I want to mess around with Linux again, recommendations for a noob?

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Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
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Despite my earlier comments about Debian and usability, after Ajay casually mentioned switching to Debian I thought I'd give it another try.

One significant reason IMO not to go for Ubuntu derivatives this days is the snap packaging for apps. I simply cannot believe that Chromium when run natively on my PC off an SSD is slower to start than Chromium installed in a Debian VM on my machine when the VM is being hosted on a 5400RPM hard drive. The mind freaking boggles. And no, it has nothing to do with my Chromium setup, it's always been this slow.

Another reason why I'm thinking of switching to Debian is because MTP has suddenly stopped working on my Kubuntu install.
Went over to Kubuntu 20.04 LTS. These cutting edge rolling releases seem too buggy, at least for me. Not running on hardware right now - I may go back later - but dual booting is a PITA.
 

Triloby

Senior member
Mar 18, 2016
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271
136
Well, both Ubuntu and their derivatives are all on 22.04 LTS now.

Apparently, it's "supposed" to be a better release compared to 20.04, but people are still making tons of (reasonable) complaints on them. NVIDIA defaulting to X.org instead of Wayland on their proprietary drivers (which they had to break that promise), snaps still being the default (especially Firefox), etc. etc.

I guess GNOME 42 and the refreshed Yaru theme are kinda nice and the new kernel has NTFS support, but it looks like I'll just wait before Canonical manages to iron out these issues (if they can).

Based on what I'm hearing about the new Kubuntu 22.04 LTS, it doesn't seem like people are happy about it.
 

Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
15,332
7,787
136
Well, both Ubuntu and their derivatives are all on 22.04 LTS now.

Apparently, it's "supposed" to be a better release compared to 20.04, but people are still making tons of (reasonable) complaints on them. NVIDIA defaulting to X.org instead of Wayland on their proprietary drivers (which they had to break that promise), snaps still being the default (especially Firefox), etc. etc.

I guess GNOME 42 and the refreshed Yaru theme are kinda nice and the new kernel has NTFS support, but it looks like I'll just wait before Canonical manages to iron out these issues (if they can).

Based on what I'm hearing about the new Kubuntu 22.04 LTS, it doesn't seem like people are happy about it.
Well, upgrades aren’t available till ~ August (upgrade still in testing). Fresh installs are good to go. I made a back up and forced the upgrade. SNAP sucks, IMHO and the Kubuntu team screwed with stuff that was working fine and made somethings more complicated (extra pointless clicks). I reverted - will check to see if there are improvements when 22.04 is offered via Discover system updates.
 

Shamrock

Golden Member
Oct 11, 1999
1,438
558
136
If you are on KDE, why not bypass Kubuntu, and go to the source. KDENeon is KDE's distro (but its not a distro!). It is Ubuntu based, but without Snaps. It is really snappy.

 

Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
15,332
7,787
136
If you are on KDE, why not bypass Kubuntu, and go to the source. KDENeon is KDE's distro (but its not a distro!). It is Ubuntu based, but without Snaps. It is really snappy.

Hmm, since I have VMware Workstations, that would be easy to try out. Is it a stable version or rolling release?
 

Triloby

Senior member
Mar 18, 2016
584
271
136
Hmm, since I have VMware Workstations, that would be easy to try out. Is it a stable version or rolling release?

It's a stable release, but you still have to remove the snap backend in Discover which is still there by default. Also, I don't think that KDE neon's base hasn't been updated to the new 22.04 LTS release yet.
 

mikeymikec

Lifer
May 19, 2011
17,393
8,828
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I'm having a play around with Neon because with Debian I'm not overly keen that the Epson inkjet driver won't install (no lsb in debian), which leaves just the standard escpr driver, which is kind of like that scene out of Hot Fuzz where the barman is asked what wines he has and he responds, "we got red or uh... white". Literally four configurable options in that driver!

Admittedly I wonder if those four are what I need the vast majority of the time, but it doesn't seem like a good start to say, "well I can always rely on a VM if I need x".
 

mikeymikec

Lifer
May 19, 2011
17,393
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Btw, about KDE Neon and snap - it seems to me that it still uses snap because chromium is listed as a snap package. I found some reddit comments on the topic of removing snap but it seems to me that it'll just remove snap support from the Discover app, which still leaves a pretty good chance that I'd end up with snap stuff on my system when I don't want it. Does anyone know how to do a more thorough job, and in doing so will that leave me with very little to choose from when installing packages from Ubuntu repositories?

- edit -

I found this guide:

and I've tried it out on my neon VM. No snap packages installed by default, and removing snapd seemed to work. The chromium snap package is still listed in Muon though, which I guess means that whenever I go to install a package I'll need to check whether the version supplied in the default repository is a snap?
 
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Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
15,332
7,787
136
Btw, about KDE Neon and snap - it seems to me that it still uses snap because chromium is listed as a snap package. I found some reddit comments on the topic of removing snap but it seems to me that it'll just remove snap support from the Discover app, which still leaves a pretty good chance that I'd end up with snap stuff on my system when I don't want it. Does anyone know how to do a more thorough job, and in doing so will that leave me with very little to choose from when installing packages from Ubuntu repositories?

- edit -

I found this guide:

and I've tried it out on my neon VM. No snap packages installed by default, and removing snapd seemed to work. The chromium snap package is still listed in Muon though, which I guess means that whenever I go to install a package I'll need to check whether the version supplied in the default repository is a snap?
Yeah, I removed snap form discover, uninstalled Firefox and then removed all vestiges of the system snap libraries and the daemon. It an okay distr,o it’s just very lean, so one has to install whatever non KDE apps one wants. It’s snappier than Kubuntu. It’s a stable release, except that it periodically updates to the latest Plasma release.
 

Shamrock

Golden Member
Oct 11, 1999
1,438
558
136
I just looked on my newly installed KDENeon (2022414-9460), went to Konsole, and typed in snap list

Snaps are not installed on this system. But here is a video to uninstall snaps.

 
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Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
15,332
7,787
136
I just looked on my newly installed KDENeon (2022414-9460), went to Konsole, and typed in snap list

Snaps are not installed on this system. But here is a video to uninstall snaps.

Sorry for the confusion, I as referring to the most recent release of Kubuntu 22.04. I still have that and Neon running in VMs. I’m a long way off from running Linux as my daily driver. Even then I’ll keep Win10/11 for certain use cases, especially gaming.
 
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mxnerd

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2007
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My experience with KDE Neon is that it costantly freezes for no reason.
 

Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
15,332
7,787
136
My experience with KDE Neon is that it costantly freezes for no reason.
On a VM I mainly get library conflicts, or so it seems. Thankfully, a quick snapshot restore, that I keep on a separate disk, fixes those. Then the disk with the snap shots, and a bunch of other stuff, goes to the NAS every week.

Aren't computers so fun :p