Is Win 7 more privacy-friendly than win 10?

iElite

Junior Member
Apr 20, 2018
10
0
11
#1
Hello, I don't just rely on windows defender so I have Bit Defender 2019 premium + Malware bytes paid version. And I don't open shady sites, no porn sites and nothing.

My work is youtube + making sites + heavy browsing (related to work) + editing only.

I know win 7 is old but I still see many people and company rocking Win XP and Win 7 with latest service packs and with strong antivirus and anti-malware software and don't open any "entertainment sites". Only strict work purpose.

Also, the current windows 10 update made my system slow. Many users are complaining.

So, I wanted to know that is Win 7 more privacy-friendly than Win 10 and what problems can I face on Win 7 if I'm careful with browsing and such like I said above?

Looking for opinions and what windows are you using for your work nowadays?

PS: I DON'T like windows updates. How can my pc get affected with malwares if I don't open any shady sites and dont click on random links? I dont do anything else other than youtube + making sites + heavy browsing (related to work) + editing.
 
Feb 20, 2011
33
2
66
#2
I'm using Win7 Home Premium x64 SP1 without any updates and without any anti-whatever stuff, for years. And I never had troubles (and yes, I do visit "risky" download sites).
What I think it's important for security is:
1. Firewall with income+outcome control!
-every installed "strange" (virus, malware, whatever) software will try to reach it's "home" over the internet (that's it's main purpose). Not only firewall control prevents that, it also shows who's trying to connect to outside world (internet).
2. Up to date browser without any plugins and addons!
-everything needed for "normal" browsing (and more), is already built into browser. Various addons will only confuse you in case something doesn't work as expected. Example: at some point (while browsing) you get message "your Adobe Flash is outdated -update?" and of course, you say yes. Now, how do you know you're actually updating Flash?
3. Think twice before you click "confirm".
-lately I get the impression, official web sites are worse (more risky) than many "not so legal" sites. In case of downloading something, there's a big chance you'll click wrong download button and ended by installing some browser search addon. Worse: many official shareware products already contain various "addons" inside installer.

Finally, my personal opinion about security: no matter if it's Win7 or Win10.. in 99% it's user's fault.
 

iElite

Junior Member
Apr 20, 2018
10
0
11
#3
I'm using Win7 Home Premium x64 SP1 without any updates and without any anti-whatever stuff, for years. And I never had troubles (and yes, I do visit "risky" download sites).
What I think it's important for security is:
1. Firewall with income+outcome control!
-every installed "strange" (virus, malware, whatever) software will try to reach it's "home" over the internet (that's it's main purpose). Not only firewall control prevents that, it also shows who's trying to connect to outside world (internet).
2. Up to date browser without any plugins and addons!
-everything needed for "normal" browsing (and more), is already built into browser. Various addons will only confuse you in case something doesn't work as expected. Example: at some point (while browsing) you get message "your Adobe Flash is outdated -update?" and of course, you say yes. Now, how do you know you're actually updating Flash?
3. Think twice before you click "confirm".
-lately I get the impression, official web sites are worse (more risky) than many "not so legal" sites. In case of downloading something, there's a big chance you'll click wrong download button and ended by installing some browser search addon. Worse: many official shareware products already contain various "addons" inside installer.

Finally, my personal opinion about security: no matter if it's Win7 or Win10.. in 99% it's user's fault.
True.
 

BSim500

Golden Member
Jun 5, 2013
1,443
198
106
#5
So, I wanted to know that is Win 7 more privacy-friendly than Win 10 and what problems can I face on Win 7 if I'm careful with browsing and such like I said above?
Yes, significantly more so. There were a couple of later updates that added some telemetry but everyone who tries to hold that up as "the same as W10" forgets that 1. They're nowhere near as invasive, and 2. They can be permanently blocked / prevented from installing in the first place (or removed if they've already been installed).

The main things you can do that make far more of a difference to real-world security are:-

1. Change the default password your router and / or disable remote (WAN side) admin of your router. This protects against spoof DNS attacks (where someone could potentially change the DNS server address on your router (that your router then gives to all devices on the network via DCHP) to a malware one that redirects, eg, web addresses for bank / Paypal, etc, websites to fake ones that harvest all your login data.

2. Install uBlock Origin (blocks most malvertising). This also speeds up browsing up to 5x by removing all the web-site level telemetry / social media tracking garbage. And if you insist on visiting iffy sites, then use Noscript as the "nuclear" option to block everything, then just whitelist sites as needed.

3. Don't download software you're unsure about (including installer "stubs"). Don't open any .exe's in e-mails. Don't click on links in financial e-mails. Eg, for banks, manually type the real web address, then bookmark it and use that as a "safe" bookmark rather than potentially click on plausibly real looking spoof e-mails that will take you almost correct sites that are one letter out.

4. If you share a house / flat with someone of questionable character (eg, college house-mates), password protect your PC, encrypt your personal data (inc backups), and get into the habit of locking it (Windows Key + L) when away from keyboard or resuming from suspend.

5. Set your firewall to Whitelist (block all by default, allow by exception) rather than default Blacklist (allow all by default, block by exception). Obviously add web browser, e-mail, Anti-Malware, etc). After that it takes only 1-2 seconds to click "Allow" to a piece of software that asks to connect (eg, a multi-player game), but will block anything that asks to connect when it shouldn't.

^ This stuff makes way more of a difference to real life security than Windows spyware ever will, and I openly laugh at anyone who "upgrades" to W10 for "better security" yet still continues to run a default BlackList based Firewall that waves the newest keylogger's uploads straight on through and whose Router's login is still the default Username : "admin" / Password : "password"...
 
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