationship between education and obesity were complex, it's stands out among certain groups.

Discussion

During 2011–2014, the relationships between obesity and income, and obesity and education were complex, differing among population subgroups. Whereas overall obesity prevalence decreased with increased levels of income and educational attainment among women, the association was more complex among men.


Similar to results based on data from 2005–2008 (4), during 2011–2014, obesity prevalence was lower in the highest income group among women, but this was not the case among men. In fact, among non-Hispanic black men the prevalence of obesity was higher in the highest income group than in the lowest income group. Both women and men who were college graduates, on the other hand, had lower prevalences of obesity than did persons with less education.


In general, prevalence of obesity among women was lowest among college graduates, although among non-Hispanic Asians there was no difference in prevalence by level of education. This relationship was not seen when obesity was examined by income level. For example, obesity prevalence was lower in the highest income group among non-Hispanic white women, but among non-Hispanic black women, prevalence did not differ between the highest and lowest household income groups. In contrast, among both non-Hispanic black women and non-Hispanic white women, the prevalence of obesity was lower among college graduates than among women with some college. This difference in the relationship between obesity and income and obesity and education has been reported in at least one other study (7) in children. These findings demonstrate that lower levels of income and education are not universally associated with obesity; the association is complex and differs by sex and race/Hispanic origin.


This is the first report to describe differences in obesity prevalence by income and education among non-Hispanic Asian adults. There were no significant differences in prevalence by income or education among either non-Hispanic Asian women or men; however, there was a pattern of decreasing prevalence with increasing income among non-Hispanic Asian women.


The findings in this report are subject to at least two limitations. First, BMI is a proxy for body fat and BMI ≥30 was applied to persons in all racial/Hispanic origin groups, which might result in underestimating health risks for certain populations. For example, it has been suggested that the BMI cut point (≥30 kg/m2) that typically defines obesity might be too high for Asians and underestimate associated health risks (8,9). Second, the small sample size among some subgroups reduced the ability to detect differences when differences exist. Additional years of data might provide more information about obesity prevalence by income, especially among non-Hispanic Asian women.


Trends in obesity prevalence over time show that differences by income and education have existed at least since 1999–2002 among women. Among men, college graduates have consistently had a lower prevalence of obesity, whereas differences by household income have been less consistent. Further study is needed to understand the reasons for the different patterns by sex and race/Hispanic origin in the relationship between obesity and income or education.
On a "kinda" side note. I find it humorous that a poster with a history of chastising low IQ people for being low IQ doesn't think that low IQ has anything to do with obesity.
 

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