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Jessica Lynch - should she be the 2nd woman to get the medal of honor?

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Mday

Lifer
Oct 14, 1999
18,646
1
76
i do not know all the facts, but what has been said of the incident does not qualify for the CMoH. However, it does qualify her to be considered for the CMoH. i would not be surprised if she got it. i would not be surprised if she does not.
 

gentobu

Golden Member
Jul 6, 2001
1,546
0
0
Originally posted by: KC5AV
Originally posted by: Zugzwang152
INOUYE, DANIEL K.




Second Lieutenant Daniel K. Inouye distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action on 21 April 1945, in the vicinity of San Terenzo, Italy. While attacking a defended ridge guarding an important road junction, Second Lieutenant Inouye skillfully directed his platoon through a hail of automatic weapon and small arms fire, in a swift enveloping movement that resulted in the capture of an artillery and mortar post and brought his men to within 40 yards of the hostile force. Emplaced in bunkers and rock formations, the enemy halted the advance with crossfire from three machine guns. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Second Lieutenant Inouye crawled up the treacherous slope to within five yards of the nearest machine gun and hurled two grenades, destroying the emplacement. Before the enemy could retaliate, he stood up and neutralized a second machine gun nest. Although wounded by a sniper?s bullet, he continued to engage other hostile positions at close range until an exploding grenade shattered his right arm. Despite the intense pain, he refused evacuation and continued to direct his platoon until enemy resistance was broken and his men were again deployed in defensive positions. In the attack, 25 enemy soldiers were killed and eight others captured. By his gallant, aggressive tactics and by his indomitable leadership, Second Lieutenant Inouye enabled his platoon to advance through formidable resistance, and was instrumental in the capture of the ridge. Second Lieutenant Inouye?s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.
one of the US Senators from my state (Hawaii) :)
Didn't he lose his arm as a result of that??
yup.

 

GoingUp

Lifer
Jul 31, 2002
16,721
0
71
Originally posted by: Skoorb
I don't know - I'm sure there are people who have done more than her in this; the difference is she got caught and gained the news. Should that really mean she should get a medal of honor? And I'm not trying to be antagonistic but the only difference between her and probably quite a few other people who have fought with all their heart over there is that she got caught (not that I'm slighting her for that).
I would have to agree with skoorbie.... she got captured after fighting bravely... not something that I think is Medal of Honor worthy... could be worth some other medals though.
 

Chaotic42

Lifer
Jun 15, 2001
33,854
957
126
No.

The Medal of Honor is for the most extreme cases possible of heroics. Like rescuing 20 guys out of a prison camp and taking out a few tanks along the way while taking fire.

It's lame, but have you ever seen Forrest Gump? That gets you a Medal of Honor.
 

Emos

Golden Member
Oct 27, 2000
1,989
0
0
Not quite MoH material. Bronze Star (maybe Silver) along with the Purple Heart and POW ribbon.
 

Spoooon

Lifer
Mar 3, 2000
11,561
201
106
I agree with the guys saying that no, she does not deserve the CMOH. However, that is not to say that she is not a good soldier, etc. I think that you have to compare her deeds with those of overs that have been awarded the medal in the past. Looked at in that light, there is no way.
 

Judgement

Diamond Member
Feb 8, 2001
3,816
0
0
Originally posted by: iamwiz82
Originally posted by: oldsmoboat
Originally posted by: iamwiz82
she was shot and stabbed, but kept on fighting though. Would you?
Would I, what?
keep fighting rather than playing dead or surrendering?
Who wouldn't... you were trained to fight and being a POW in a ME country could easily be worse then death itself... she is lucky to be alive.

Although I don't know enough information to give a real opinion about whether she should receive the medal of honor or not, I don't believe she should receive it simply because she was caught by the Iraqis. What about the other POW who were caught and were executed? What did she do to deserve the medal of honor that they didn't?
 

waggy

No Lifer
Dec 14, 2000
68,155
9
81
OH HELL NO SHE DOES NOT!

thousands of other soldiers are doing more every day then she did.
The people that have EARNED the MOH did something that not many poeple have done in the short time we have had an Army.

If you knew what people have done that have recived the medal and compared it to what she did then you would understand. If she gets it then it would tarnish the true Honor of haveing one.
 

LunarRay

Diamond Member
Mar 2, 2003
9,993
1
76
Not no but, hell no. What act above and beyond has she performed?

I've not yet heard of an act that should be honored with a silver star. A few bonze stars though.
 

dleiss

Member
Apr 5, 2002
151
0
0
ergeorge,

So you are/were a rat!! I was a Highty Tighty (Regimental Band) in 1966, class of 1970. Including the band and jocks, there were 18 companies of cadets, living in most of the upper quad. I was in the last freshman class housed in Lane Hall. Back then the girls at Radford loved the uniforms. I remember the construction of expanding Burroughs(sp) Hall in order to contain something called a mainframe computer. It was supposed to do automate my slide rule.
 
Oct 19, 2000
17,862
3
81
Originally posted by: DaveSohmer
The deed performed must have been one of personal bravery or self-sacrifice so conspicuous as to clearly distinguish the individual above his comrades and must have involved risk of life. Incontestable proof of the performance of the service will be exacted and each recommendation for the award of this decoration will be considered on the standard of extraordinary merit.
[/quote]
It so clearly states 'his'. Her being a woman denies her the ability to receive the honor. :p

And, yes, they should give her a Medal of Honor. It's a great game, and we should throw in the Spearhead expansion as well to say sorry about her luck. :p

But seriously, if everything is true and not just propaganda, then she well deserves some kind of honor, but not the Medal of Honor. There are many good points in this thread about why she should not receive it. I have the upmost respect for her and her fallen comrades.
 

LeeTJ

Diamond Member
Jan 21, 2003
4,899
0
0
Originally posted by: SociallyChallenged
I think she should be given it. She was fighting, and was shot. For me, that's enough, because I know if I was in that situation and I got shot, I'd be like "OH SNAP!" and panic. She had courage, and I think she deserves it.
isn't there an award for that?? i'm certain she will receive the purple heart.

if you read stories of some of the MOH winners tho i'm not sure that she is there.
 

StormRider

Diamond Member
Mar 12, 2000
8,325
2
0
Hmmm, according to foxnews, it said that she did not have any gunshot or stabbing wounds. Now I'm confused. She just had an operation on her back.

Foxnews
 

ROTC1983

Diamond Member
Oct 2, 2002
6,130
0
71
Originally posted by: Zugzwang152
INOUYE, DANIEL K.




Second Lieutenant Daniel K. Inouye distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action on 21 April 1945, in the vicinity of San Terenzo, Italy. While attacking a defended ridge guarding an important road junction, Second Lieutenant Inouye skillfully directed his platoon through a hail of automatic weapon and small arms fire, in a swift enveloping movement that resulted in the capture of an artillery and mortar post and brought his men to within 40 yards of the hostile force. Emplaced in bunkers and rock formations, the enemy halted the advance with crossfire from three machine guns. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Second Lieutenant Inouye crawled up the treacherous slope to within five yards of the nearest machine gun and hurled two grenades, destroying the emplacement. Before the enemy could retaliate, he stood up and neutralized a second machine gun nest. Although wounded by a sniper?s bullet, he continued to engage other hostile positions at close range until an exploding grenade shattered his right arm. Despite the intense pain, he refused evacuation and continued to direct his platoon until enemy resistance was broken and his men were again deployed in defensive positions. In the attack, 25 enemy soldiers were killed and eight others captured. By his gallant, aggressive tactics and by his indomitable leadership, Second Lieutenant Inouye enabled his platoon to advance through formidable resistance, and was instrumental in the capture of the ridge. Second Lieutenant Inouye?s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.
one of the US Senators from my state (Hawaii) :)
:)
 

Armitage

Banned
Feb 23, 2001
8,086
0
0
Originally posted by: dleiss
ergeorge,

So you are/were a rat!! I was a Highty Tighty (Regimental Band) in 1966, class of 1970. Including the band and jocks, there were 18 companies of cadets, living in most of the upper quad. I was in the last freshman class housed in Lane Hall. Back then the girls at Radford loved the uniforms. I remember the construction of expanding Burroughs(sp) Hall in order to contain something called a mainframe computer. It was supposed to do automate my slide rule.
Yep, F-91!
We started with 10 companies & HT, but dropped 2 my junior year. Spent my days in Rasche. One of my roomates married a Radford girl. I had an account on a mainframe in Burroughs my freshman year ... remember picking up jobs. But nobody I know used it after that.

When I was there they were talking about closing all the residence halls on upper quad, and making them into offices, but I don't know if it happened. You didn't have PCs in your rooms obviously, but they were still using that coal-burning power plant on campus. Between that & the turn-of-the (last) century wiring in those dorms, they were constantly having brown/black outs. Nobody had UPS in those days, and you could here screams up & down the halls when it happened!
 

Zugzwang152

Lifer
Oct 30, 2001
12,134
1
0
Originally posted by: Mday
i do not know all the facts, but what has been said of the incident does not qualify for the CMoH. However, it does qualify her to be considered for the CMoH. i would not be surprised if she got it. i would not be surprised if she does not.
so basically you don't care? ;)
 

waggy

No Lifer
Dec 14, 2000
68,155
9
81
Originally posted by: Tates
Hmmm, according to foxnews, it said that she did not have any gunshot or sta*bing wounds. Now I'm confused. She just had an operation on her back.
I watched her parents giving a press conference earlier this morning, and they said the doctors didn't find any bullet or knife wounds.
yeap i seen that also. but 2 broken legs and a broken arm is bad enough.

that is a brave girl. teh US Army is lucky to have some like that.
 

Analog

Lifer
Jan 7, 2002
12,755
1
0
Originally posted by: StormRider
Hmmm, according to foxnews, it said that she did not have any gunshot or stabbing wounds. Now I'm confused. She just had an operation on her back.

Foxnews

i guess the story is still developing.
 

Pastfinder

Platinum Member
Jul 2, 2000
2,352
0
0
It seems that many of you people have no fvcking idea how significant the Congressional Medal of Honor is. The medal is not awarded for doing your duty, but going "above and beyond the call of duty."
Maybe this will enlighten some of you: http://www.cmohs.com
 

Moemar

Member
Aug 19, 2001
177
0
0
Originally posted by: RgrPark
No way she should get it. If it was a special ops operator who got ambushed and got captured, no one would even think about giving him a MOH...the only reason some of you think she deserves it is because she's a young female supply clerk. Let's view the standards objectively...<STRONG>everything she did (fighting until she ran out of rounds) is what a soldier is SUPPOSED to do</STRONG>. I give her props for doing what a well trained soldier is supposed to do but that in no way deserves a MOH. <STRONG>She will get a POW medal, a purple heart and "maybe" something like a bronze star but i think that's even too much.
</STRONG>
Bottom line, she performed her duties as expected of a well trained soldier. <STRONG>She did not go "above and beyond the call of duty".</STRONG> Do you think she would volunteer to do something like Shugart and Gordon (they volunteered to give their lives to attempt to protect the downed pilot in Somalia and paid the ultimate price), i think not. MOH is the HIGHEST award given and should not be given out lightly. I am in no way putting down the Pfc. <STRONG>She performed exactly the way a soldier should have performed and i respect her for it, but we're talking about the MOH here.</STRONG>
 

Rudee

Lifer
Apr 23, 2000
11,218
2
76
Originally posted by: Brutuskend
Maybe not, but what WAS her duty?
She was a supply clerk.

One of the first MOH presented in WWII was to a cook who manned a AA gun at Pearl.
She was a soldier first, a supply clerk second.

 

Pastfinder

Platinum Member
Jul 2, 2000
2,352
0
0
Here is the ultimate American fighting machine:

MURPHY, AUDIE L.

Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, Company B 1 5th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Holtzwihr France, 26 January 1945. Entered service at: Dallas, Tex. Birth: Hunt County, near Kingston, Tex. G.O. No.. 65, 9 August 1945. Citation 2d Lt. Murphy commanded Company B, which was attacked by 6 tanks and waves of infantry. 2d Lt. Murphy ordered his men to withdraw to prepared positions in a woods, while he remained forward at his command post and continued to give fire directions to the artillery by telephone. Behind him, to his right, 1 of our tank destroyers received a direct hit
and began to burn. Its crew withdrew to the woods. 2d Lt. Murphy continued to direct artillery fire which killed large numbers of the advancing enemy infantry. With the enemy tanks abreast of his position, 2d Lt. Murphy climbed on the burning tank destroyer, which was in danger of blowing up at any moment, and employed its .50 caliber machinegun against the enemy. He was alone and exposed to German fire from 3 sides, but his deadly fire killed dozens of Germans and caused their infantry attack to waver. The
enemy tanks, losing infantry support, began to fall back. For an hour the Germans tried every available weapon to eliminate 2d Lt. Murphy, but he continued to hold his position and wiped out a squad which was trying to creep up unnoticed on his right flank. Germans reached as close as 10 yards, only to be mowed down by his fire. He received a leg wound, but ignored it and continued the single-handed fight until his ammunition was exhausted. He then made his way to his company, refused medical attention, and
organized the company in a counterattack which forced the Germans to withdraw. His directing of artillery fire wiped out many of the enemy; he killed or wounded about 50. 2d Lt. Murphy's indomitable courage and his refusal to give an inch of ground saved his company from possible encirclement and destruction, and enabled it to hold the woods which had been the enemy's objective.



 

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