Help me pick a martial art.

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Babbles

Diamond Member
Jan 4, 2001
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Originally posted by: Booster
Learn 'face beating when drunk in a crowded bar' martial art - the most difficult of all. No matter what you can do, kung fu etc, it won't work in such a situation when you're close to some suckers and they're all after you.

 

kenshorin

Golden Member
Apr 14, 2001
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Originally posted by: Booster
Learn 'face beating when drunk in a crowded bar' martial art - the most difficult of all. No matter what you can do, kung fu etc, it won't work in such a situation when you're close to some suckers and they're all after you.
let me guess... you took kuhrotty for about 5 months back when you were twelve and got pissed because you didn't learn how to go super saiyan... so rather than it being you, its the martial art that sucks.

Or, you were doing Tie Kwan Dough, and your shidoshi taught you a Hurricane Kick (tm), and you tried to impress your friends with it, and got tossed on your ass. (this is actually the more serious of the two, nothing gets to me more than bad MA instructors who teach cheesy moves because its what the public "thinks" martial arts are supposed to be.)
 

RGN

Diamond Member
Feb 24, 2000
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Originally posted by: polm
I am 24 years old and I have been doing HIIT (High Intensity / MAX-OT) Weight Training and Cardio for about 6 months.

I would like to start taking a martial art that will mesh with my current exercise routine.

What martial arts lend themselves to helping me gain Strength and Flexibility without having a serious negative impact on my weight training ? I like to do short cardio workouts that don't dip into my muscle reserves.

I am really looking for a martial art that is fun and interesting, increases flexibilty, involves a semi-spiritual approach (meditation, etc) .

Something that I can practice on my own would be nice too.

How about you go to the phone book and find the dojo's in you area that you would be willing to travel to, and make a poll of the 3. :D
 
Dec 28, 2001
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Originally posted by: polm
I am 24 years old and I have been doing HIIT (High Intensity / MAX-OT) Weight Training and Cardio for about 6 months.

I would like to start taking a martial art that will mesh with my current exercise routine.

What martial arts lend themselves to helping me gain Strength and Flexibility without having a serious negative impact on my weight training ? I like to do short cardio workouts that don't dip into my muscle reserves.

I am really looking for a martial art that is fun and interesting, increases flexibilty, involves a semi-spiritual approach (meditation, etc) .

Something that I can practice on my own would be nice too.
I"m getting the impression that you're not too interested in the self-dfense aspect of martial arts: unfortunately, this is where a lot of the spiritual side comes in -

The three styles I'd advise you to look for are Wushu, Capoeria, and Aikido: the first two are acrobatically beautiful, and Aikido has a beauty all its own, plus it's very spiritual . . ..
 

Titan

Golden Member
Oct 15, 1999
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Originally posted by: amcdonald
Any martial art that you can practice on your own is going to be ineffective against other people or in a fight.
I'd say keep your workout the way it is, and take some different styles until you find a TEACHER you are impressed by.
Don't do 30-person karate classes, and don't take lessons that are expensive. Find someone who is teaching for the love of their art.
I'd recommend looking into grappling and stand-up fighting styles.

amcdonald is right on this one, find a teacher that impresses you. I was very fortunate to find a Tae Kwon Do school I began training with when I was 13 where the instructors were actual martial artists, they embodied love for their art and strong spirit. They were very knowledgeable and adept at conveying the knowledge and wisdom of the art to their students, including me. The more I traveled to competitions and demonstrations, the more I saw that Martial Arts is just a bussiness to most "black belts" and they don't care about their students, just the money they bring in. Don't judge an instructor by number of years spent training and teaching. My instructor was in many ways a better teacher than his teacher, despite being young. Don't pre-judge on race either, particlarly in TKD, which is like football in korea and is more of an art in the US than it is in korea. TKD is good for flexibility and leg strength in general, but there is not much philosophy/spiritual stuff that goes with it. But, as a TKD practicioner, the only "spiritual" aspect I need is a room full of guys and gals sweating it up, throwing kicks and yelling with fierce determination. If you want to get more spiritual, i'd reccomend Tai Chi, it takes great patience and concetration, and breathing is a major part of it's study. Once you pick an art you are interested in, shop around for a school. Watch a class. Look for a teacher who engages his students, and will take a moment out of class to critique individuals, maybe even give speeches to explain important concepts. Pay attention to how his students look, even the kids. If the high ranks look just as sloppy as the low ranks, he is not a good teacher. Look for someone with brains who takes good care of his students, then you will find an art you enjoy.
 

Kelemvor

Lifer
May 23, 2002
16,930
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I'd to with Tae Kwon Do. Very much in flexibility and spirit and such. I had a loto f fun when I did it. You can put as much or as little as you want into it as far as class time. Can also compete in tournaments if you desire, etc.

Many places will give you a free session if you ask. Try out a couple or go to watch some classes and see what you think.
 

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