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How about Windows 10 Workstation for a gaming rig?

Micrornd

Golden Member
Mar 2, 2013
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I game (some, a little) on my workstation and it's running Windows 10 Pro for Workstations, if that helps you any?
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
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Mau be this will Help.



:cool:
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
52,231
7,049
126
How many GPUs does Windows 10 support? Because one of my boxes with Intel iGPU + 5x GTX 1660ti cards, started showing only four of the GTX 1660ti cards. I mean, I probably have a hardware problem (card or riser), but just wanted to double-check if MS limited Windows 10 (Pro, I believe) to only 4x or 5x GPUs.
 

mxnerd

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2007
6,192
900
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How many GPUs does Windows 10 support? Because one of my boxes with Intel iGPU + 5x GTX 1660ti cards, started showing only four of the GTX 1660ti cards. I mean, I probably have a hardware problem (card or riser), but just wanted to double-check if MS limited Windows 10 (Pro, I believe) to only 4x or 5x GPUs.
Someone said 21 (12 AMD + 9 NVIDIA), but he is running a couple of machines that has 13 GPUs.

Your system (CPU/motherboard) probably probably does not enough PCIE lanes.

===

ASUS has a B250 mining motherboard that support 18x1 and 1x16 graphics card.

 
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VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
52,231
7,049
126
It WAS working a-OK, so etiher:
1) recent windows update limits GPUs to four in one rig (possibly in an attempt to "squeeze" mining-rig operators into have to buy a special / higher version of Windows for GPU mining from this point on), kinda conspiratorial, but seeing how Asus and the rest of the AIB GPU gang have raised their MSRPs and are now in full profiteering mode, I suppose anything is possible, OR,
2) I've had a GPU or riser / power-adapter go bad.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
52,231
7,049
126
Didn't you try to swap those risers?
I got some more, I just haven't gone into diagnosing and fixing the whole rig. I was wondering if it was worth the time doing that, if it was just caused by a Windows Update instead, if anyone knew of that.
 

Shmee

Memory and Storage, Graphics Cards
Super Moderator
Sep 13, 2008
5,409
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This is an interesting topic/question. I wonder if the workstation edition gives you a lot more control over services and updates, where Pro would not? I ask because I know a lot of people that are tired of having Windows 10 restart for updates after a while.
 

Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,887
635
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I very vaguely recall that its major features were technical in nature, i.e. higher accessible memory limits for workstations (6TB vs 2TB on regular Pro), and an improved scheduler for dealing with CPU thread counts exceeding 64 threads (so as to avoid having to divide the cores/threads into processor groups like regular Pro does which results in a performance hit). I think it also allows twice as many physical processor sockets as regular Pro as well (4 vs regular Pro's 2).

I've got a key laying around for it somewhere, and played with it for a while after it was announced. However, all the regular limits related to services and Windows update seem to still apply.

In short, if you've got a Threadripper 3990X or something like an ultra high core/thread count Xeon (maybe a Phi?) in a workstation, you most definitely want it. Otherwise, it is a waste of money.

I doubt it has anything that would be of any help with gaming at all.
 
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Micrornd

Golden Member
Mar 2, 2013
1,187
140
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I very vaguely recall that its major features were technical in nature, i.e. higher accessible memory limits for workstations (6TB vs 2TB on regular Pro), and an improved scheduler for dealing with CPU thread counts exceeding 64 threads (so as to avoid having to divide the cores/threads into processor groups like regular Pro does which results in a performance hit). I think it also allows twice as many physical processor sockets as regular Pro as well (4 vs regular Pro's 2).
Just for future reference for those accessing this thread -
Windows 10 Home allows 1 sockets and up to 64 cores, Pro (and Education Versions) allows 2 sockets and/or up to 128 cores, and Pro for Workstations (and Enterprise Versions) allows 4 sockets and/or up to 256 cores.
(Core count is physical cores)
As core count rises in processors, "Processor Groups" are actually of more concern for best performance.
 
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