Pelosi: Our Coasts Need Lasting Protection from Oil and Gas Drilling

Steeplerot

Lifer
Mar 29, 2004
13,051
6
81

Washington, D.C. ? Speaker-designate Nancy Pelosi released the following statement today on news media reports that President Bush is considering lifting the presidential moratorium protecting Alaska?s Bristol Bay from oil and gas drilling:

?The Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989 showed the world the devastation and destruction that oil spills could have on Alaska?s fragile waters. Under intense pressure from an angry public, Congress did the right thing by placing Alaska?s Bristol Bay under a moratorium; President Clinton later also signed an executive moratorium. Oil spills would devastate Bristol Bay?s prolific fishing industry, Native American communities, tourism industry, abundant marine life, and diverse and endangered wildlife.

?The American people paid $95 million to buy back leases from oil companies to ensure that Bristol Bay would be forever protected from devastating oil spills. Yet this week, with the stroke of a pen, President George W. Bush is expected to reverse progress and turn back the clock by lifting the presidential moratorium. Allowing oil drilling to go forward in Bristol Bay puts our precious environment at risk. Allowing new oil company leasing of these lands is an insult to all taxpayers who have helped protect them.

?Our domestic oil supplies are valuable but limited. We should not sacrifice our marine ecosystems, robust tourist economies, and fishing communities for the sake of extracting every last drop of oil from American soil.

?Our fragile coasts, from Alaska to California to Florida, require greater protection than a mere presidential moratorium that can be easily lifted. Lasting protection under the law is essential. So is a comprehensive plan that builds our economy around clean, homegrown, renewable energy sources and exciting new technologies.

?While the Bush Administration dances to the oil companies? tune, Democrats intend to achieve energy independence within 10 years.?

Link

Now THIS is the kind of action Dems should be taking, quit with the raping the continent for those last few drops, there are better ways.
 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,095
513
126
Achieve energy indepdendence by closing off our natural resources? This is the line of thinking for the past 30 years that has increased our foreign imports of oil from ~30% to over 60%.

People like you lap it up and ask for more.

Please explain to us how to achieve energy independence in a realistic way while not tapping internal resources?

 

Steeplerot

Lifer
Mar 29, 2004
13,051
6
81
Originally posted by: Genx87
Achieve energy indepdendence by closing off our natural resources? This is the line of thinking for the past 30 years that has increased our foreign imports of oil from ~30% to over 60%.

People like you lap it up and ask for more.

Please explain to us how to achieve energy independence in a realistic way while not tapping internal resources?

First step is to cut the greedmongers off from the black heroin.
 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,095
513
126
Originally posted by: Steeplerot
Originally posted by: Genx87
Achieve energy indepdendence by closing off our natural resources? This is the line of thinking for the past 30 years that has increased our foreign imports of oil from ~30% to over 60%.

People like you lap it up and ask for more.

Please explain to us how to achieve energy independence in a realistic way while not tapping internal resources?

First step is to cut the greedmongers off from the black heroin.

Oh and please tell us oh wise one how you do that.
 

K1052

Elite Member
Aug 21, 2003
46,021
32,990
136
"Democrats intend to achieve energy independence within 10 years"

I intend to have a billion dollars in my bank account and sleep with different smoking hot 20somthings every night.

*wakes up*

 

Steeplerot

Lifer
Mar 29, 2004
13,051
6
81
Originally posted by: Genx87
Originally posted by: Steeplerot
Originally posted by: Genx87
Achieve energy indepdendence by closing off our natural resources? This is the line of thinking for the past 30 years that has increased our foreign imports of oil from ~30% to over 60%.

People like you lap it up and ask for more.

Please explain to us how to achieve energy independence in a realistic way while not tapping internal resources?

First step is to cut the greedmongers off from the black heroin.

Oh and please tell us oh wise one how you do that.

Just have to wait for energy bill huh? They are not even in power yet.

Hopefully you have lots of oil stock, looking forward to your whining :laugh:
 

K1052

Elite Member
Aug 21, 2003
46,021
32,990
136
Originally posted by: Steeplerot
Originally posted by: Genx87
Originally posted by: Steeplerot
Originally posted by: Genx87
Achieve energy indepdendence by closing off our natural resources? This is the line of thinking for the past 30 years that has increased our foreign imports of oil from ~30% to over 60%.

People like you lap it up and ask for more.

Please explain to us how to achieve energy independence in a realistic way while not tapping internal resources?

First step is to cut the greedmongers off from the black heroin.

Oh and please tell us oh wise one how you do that.

Just have to wait for energy bill huh? They are not even in power yet.

Hopefully you have lots of oil stock, looking forward to your whining :laugh:

Energy (key word) companies are the leading investors in alternative power/fuels. They want to remain in business and that eventually means coming away from traditional sources (oil and gas). Any stock he has will likely do very well.
 

dmcowen674

No Lifer
Oct 13, 1999
54,894
47
91
www.alienbabeltech.com
Originally posted by: Steeplerot

?Our fragile coasts, from Alaska to California to Florida, require greater protection than a mere presidential moratorium that can be easily lifted. Lasting protection under the law is essential.

So is a comprehensive plan that builds our economy around clean, homegrown, renewable energy sources and exciting new technologies.

?While the Bush Administration dances to the oil companies? tune, Democrats intend to achieve energy independence within 10 years.?

Link

Now THIS is the kind of action Dems should be taking, quit with the raping the continent for those last few drops, there are better ways.

I'll believe it when I see it.

The U.S. has had 33 years to get away from Oil Baron dependence and instead has gotten more dependent on it.
 

ayabe

Diamond Member
Aug 10, 2005
7,449
0
0
Originally posted by: K1052
"Democrats intend to achieve energy independence within 10 years"

I intend to have a billion dollars in my bank account and sleep with different smoking hot 20somthings every night.

*wakes up*

Anything is possible, you just have to 'believe' :p

There is an easy way to power our future, we just need to invent a way to generate electricity using high minded rhetoric.

Being an FL resident I do have some stake in this but I see no other alternative at this point, drilling offshore is inevitable, the best we can hope for is that all due diligence is being done to safeguard against disasters. Failing to secure energy resources for the future would basically signal the death knell for modern society.
 
Jun 27, 2005
19,251
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They've already proven that what they SAY they are going to do and what they ACTUALLY do are two different things.

Restricting access to natural resources is not the way to energy independence. Creating alternatives to oil is a good thing but for now we still need it.
 

Steeplerot

Lifer
Mar 29, 2004
13,051
6
81
6-8$ a gallon of gas sounds good to me for non-business purposes.

Get you suburbanites off your lazy asses.
 

K1052

Elite Member
Aug 21, 2003
46,021
32,990
136
Originally posted by: ayabe
Originally posted by: K1052
"Democrats intend to achieve energy independence within 10 years"

I intend to have a billion dollars in my bank account and sleep with different smoking hot 20somthings every night.

*wakes up*

Anything is possible, you just have to 'believe' :p

There is an easy way to power our future, we just need to invent a way to generate electricity using high minded rhetoric.

Being an FL resident I do have some stake in this but I see no other alternative at this point, drilling offshore is inevitable, the best we can hope for is that all due diligence is being done to safeguard against disasters. Failing to secure energy resources for the future would basically signal the death knell for modern society.

P&N alone could power the eastern seaboard.

 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,095
513
126
Originally posted by: Steeplerot
Originally posted by: Genx87
Originally posted by: Steeplerot
Originally posted by: Genx87
Achieve energy indepdendence by closing off our natural resources? This is the line of thinking for the past 30 years that has increased our foreign imports of oil from ~30% to over 60%.

People like you lap it up and ask for more.

Please explain to us how to achieve energy independence in a realistic way while not tapping internal resources?

First step is to cut the greedmongers off from the black heroin.

Oh and please tell us oh wise one how you do that.

Just have to wait for energy bill huh? They are not even in power yet.

Hopefully you have lots of oil stock, looking forward to your whining :laugh:

I will take that lack of an answer as you were blowing hot air in your previous posts.
Considering the apparent plan of the democrats is to keep doing what we have for the past 30+ years since the last energy crisis. And over that time we have seen our foreign imports rise and oil companies growth explode. Maybe I should get on the bandwagon and buy some oil stock.

You guys think Bush is the oil companies best friend. When we move to 80% imports just wait, you havent seen anything yet.
 

GoPackGo

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 2003
6,414
468
126
The first thing we would have to do is quit importing and exporting.

Lots of fuel is wasted in the act of broad commerce.

Second. We go back to living near where we work.

Realize that tourism is dead and quit worrying about it.

Eliminate the monetary system and go back to bartering.

Eliminate allowing those to live in a climate that requires heating in the winter.

This is a good start.
 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,095
513
126
Originally posted by: Steeplerot
Originally posted by: Genx87

You guys think Bush is the oil companies best friend.


You are not very bright are you? But we know this.

I am Bright enough to provide thought out responses instead of insults with nothing to back my argument. If I can do that, where does it put you on the intelligence scale?

/shrug
 

Steeplerot

Lifer
Mar 29, 2004
13,051
6
81
Originally posted by: Genx87
Originally posted by: Steeplerot
Originally posted by: Genx87

You guys think Bush is the oil companies best friend.


You are not very bright are you? But we know this.

I am Bright enough to provide thought out responses instead of insults with nothing to back my argument. If I can do that, where does it put you on the intelligence scale?

/shrug



Saying some ignorant stuff like "You guys think Bush is the oil companies best friend." is about the stupidest thing I have heard on here since you all finally had to quit the "Vacation in lovely peaceful Iraq!" rose-colored glasses threads.
 

CPA

Elite Member
Nov 19, 2001
30,322
4
0
Originally posted by: Steeplerot
6-8$ a gallon of gas sounds good to me for non-business purposes.

Get you suburbanites off your lazy asses.

The SUV - The downfall of mankind :roll:
 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,095
513
126
Originally posted by: Steeplerot
Originally posted by: Genx87
Originally posted by: Steeplerot
Originally posted by: Genx87

You guys think Bush is the oil companies best friend.


You are not very bright are you? But we know this.

I am Bright enough to provide thought out responses instead of insults with nothing to back my argument. If I can do that, where does it put you on the intelligence scale?

/shrug



Saying some ignorant stuff like "You guys think Bush is the oil companies best friend." is about the stupidest thing I have heard on here since you all finally had to quit the "Vacation in lovely peaceful Iraq!" roes-colored glasses threads.

Uh it is called reading comprehension, something you probably didnt learn in your overfunded underperforming inner city public school.

The point I am makng is over the past 30 years with the status quo the democrats are going to use, the oil companies have grown a lot. And when we rely on more foreign oil than we do now due to democrats cutting off our domestic supply you can bet those oil companies will grow even more.

Is that too much for you to understand or should I type it slower for you?
 

CPA

Elite Member
Nov 19, 2001
30,322
4
0
What do we expect from a politician from a state that hasn't allowed any new oil & gas construction in the last 25 years.
 

Steeplerot

Lifer
Mar 29, 2004
13,051
6
81
Originally posted by: Genx87

The point I am makng is over the past 30 years with the status quo the democrats are going to use, the oil companies have grown a lot. And when we rely on more foreign oil than we do now due to democrats cutting off our domestic supply you can bet those oil companies will grow even more.

President Carter had a great plan 28 years ago before neocon twit reagan came in.

I assume they are going to work from there. (But who knows)

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/carter/filmmore/ps_energy.html

That is the concept of the energy policy we will present on Wednesday. Our national energy plan is based on ten fundamental principles.

The first principle is that we can have an effective and comprehensive energy policy only if the government takes responsibility for it and if the people understand the seriousness of the challenge and are willing to make sacrifices.

The second principle is that healthy economic growth must continue. Only by saving energy can we maintain our standard of living and keep our people at work. An effective conservation program will create hundreds of thousands of new jobs.

The third principle is that we must protect the environment. Our energy problems have the same cause as our environmental problems -- wasteful use of resources. Conservation helps us solve both at once.

The fourth principle is that we must reduce our vulnerability to potentially devastating embargoes. We can protect ourselves from uncertain supplies by reducing our demand for oil, making the most of our abundant resources such as coal, and developing a strategic petroleum reserve.

The fifth principle is that we must be fair. Our solutions must ask equal sacrifices from every region, every class of people, every interest group. Industry will have to do its part to conserve, just as the consumers will. The energy producers deserve fair treatment, but we will not let the oil companies profiteer.

The sixth principle, and the cornerstone of our policy, is to reduce the demand through conservation. Our emphasis on conservation is a clear difference between this plan and others which merely encouraged crash production efforts. Conservation is the quickest, cheapest, most practical source of energy. Conservation is the only way we can buy a barrel of oil for a few dollars. It costs about $13 to waste it.

The seventh principle is that prices should generally reflect the true replacement costs of energy. We are only cheating ourselves if we make energy artificially cheap and use more than we can really afford.

The eighth principle is that government policies must be predictable and certain. Both consumers and producers need policies they can count on so they can plan ahead. This is one reason I am working with the Congress to create a new Department of Energy, to replace more than 50 different agencies that now have some control over energy.

The ninth principle is that we must conserve the fuels that are scarcest and make the most of those that are more plentiful. We can't continue to use oil and gas for 75 percent of our consumption when they make up seven percent of our domestic reserves. We need to shift to plentiful coal while taking care to protect the environment, and to apply stricter safety standards to nuclear energy.

The tenth principle is that we must start now to develop the new, unconventional sources of energy we will rely on in the next century.

These ten principles have guided the development of the policy I would describe to you and the Congress on Wednesday.

Our energy plan will also include a number of specific goals, to measure our progress toward a stable energy system.

These are the goals we set for 1985:

--Reduce the annual growth rate in our energy demand to less than two percent.

--Reduce gasoline consumption by ten percent below its current level.

--Cut in half the portion of United States oil which is imported, from a potential level of 16 million barrels to six million barrels a day.

--Establish a strategic petroleum reserve of one billion barrels, more than six months' supply.

--Increase our coal production by about two thirds to more than 1 billion tons a year.

--Insulate 90 percent of American homes and all new buildings.

--Use solar energy in more than two and one-half million houses.

We will monitor our progress toward these goals year by year. Our plan will call for stricter conservation measures if we fall behind.

I cant tell you that these measures will be easy, nor will they be popular. But I think most of you realize that a policy which does not ask for changes or sacrifices would not be an effective policy.

This plan is essential to protect our jobs, our environment, our standard of living, and our future.

Whether this plan truly makes a difference will be decided not here in Washington, but in every town and every factory, in every home an don every highway and every farm.

I believe this can be a positive challenge. There is something especially American in the kinds of changes we have to make. We have been proud, through our history of being efficient people.

We have been proud of our leadership in the world. Now we have a chance again to give the world a positive example.

And we have been proud of our vision of the future. We have always wanted to give our children and grandchildren a world richer in possibilities than we've had. They are the ones we must provide for now. They are the ones who will suffer most if we don't act.

I've given you some of the principles of the plan.

I am sure each of you will find something you don't like about the specifics of our proposal. It will demand that we make sacrifices and changes in our lives. To some degree, the sacrifices will be painful -- but so is any meaningful sacrifice. It will lead to some higher costs, and to some greater inconveniences for everyone.

But the sacrifices will be gradual, realistic and necessary. Above all, they will be fair. No one will gain an unfair advantage through this plan. No one will be asked to bear an unfair burden. We will monitor the accuracy of data from the oil and natural gas companies, so that we will know their true production, supplies, reserves, and profits.

The citizens who insist on driving large, unnecessarily powerful cars must expect to pay more for that luxury.

We can be sure that all the special interest groups in the country will attack the part of this plan that affects them directly. They will say that sacrifice is fine, as long as other people do it, but that their sacrifice is unreasonable, or unfair, or harmful to the country. If they succeed, then the burden on the ordinary citizen, who is not organized into an interest group, would be crushing.

There should be only one test for this program: whether it will help our country.

Other generation of Americans have faced and mastered great challenges. I have faith that meeting this challenge will make our own lives even richer. If you will join me so that we can work together with patriotism and courage, we will again prove that our great nation can lead the world into an age of peace, independence and freedom.
 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,095
513
126
Wow I am speechless, using Carter as a framework for our energy policy.
What next, price controls?

btw who controlled the houses in 1977? How about in the 80s with Reagan as president?
 

Jaskalas

Lifer
Jun 23, 2004
33,425
7,485
136
Originally posted by: Steeplerot
Originally posted by: Genx87
Achieve energy indepdendence by closing off our natural resources? This is the line of thinking for the past 30 years that has increased our foreign imports of oil from ~30% to over 60%.

People like you lap it up and ask for more.

Please explain to us how to achieve energy independence in a realistic way while not tapping internal resources?

First step is to cut the greedmongers off from the black heroin.

Greedmongers, the people who drive to work everyday?
 

GoPackGo

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 2003
6,414
468
126
These are the goals we set for 1985:

--Reduce the annual growth rate in our energy demand to less than two percent.

--Reduce gasoline consumption by ten percent below its current level.

--Cut in half the portion of United States oil which is imported, from a potential level of 16 million barrels to six million barrels a day.

--Establish a strategic petroleum reserve of one billion barrels, more than six months' supply.

--Increase our coal production by about two thirds to more than 1 billion tons a year.

--Insulate 90 percent of American homes and all new buildings.

--Use solar energy in more than two and one-half million houses.

Solar is still expensive
Bush has mentioned more coal and gets railed.
We have had huge population increases
New home (in my area) have energy codes. Furnances are more efficient than ever.

Its the roadways.

Lets say I work in town A, where I make enough money to live in town B. The problem is town be 20 miles away. My only option is to drive to work. Town A is so expensive to live in or is not a good place to raise a family. Town B doesnt offer jobs that allow me to work in Town B and live in Town B.

I know people who drive 80 miles a day to work and 80 miles back because thatw where they can afford to live. Now compound similar situations for millions.
 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,095
513
126
Originally posted by: GoPackGo
These are the goals we set for 1985:

--Reduce the annual growth rate in our energy demand to less than two percent.

--Reduce gasoline consumption by ten percent below its current level.

--Cut in half the portion of United States oil which is imported, from a potential level of 16 million barrels to six million barrels a day.

--Establish a strategic petroleum reserve of one billion barrels, more than six months' supply.

--Increase our coal production by about two thirds to more than 1 billion tons a year.

--Insulate 90 percent of American homes and all new buildings.

--Use solar energy in more than two and one-half million houses.

Solar is still expensive
Bush has mentioned more coal and gets railed.
We have had huge population increases
New home (in my area) have energy codes. Furnances are more efficient than ever.

Its the roadways.

Lets say I work in town A, where I make enough money to live in town B. The problem is town be 20 miles away. My only option is to drive to work. Town A is so expensive to live in or is not a good place to raise a family. Town B doesnt offer jobs that allow me to work in Town B and live in Town B.

I know people who drive 80 miles a day to work and 80 miles back because thatw where they can afford to live. Now compound similar situations for millions.


Hey, that sounds like Dave.
btw I think this situation can be handled by telecommuting. There are lots of jobs that shouldnt require people being in a cubicle to perform.